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Discussion Starter #1
I realize that's a strong title, and may get my post deleted, and may even get me blocked from this site. But after what I've gone through trying to do a simple mechanical job that I've done on many of the cars I've owned in the past, the title and the attitude are justified.

Ready...

I tried to change the front wheel bearings on a 2004 2WD Kia Sorento.
On many other cars, it's fairly basic procedure any adequate shade tree mechanic can do in their driveway with a relatively standard set of hand tools. But on this car the hub/bearing design is so poor that you have to replace the entire hub assembly! What are the problems you might ask if you're still reading this?

1 - Sealed bearings so you can't re-pack them as part of regular brake maintenance. Granted I'm just on the other side of 50 and my 1st car was a '64 Oldsmobile that you could replace EVERYTHING on, but come on, some of us keep our cars longer than the extended warranty and like to maintain them ourselves. (As demonstrated by the existence of this very forum)

2 - OK, so I don't have to bother with re-packing the bearings at every brake job, that's great. But then make the hub so thet the bearings can be replaced when they wear out, or every 50-75k miles just to be safe. But no, you have to replace the entire hub because you cam't remove the threaded ring that holds the bearing in place in order to press them out! The bearings are available for anywhere from $25 on up at any 'normal' auto parts store, but why provide a way to replace a $25 part when you can replace the whole hub for $200 - $250 instead!
(FYI - After I pulled the hubs & took them with me to Pep Boys to get the old bearings pressed out & the new ones pressed in, only to find out they couldn't, I took the hubs to the local dealership where I was told by the service mgr: We won't work on them if they're not on the car. One of the service techs came out to look at them to try and give me some advice and promptly said "I've never had to replace wheel bearings, they must not fail until after they're out of warranty".

3 - Timing belt - Belts are another one of those things that should get checked/replaced as part of regular maintenance, so why put one where you have to take off the front 1/3 of the engine to get to it?

4 - Remember I'm old - Why does the entire engine depend on a bunch of $1.98 sensors (that cost $80) to keep the damn thing running? After I spent $2K to have the timing belt, crank position sensor, and water pump replaced, the 2nd crank position sensor failed after less than a year, randomly crapping out & leaving my wife stranded (it's her car). I'd come to pick her up & sometimes the car would start right back up & run fine for several weeks, but 3 times we had it towed in to the shop where they couldn't reproduce the problem and it never threw an OBDCII code indicating a sensor failure. $700 later in labor & parts we have a new crank sensor that *seems* to be ok for now. Why were distributors so bad? Points, plugs, and condensers weren't that hard to replace, and timing lights are actually kind of fun to use.

Anyway, I've ranted enough for now.
 

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10 Optima LX, 07 Rondo EX, 89 Chevy C1500
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1,411 Posts
Sealed press in bearings, timing belt, and sensors that look cheaper than they list for are used by every manufacturer. If you had a Mitsubishi instead of a Kia, you'd be ranting on that forum right now. Or a Ford, and so on.

You better start buying old cars because there is nothing new that is going to make you happy.
 

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2003 Kia Sorento 2WD 3.5---- Now at the Junk yard
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62 Posts
I feel your pain buddy. Todays vehicles are pretty much left to the mechanics to repair. Even they have to hook them up to a computer to tell them what might be wrong. My abilities pretty much stop at changing the oil and filter. Even changing spark plugs has become a 3 to 4 hour job. I drive em but I don't even think about fixing em!
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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1,236 Posts
I suppose the wheel bearings were giving trouble. Funny, I've never had problems with wheel bearings and never had to pack/replace them.

I've been happy so far with our KIA Cerato 2.0, but reading this forum, I would be very wary of the SUV models. Sportage engines seems to have auto-disable features as standard. As for timing belts, that is the first question asked when considering any car. Synthetic belts are a disgusting alternative to a proper lubricated chain.
 

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2008 SpectraSX, 2014 Optima LX,2006 Jeep Liberty, Linux Mint Mate
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6,924 Posts
I go along with SpongeBob...
Almost all cars and vans with V6's are a bear to work on... Wheel bearings are usually not replaceable and if you do they will fail because you didn't install them right...
You are living in the world of the 60s and 70s. Todays cars are made to destroy themselves in accidents (to protect you while driving these "lighter" cars). They are lighter/safer/more efficient/and have many more accessories than your 64 could have ever had.

You said "After I spent $2K to have the timing belt, crank position sensor, and water pump replaced, the 2nd crank position sensor failed after less than a year, randomly crapping out & leaving my wife stranded"

You spending $2000 on TB/water pump/crank sensor is your own fault...No way can I add up those parts and labor and get even close to what you paid...
I would have replaced those parts myself...
Parts at RockAuto
Gates Timing belt Kit $85.
Gates Water Pump $65
Beck Arnley Crank sensor $69

I'm 63yrs and I'd do the above... Find a car TODAY that everything is the same as your 1964 car...They don't make them!
KIA/ Hyundai/Honda/Toyota/Mitsubishi/Subaru/Lexas/Ford/Chrysler/GM all charge ridiculous amounts for labor and parts...You will see that on your next car also.

There are a lot of top notch independent mechanics out there that would have done the above work for less than 1/3 of what you paid. (and they do not have "PEPBOYS" sewn onto their pockets)

We are here to keep you from spending the amounts you posted...
We would have also gone after the crank sensor on your first "help" post...

Your complaints are just that ..."complaints" and they will follow you through your many replacement car brands...
Dave
 

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2009 Sportage, 98 Sportage, 2012 Tata Xenon, 1944 Jeep
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515 Posts
You don't have to replace the whole hub - that is just lazy mechanic speak. The bearings just press out once you remove the snap ring. A while ago some one placed a very good guide on how to do this. In Jeeps and Ford Explorers you cannot just replace the bearing, you have to replace the whole hub. Ford 4 litre V6's were more prone to timing chain problems than any belt driven V6. Are they rubbish cars too?

As for electronically controlled engines, there was nothing wrong with carburettors, points, and distributors that EFI couldn't fix. Obviously you have forgotten the glory days of 10,000 mille plugs, points, condensor changes, engines that were worn out by 100,000 miles, and 10 MPG etc. I'm about the same age as you and I never want to go back to the "good old days"
 

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Sorento 2.5XS, Skoda Fabia, Ford Connect
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88 Posts
Don't buy the latest BMWs then....you don't even get a dipstick (except the one behind the wheel of course):D

I do sympathise but they are all the same, by design. As they are overall so much more reliable than your old Olds they have to dream up things to make you take it to the dealer. The Olds is far more fun though, a bit like my old Alfas which I loved to bits...literally:lol:

VW made Skodas 'better' , but I could fix a preVW Skoda easily and cheaply. Its a lot harder these days. I'm 58 these days so less inclined to go crawling underneath, but I still do when the madness takes me:eek:

Tim
 

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2011 Sorento EX
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33 Posts
My wife's Saturn has the same type of Wheel Hub you are talking about
My Audi Had the timing belt and tons of sensors
the new Audi, BMW, Some Chevy (and more to come) are all electronic Oil Systems which means No Dip Stick to monitor (like Alfie168 said)

It's part of the times and you just gotta get used to it. It's nothing specific to a KIA.
 
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