Kia Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an 04 Rio with 135000 km on it. I drive about 200 - 300 km/day and i am losing about 1 - 2 litres of antifreeze per week. Is it ok to fix a small leak like this with a radiator stop leak product.
 

·
Registered
2K13 Forte SX Lux yada yada yada...
Joined
·
151 Posts
On my old 97 Nissan, I had a similar leak. A new rad (aftermarket) was north of 700++. I went into my local shop and bought this tube of 'stop leak' and poured some in (can't remember if it was half or full tube) and I kid you not - the leak stopped!

This was a temporary fix that lasted about two years! Eventually the crack that joined the rad to the inlet pipe grew too big for the stop leak power to work. If anything, it bought me time to figure out a better deal or part source the rad.

No harm experience in using the magic powder.
 

·
Registered
2012 Kia Soul+, Kia Sportage SX FWD
Joined
·
472 Posts
Why don't you simply locate the leak, and fix it? Although stop-leak might temporarily fix your issue, it doesn't permanently solve anything. It also coats the internals of the cooling system (including radiator tube surfaces) and reduces the exchange of heat that should be happening. Often , the addition of goop to stop small leaks ends up creating a bigger problem with the cooling. Smaller systems are especially vulnerable. If you feel you MUST try some, please start with a "partial dose", and not the whole container the first time around. Bars Leak has worked for me in the past, but use sparingly!
 

·
Registered
2K13 Forte SX Lux yada yada yada...
Joined
·
151 Posts
Most rad leaks are not worth repairing IF they really are 'repairable'. I had no issues using the powder and it works. The logic of ruining your cooling system is offset by the fact the rad is already going south. The high cost alone is worth trying this first.
 

·
Super Moderator
1995 Procharged Mustang Cobra, 2021 Sportage EX
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Most rad leaks are not worth repairing IF they really are 'repairable'. I had no issues using the powder and it works. The logic of ruining your cooling system is offset by the fact the rad is already going south. The high cost alone is worth trying this first.
We don't even know where the OP lives. Just because the rad in your country is cazy money, dosn't mean it's that much everywere! A rad (brand new aftermarket) for the op's car in USA is a little more than $100.00.
 

·
Registered
2K13 Forte SX Lux yada yada yada...
Joined
·
151 Posts
We don't even know where the OP lives. Just because the rad in your country is cazy money, dosn't mean it's that much everywere! A rad (brand new aftermarket) for the op's car in USA is a little more than $100.00.
True, but I was referring to the cost of my old Nissan and not the OPs.

IF the OP could source the new rad and have it installed for one benji, then sure it's quite obvious in what direction to proceed with.

But from my own experience and my understanding, assuming he can find an aftermarket rad, parts, labor etc, this will not be the case for the OP.

 

·
Registered
2012 Kia Soul+, Kia Sportage SX FWD
Joined
·
472 Posts
OP never specified the leak was in the radiator...just that he was losing coolant. My question is where? cap? hoses? heater core? If leak is in radiator, then yes replace it, but often leaks are simply a matter of changing a hose or tightening a clamp or getting a new cap. That was my logic in saying find and fix, rather than just dump in stop leak. I do agree that repairing a radiator is not as smart a choice as replacement.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top