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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I replaced the water pump and when I went to put a new timing belt on, I turned the cam sprockets independently of each other, maybe, probably all of them. At first the crankshaft pulley would hit the valves when I turned by hand, but after lining the marks up everything turned freely. I put it all together and it started but only when I pressed the gas pedal down half way.
It runs for a brief minute and shut off. I have searched these forms and noticed that one member mentioned that someone else with similar problems
would have to remove the valve covers and set the valves correctly ( by turning the sprockets back into correct position). My question is, is that correct that my valves are in wrong position even though timing marks on the outside line up?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Co-worker mentioned that I might just be off with the CS. Said it might be tdc on the wrong stroke. Can anyone tell me, if the cams timing marks are in line with the head marks, are the valves in the right spot, I mean like if you turn the cs over one complete
turn, then your piston would go from tdc to bdc. Is it the same with the cam? If I turn the sprocket one complete turn are the valves in the same spot or 180 off?
 

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'02 Sedona 3.5L
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I turned the cam sprockets independently of each other, maybe, probably all of them.
When you turn the sprockets independently, did you just turn it to align the mark as it slipped an inch or so off the mark? It is not likely anyone with the right mind to turn it more then that. If you did then you need a service manual or an experienced mechanic to have it align.

So I think the timing might have been off just a bit or not at all. First check to see if you plug everything back to where they should.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah Bruce, I never said I was in my right mind:)

I have been doing many projects at the same time along with working nights and I think I turned the firewall sprockets all the way around but can't remember. These were the ones that were not on the marks and as I turned it to get it on the marks they kept springing past along with scraped knuckles because I wasn't expecting that. I went to the Kia InfoTech.com and also bought a service manual online today, which was pretty much the same thing as the free version from Kia. I don't know how many times I turned the CS either because there was a time where it was being stopped by the valves. Any way the only reference to possibly lining the valves up correctly refers to dowel pins in the ends of the cam shafts and the angle of there location, but the service manual does not specify if it is for timing. It just says line up the sprocket timing marks with the marks on the head and make sure your #1 piston is tdc on the compression stroke. So I wonder if it is really just that maybe I am in the wrong tdc stroke and the cam sprockets return the valves back to the same spot every rotation?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So, I guess if the cam shaft was turned There is no information on how to align the valves back in sync with the pistons unless a mechanic at the dealership rapes me for $4,000 with information that he alone has, or just scrap the thing. For real, I thought this blog site was for diy people trying to save money and not being told to take it to mechanic. There has to be more informative info on how to time this engine other than (DON'T TURN CAMS AFTER BELT IS OFF OR YOU WILL HAVE TO SCRAP VEHICLE).
 

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Should eng. start without intake manifold?

Hello, I replaced the water pump on my 03 Sedona 3.5L, but in the process of finding the leak, I tore a lot down that started with the intake because I thought the leak was under it. Anyway after putting the timing belt back on and all back together. It wont idle. It will start and idle rough for two to three seconds and it will stay running if I press the gas pedal and make it run above 2000 rpm. I am now not sure if it is the timing off a little or if it is a sensor or idle motor. Should the engine idle if the upper intake is off and all the wires unplugged from it? I should also mention that it will run (high rpm)with it off if I am spraying starting fluid in the lower intake. Does this sound like timing off and if so I heard of mechanics retarding the timing a little. All my marks are dead on, so if I was to retard it, which way should the mark be on the crankshaft?
Any ideas would be appreciated.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L, 17 Ford Edge Sport 2.7L V6, 15 Mustang 3.7L V6, 2013 BMW K1600 GTL
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Sounds like a short run with incorrect valve timing could have damaged one or more valves.

The best would be to perform a wet and dry compression test and the results of that will dictate the next steps.

Have you tried using the Kiatech.com web site for detailed instructions with very useful images etc. ? - see my sig for the link.


PS. You'd be best served to keep it to one thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
UPDATE:

I just want to clarify that when changing your water pump and/or your timing belt that it
does not matter if your sprockets and crankshaft turn independently. I have searched this issue and found that many people believe that it messes your timing up where you have to either pull your valve covers off or take it to a mechanic to get it in the right time again, THIS IS NOT TRUE!
All you have to do is align your marks up that are on the sprockets with the ones on the valve cover and the mark on your crankshaft with the block. That puts you back in time on the correct stroke every time, regardless of turning anything. I wanted to post this because the misconception confused the heck out of me from the start. And Ron thanks for the info, I checked compression and all was good. I just had a separate issue as I messed up and had washers in between intake and purge tank causing air leak which ran rough.
 

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The Cam timing always matches the crankshaft timing. The only exception is if the timing sensor plate is not lined up with the crankshaft sprocket. Most mechanics don't know this. I'll explain at the end.

Setting the timing is pretty straight forward. Line up the timing mark on the crankshaft, set the belt and brace it from the bottom with a piece of Styrofoam or cardboard. Wrap the belt around the upper bearing and front outer cam, adjust the timing marks and pull belt tight continue on to the 2nd front cam, hold this in place with a clip or clothes pin. The belt goes down around the water pump and up the rear cam. Using a 17mm wrench, turn the cam to the timing mark, wrap the belt and tightly to the timing mark, holding both the belt and cam in place. (It helps if you can get a helper). Next, do the same with the far rear cam, align it to the timing mark and wrap the belt around it. Pull the belt from the bottom to hold the cams and belt in place. Place a clip or clamp on the bottom of the back cam with belt to hold it in place. Release the belt and cam and check your timing marks, it should hold itself. Next, wrap the belt around the bottom adjustment bearing. Adjust the bearing with a needle nose pliers and a 14mm socket, rotate the adjuster with the pliers to tighten the belt, hold it tightly while tightening the center bolt. Belt and bolt should be snug, repeat if necessary. Install the auto adjuster (pin in) beneath the adjustment bearing. Remove the clips from the cams. Next, rotate the crankshaft a couple of turns to insure the cams and pistons don't interfere with each other. Rotate the crankshaft to its timing mark and recheck the timing mark on each of the cams. If everything looks in order, pull the pin on the auto adjuster, remove the styro, put the lower cover on and the harmonic balancer, inside, outside belts and everything else back together. I've done this by myself about a half dozen times. It gets easier each time.

Special Note: If you find that your engine is not running right, recheck your timing. I had one situation that despite my best effort, the engine stayed out of time. After looking at the timing mark pictures on the KiaTechInfo site, I noticed that the back sensing blade behind the crank sprocket had slipped and did not match up correctly. I had to pry the sprocket and sensing blade off the shaft, then realign and secure them together or replace them.
 

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Need help. Have always worked on cars and many timing jobs over the years. This is my first Kia. Anyway everything worked out perfectly but have noticed after it sits a while the tensioner collapse some allowing the belt to rest loose. Is this normal for the Kia? I have rechecked everything and even tested with the old tensioner same thing. I install the belt correctly and everything is right and no slack. When I turn it counter clockwise it moves in a hair (tensioner) and pops back out as it should on clockwise. If I let it sit a while and come back the belt has some slack on water pump shaft !! Never seen this before. Volvos use the same tensioner design and never seen it there either. Anyone?
 
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