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Sorento 2016 SX V6
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Discussion Starter #1
I've got as '16 Sorento V6. I have been changing the oil myself by pumping it out through the dipstick tube to avoid having to remove the splash shield under the engine/transmission. It has appeared that I might not be getting all of the old oil out, so yesterday I decided to remove the shield and maybe install a Fumoto drain valve fitting. Big mistake. They turned out to be rusty. About eight of the 20 (?) or so bolts came out OK before two ripped the nut plates loose from whatever they are in and just spun. Another one pulled the nut plate off entirely and fell out on the ground. So now I've got a splash shield I can't remove. Have any of you had this problem and what did you do? I can keep pumping he oil out for the time being, but sooner or later I will need to address this. I wonder how much it would have cost Kia to use stainless bolts?

Larry
 

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2019 Sorento LX AWD 3.3L
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71 Posts
Believe it was designed to be removed regularly as part of the oil change. Regular removal would help preclude corroding of bolts/threads. Once you get it off (may require drills etc) I recommend getting replacement bolts and nut plates. You could go for the added expense of stainless, but you'll want to be sure the bolt is the same material as the nut in the plate as dissimilar metals can also corrode. Try adding a touch of some thread protectant too.

Good luck
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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I've got as '16 Sorento V6. I have been changing the oil myself by pumping it out through the dipstick tube to avoid having to remove the splash shield under the engine/transmission. It has appeared that I might not be getting all of the old oil out, so yesterday I decided to remove the shield and maybe install a Fumoto drain valve fitting. Big mistake. They turned out to be rusty. About eight of the 20 (?) or so bolts came out OK before two ripped the nut plates loose from whatever they are in and just spun. Another one pulled the nut plate off entirely and fell out on the ground. So now I've got a splash shield I can't remove. Have any of you had this problem and what did you do? I can keep pumping he oil out for the time being, but sooner or later I will need to address this. I wonder how much it would have cost Kia to use stainless bolts?
I would not recommend the drain valve. The conditions are generally too harsh for it imo. They're definitely more prone to leaking than the plug & metal gasket (which comes free with your oil filter). For your daily driver, err on the side of safety, not convenience, when it comes to maintenance.

For the stripped bolts, I've had the same issue a couple times (and I change the oil every 5k miles). I got them out with a screw extractor, and didn't replace them. I think right now, a total of maybe 10-12 bolts hold the undercover on just fine. But I was fortunate that none of the front-most bolts had this issue (otherwise, I would have re-tapped those holes).
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
Imagine my surprise when we settled on a new Sorento V6 with fond memories of top-mounted filters on previous Hyundais, only to discover the "new normal" of bottom-mounted filters secured by seven million bolts. Ah well, the Topsider had a good run.

There will be a special trophy for whoever posts pics of a reliable access panel modification. 🏆
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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1,293 Posts
Yes, definitely got spoiled by the top spin version on the previous 3.3. Always wondered why it couldn't have always been that easy, and poof -- we're back to the 1900's again.
 

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Sorento LX V6 2018
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521 Posts
Do we know yet why the filter was moved to the bottom of the engine? Someone thought it was because of the 8 speed automatic and how you would access it for filling/checking purposes but I don't know if that was ever validated. Just curious as it generally isn't cheap to retool something like that without a very good reason to do so.
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
Not sure why they moved it, but one benefit might be improved oil priming/anti-drainback. The top mounted filters didn't always hold their oil after shutdown in my experience.
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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1,293 Posts
The 3.3 Lambda MPi G6DB is the previous generation 3.3L, and is the one those with the prior generation 3.3L Hyundai vehicles will remember (e.g., CM series Santa Fe owners). That's where the top mounted cartridge filter was so sweet. Do not be fooled by the fact that the displacement of the current 3.3L is the same as the older one.

The Hyundai/Kia models were beginning to be integrated in the U.S. in 2010, which is when the newer 3.5L V6 engines came on line for the Santa Fe, and hence also the Sorento.

As of 2012 (starting in the Azera) Hyundai began a return to a 3.3L which eventually found its way into the Santa Fe in 2013 and into the Sorento for 2014. This current 3.3L Lambda II GDI G6DH version got GDI and a number of other changes, including a new chain drive variable displacement oil pump whose plumbing may have something to do with the way the filter is situated now.
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
Make a couple of holes and this becomes a non-issue.
Problem up here is that road salt gets sucked into the engine bay, turning things into a crusty, rusty DIY nightmare within a few years. Since this car is a keeper I'd rather deal with the 17 bolts. But I'll see if I can McGyver something next time I need a 2-beer weekend project.
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
Cancel McGyver. It took me about the same amount of time to remove & replace the cover (using a cordless driver) as it takes me to brush my teeth.

It's nice to see that H/K still uses steel hex bolts for parts like this, instead of plastic clips. Should hold up to years of service, with nothing more than the occasional shot of rust spray.
 

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2016 Kia Sorento LX (..and also drove a 2004.5 Spectra for 13+ years / 127k great miles)
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54 Posts
I looked today, and my Kia dealership appears to have cut a hole - slightly bigger than the filter - in the panel. That's a fairly recent addition I think, because I checked several times after the first few changes, and it wasn't there. It also appears that a few of the bolts were omitted for reinstallation during early visits, in an effort to speed up the process. We've got the 2.4L.

-SM2016
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
That's strange, but not so bad assuming you have the steel canister filter. With the V6 it's a plastic housing that would be quite vulnerable if left open.
 

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2019 Kia Sorento LX V6 AWD
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1 Posts
Imagine my surprise when we settled on a new Sorento V6 with fond memories of top-mounted filters on previous Hyundais, only to discover the "new normal" of bottom-mounted filters secured by seven million bolts. Ah well, the Topsider had a good run.

There will be a special trophy for whoever posts pics of a reliable access panel modification. 🏆
How about keeping the splash guard off the car? Would this create issues?
 

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2020 Sorento 3.3 AWD
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34 Posts
How about keeping the splash guard off the car? Would this create issues?
Not an issue in Florida. Up here in the salt belt, however, the splash guard helps keep the engine bay clean and corrosion-free for a few extra years.
 

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2016 Sorento EX V6
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614 Posts
Not an issue in Florida. Up here in the salt belt, however, the splash guard helps keep the engine bay clean and corrosion-free for a few extra years.
Pretty sure they have splashes and air down there..... would be be a bad idea to keep it on. They still will have grit/dirty getting up in the engine more without it and some MPG penalty (be it possibly small). Also, it provides some small level of protection to the oil pan and low hanging components.
 

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Not sure why they moved it, but one benefit might be improved oil priming/anti-drainback. The top mounted filters didn't always hold their oil after shutdown in my experience.
The most proper & feaseable answer. 2nd party / aftermarket high efficiency oil filters were a big problem for the Korean automakers several years ago. Fram Ultras were giving engine techs & engineers fits.

On our 2020 Soul 2.0 MPI, the oil drain plug and oil filter are only an arm's reach away from each other. Oil changes are so simple & quick. Four quarts & eight ounces of oil put the dipstick on the full-mark. Now if you want the engine to wear a Fram Ultra, Purolator One or Mobil-1 EP oil filter, you can and the engine's pumping system handles them fine.
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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1,293 Posts
Not sure why they moved it, but one benefit might be improved oil priming/anti-drainback. The top mounted filters didn't always hold their oil after shutdown in my experience.
Just noticed this post (a little late). IIRC, those situations were largely a function of some non-OEM filter kits, weren't they? I never saw that complaint with the yellow "Made in Korea" filters, which is why we always suggested to stick with those.
 

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2016 Sorento SX Turbo AWD (sold)
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800 Posts
I would not recommend the drain valve. The conditions are generally too harsh for it imo. They're definitely more prone to leaking than the plug & metal gasket (which comes free with your oil filter). For your daily driver, err on the side of safety, not convenience, when it comes to maintenance.
I've used them for over 30 years including the Sorento and never had one leak or fail in any way. But I dont do rock crawling or desert racing with my vehicles so that might be the reason.
 
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