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Discussion Starter #21
After the "rebuild", I was going to post an account of all the work I did and if my original problem of excessive oil consumption was greatly reduced, if not halted altogether. Upon completion of my work, I test drove the vehicle locally and being satisfied with that outcome (at least then), took the vehicle on a road trip of approx. 400 miles. I felt this would be a good time to gather enough mileage to reset the IM monitors. The vehicle ran great, acceleration was good and there was no Check Engine Light (CEL) until the next time I started the engine which was the following morning. CEL code P0016. At this point in time, I had traveled about 110 miles of the 400 mile journey. Looking at the possible causes (see list below) and judging by the good response I was getting from the engine, I found it hard to accept the "incorrect timing" and "engine mechanical problems" as probable causes. The other listed causes did not seem to affect the vehicle performance. Each time my OBD-II code reader would let me clear the CEL and re-status these codes which should be eventually cleared as the IM monitors reset. But this scenario repeated itself over and over again. Every time I started the engine, the CEL would light.

P0016 KIA-Crankshaft Position-Camshaft Position Correction- Bank 1 Sensor 'A'

P0016 KIA Possible Causes
Faulty Crankshaft Position *
Crankshaft Position harness is open or shorted circuit.
Crankshaft Position circuit poor electrical connector
Faulty Camshaft Position*
Camshaft Position harness is open or shorted circuit.
Camshaft Position circuit poor electrical connector
Incorrect timing*
Engine mechanical problems*
Damaged Engine Control Module (ECM)



Once I arrived home, I started to investigate this issue further. I partially disassembled the engine and found I had not set the timing chain as I should have. The timing marks were close and not properly aligned as I thought they were (about 1 -2 teeth off). That issue was corrected. However, the P0016 code kept repeating. If you look at the list again, you will see two of the first four things mentioned are faulty crankshaft and camshaft position sensors. Since I don't possess a oscilloscope, I figured to change these sensors hoping to correct the problem. This is why I chose to do what I did. Sorry if I didn't mention it before now. I thought I had.

At this point, I'm willing to try anything to get this vehicle fixed. I will put the original camshaft sensors back in and see if there is any improvement. If I have to, I'll do the same with the original crankshaft sensor. I won't like it, but I'll do it. (It was a p.i.t.a. to replace.)

Thanks.

PS. BTW, the oil consumption improved somewhat. I only used 1 qt. during the 400 miles, as opposed to 1 qt. for the same110 mile portion of the trip on previous occasions.
 

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.... Since I don't possess a oscilloscope, I figured to change these sensors hoping to correct the problem. This is why I chose to do what I did. ....
Yes, replacing the sensors is probably the less expensive option, given what shops get per hour for labor these days. Unfortunately the down side is that you don't learn what the signals look like, and you're back to square one when the replacements don't work. You might try asking your local KIA service dept if they would be willing to just plug in their GDS tool, only read the cam and crank signals, and just charge you for that amount of time. They're probably going to say no, and try to sell you the full diagnostic instead, which would mean giving them your next born child as payment. But who knows, maybe you might find the rare friendly service guy willing to help out a DIYer.

How about doing another compression test? You have the compression before starting the job, so being able to compare the current readings might give you a helpful clue as to what's going on.

One other thing that comes to mind about the P0016 code is the oil control valves. The OCVs on these Thetas have some history of getting clogged up, and (sometimes) producing timing correlation DTCs such as the P0016. I didn't consider that high on the list in your case, simply because of the work related to the cams that you did. But it can't be eliminated as a possible cause, and checking the OCVs is something that you should consider doing, if nothing else helps.



.... the oil consumption improved somewhat. I only used 1 qt. during the 400 miles, as opposed to 1 qt. for the same110 mile portion of the trip on previous occasions.
This 'improved' oil usage is still terrible for any Theta engine, and for an MPI Theta is nothing short of ghastly. You didn't mention blue smoke from the exhaust, so I'm assuming there's not a noticeable amount of that. You said the compression and PCV system is ok, and you just did the valve seals. So where the hell is all of that oil going?

I'm thinking back to what you said about smelling oil burning after switching to a different high mileage oil. Not knowing the layout of your vehicle, I'll ask if it's possible there could a rear main seal leak which is dripping on the exhaust system, and burning off the oil before it can hit the ground. When a case like yours shows up, even the most remote possibilities get dredged up, regardless of how unlikely they may be.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
..Sorry, but spellcheck must have changed OCV into OCI. It was supposed to be OCV = oil control valve..
OVCs, not OVIs. Got it. I did consider the oil control valves as one of many options in the past and I'm glad you mentioned them. I will change the OVCs and keep my fingers crossed.

As a DYIer with a limited budget, you eventually ask yourself how far do I go changing out different 'probable causes' and when will I find the answer and end this. (That was me venting.)

I haven't yet put the original CMP sensors back in nor have I performed another compression test. I need to take break from all this and clear my head before I resume this effort. When I get back, I shall pick up where this left off, hopefully with a better perspective and better results.

Thanks for all of your help so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Changing out the OCVs, or so I thought. The OCV for the exhaust side was easy. Took two minutes. But the OCV on the Intake side is a pain. Why did they use a torx screw to secure the Intake OCV? Now I have to remove the power steering pump (PSP) to get better access to the torx screw holding the Intake OCV.

I removed the serpentine belt and three mounting bolts for the power steering pump. I tried to extract the PSP from the bracket, but the pump would not come out. Is there another bolt that I'm not aware of holding the pump in place?
 

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Changing out the OCVs, or so I thought. The OCV for the exhaust side was easy. Took two minutes. But the OCV on the Intake side is a pain. Why did they use a torx screw to secure the Intake OCV? Now I have to remove the power steering pump (PSP) to get better access to the torx screw holding the Intake OCV.

I removed the serpentine belt and three mounting bolts for the power steering pump. I tried to extract the PSP from the bracket, but the pump would not come out. Is there another bolt that I'm not aware of holding the pump in place?
From the photos it appears to have 3 mounting bolts only.

 

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Discussion Starter #28
Thanks, that confirms what I did. I can get the pump to rock back and forth, just not up and out. Seems to be stuck at the location of the bottom hole where the long bolt is assembled. Perhaps the pump just needs some gentle persuasion to be extracted. I'll let you know how that turns out.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Power steering pump just needed a little help with a pry bar and out it came, giving me access space to the torx screw. To remove the Intake OCV, I ended up drilling a hole in the mounting screw using a 7/64" dia. drill bit and removing the screw with a spiral-fluted screw extractor.

One other thing that comes to mind about the P0016 code is the oil control valves. The OCVs on these Thetas have some history of getting clogged up, and (sometimes) producing timing correlation DTCs such as the P0016.
In one of your earlier posts, you mentioned a connection with P0016 code and OCVs. I happen to come across a
a KIA technical service bulletin (#KT2009050801) that addresses this. I found it quite interesting. You may want to read it for future reference.

Anyhow, the new Intake OCV is installed and it now has a hex head mounting screw securing it. I'm hoping this is the last bit of work I need to do to this vehicle for a long while. As was requested earlier, I will follow up and provide a "report/summary", involving all that transpired, at a later date. It will especially include the replacement of the 16 valve stem seals (which is where this all started about a month ago) and the effect of that replacement (if any) regarding the initial problem of excessive oil usage.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
FYI................................................
Don't know how I missed this before especially with changing a bunch of items with this motor, but I noticed that I have a crack in the exhaust manifold converter fairly close to the upstream O2 sensor. I'm assuming this would somewhat account for the smell of burnt oil that I've been getting. Anybody have an idea on what related effect, if any, this "cracking" would have with what I've been experiencing?

Also, and on a related note, I may have neglected to mention this but one of the earliest engine codes I got was a P0420 code, which steered me to change out the O2 sensors at the vary start of this "repair". More of my research with the 'cracking' shows engine codes P0420 popping up in the info I'm reading. Starting to feel that too much information may be a bad thing. Am I just going in circles or what? Anybody?
 
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