Kia Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
2011 Kia Sportage
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So its been some time with our 2011 AWD Kia Sportage. 2 years of time. Its served us well, as well as it can. But theres problems that I feel I may have contributed to and I'm seeking my fellow sportage owners for advice.

First, I looked over the forum and saw that some of you may have a camber issue or toe issue when it comes to tire wear. We first heard some serious road/tire noise approaching 30k and quickly ran to the tire shop (Mavis) for a full evaluation. Or course, replaced all 4/with alignment. Now at 65k, after 4 tire rotations, the wear is still there on all 4 and the noise is louder than ever.

I dont know if its a conspiracy but Im getting sick of this. I called Kia and was evaluated by phone that it may be the bearings in the hub thats needs to be replace. Appointment scheduled.

Now here is where I think I'm to blame. I do a lot of motorcycle racing and this poor sportage of mine pulls my motorcycles from state to state. Given my gear, motorcycles, trailer, and my wife as a passenger in the kia (lol), total weight on the drivetrain minus the sportage's, I estimated 1450 max. Would this cause me having to replace my hub bearings at 67k which kia already told me would not be covered?
 

·
Premium Member
2017 Kia Niro Touring w/Tech Pkg, Blue/Grey
Joined
·
1,887 Posts
Wow, after only 35,000 miles on a 2nd set of tires, you have tire wear?????

Got to be a conspiracy.........
 

·
Registered
2012 Sportage SX AWD
Joined
·
843 Posts
HA HA HA HA HA HA!

Seriously though, I don't think the OP is towing too much. Tire wear happens and it doesn't sound crazy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I've love to know how someone could diagnose bad wheel bearings without hearing or seeing it themselves. They made a random guess...

Some tires definitely get a lot noisier as they wear (even if not wearing unevenly), and being ready to replace at 30-35k isn't unusual either depending on the type & your driving habits. Add to that the Sportage doesn't have great sound insulation in the first place.
 

·
Registered
2011 Sportage EX 1.7cc Diesel - Manual transmission
Joined
·
154 Posts
I've love to know how someone could diagnose bad wheel bearings without hearing or seeing it themselves. They made a random guess...

Some tires definitely get a lot noisier as they wear (even if not wearing unevenly), and being ready to replace at 30-35k isn't unusual either depending on the type & your driving habits. Add to that the Sportage doesn't have great sound insulation in the first place.
There is an easy way to check for wheel bearing wear but you have to recognize and know the sound a wheel bearing makes. When a wheel bearing is worn it makes a humming noise, different noise from a tire on a road.
To determine if it is the tire try driving on different surfaces and try to note if the noise changes. If it does then it is the tire.
Now to check the bearings. Jack up the car start with any wheel you like and rotate that wheel by hand. You should hear the humming of a worn bearing when the wheel is turning. Now try to grab the wheel one hand at the top the other at the bottom and jerk the wheel one hand pushing and the other pulling. In extreme circumstances if the bearing is extensively worn you would feel and see the wheel moving, this should not be. Don't forget you have to put the car in neutral for the front wheels and remove the parking brake for the rear wheels and put jack stands under the car for safety.
Honestly, wheel bearings do not wear all 8 together, (there are 2 on every wheel) and sometimes you can determine which wheel has its bearings worn simply by driving.
Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
965 Posts
Probably a hub. Typically the noise will come in around 45 MPH. To rule out the tires as the source, set cold tire pressure at 28 and drive in the same place/speed where you usually hear the growl. If the noise goes away or greatly diminishes, it's the tires. If it doesn't, it's a bearing or multiple bearings. These usually cost about $400 ea. to replace.
Don't forget to pump your tires back up!

The tow weight would only be a factor if you have excessive tongue weight on the rear end. If you did, the rear of the car would be visibly lower. Cargo and passenger weight on the rear wheels would have to be added to the tongue weight. You can find the details for allowable weights in your manual. It is possible that even with that fairly light trailer you have exceeded the allowable weight increase on the rear end. Since you have put on many miles with this arrangement, I'm not surprised that a hub bearing is going out. Hub bearings can go out even with no overloading or towing at all. Sometimes they just don't last. I got very familiar with the modern sealed hub bearings with my 2003 Saturn VUE. They were notorious for early wheel bearing failure. I only had one go out by the time I traded it at about 85,000 miles, but owners on the Saturn forum were constantly reporting failures. Some had to replace several over a 90-day period, for example.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Towing strains the drivetrain, but the transmission long before wheel bearings. Bearings fail from contamination, dry friction, directional loads, vibration, manufacturing defects... As everyone is saying, that can't be identified by phone unless the wheel came off. Hopefully there's higher precision&tolerance bearings available.

For noise: soft tires, mass-loading mat, carpet, undercoating, and checking weatherstripping seals. Good luck at the mechanics'
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top