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Discussion Starter #1
The timing chain doesn't have different colored links on the chain (that I can see), so there is really no way to use the chain to align with the marks on the sprockets. Has anyone done a timing job on this model?
 

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Although this could be done, its not industry standard.
What is important is the teeth on each cam sprocket and their relationship to each other and the crank shaft sprocket.
Cam timing is very important. Be sure you get it correct.
Get ahold of a good repair manual and read up on cam timing.
Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Although this could be done, its not industry standard.
What is important is the teeth on each cam sprocket and their relationship to each other and the crank shaft sprocket.
Cam timing is very important. Be sure you get it correct.
Get ahold of a good repair manual and read up on cam timing.
Good Luck!
I have the Kia manual for the 2008 Sorento.

This issue Im having is resetting the timing. The Timing Marks are off on the Sprockets so the Intake and the Exhausts do not line up. I currently have the crankshaft set at 0 and Cylinder #1 is a Top Dead Center. Questions is do I need to loosen the camshafts bearing caps and manually turn the sprockets (with the chain off) to set them to the right marks?
 

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I have the Kia manual for the 2008 Sorento.

This issue Im having is resetting the timing. The Timing Marks are off on the Sprockets so the Intake and the Exhausts do not line up. I currently have the crankshaft set at 0 and Cylinder #1 is a Top Dead Center. Questions is do I need to loosen the camshafts bearing caps and manually turn the sprockets (with the chain off) to set them to the right marks?
Don't loosen the cam caps. Not necessary. You can rotate the cams via the shaft itself. Look for a set of flats somewhere on the cam shaft that will allow you to put a wrench on to rotate it. Both the intake and exhaust cams should have these flats. You need to overcome the valve spring force, but that should not take too much effort. You need to know where the 'dots' need to be in relationship to the crank at TDC. Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Don't loosen the cam caps. Not necessary. You can rotate the cams via the shaft itself. Look for a set of flats somewhere on the cam shaft that will allow you to put a wrench on to rotate it. Both the intake and exhaust cams should have these flats. You need to overcome the valve spring force, but that should not take too much effort. You need to know where the 'dots' need to be in relationship to the crank at TDC. Hope this helps!
I can move the cams via the 14mm bot in the front of each. AT TDC, The whole intake cam on the left side (Cyclinder #1 ) moves and I can put it at the right spot for the marks. The exhaust cam freely spins by hand because only the front rocker is moving. On the right side, I going to assume I'm going to have to move cylinder #4 (intake) to TDC to align that side.....correct?
 

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Don't move the crank. Both banks of cams need to be in synchronous relationship with the crankshaft or the engine may not run smoothly, or not at all. Rotate the cams only. Because these engines are 'interference' designed, very low squish area (aka valves can hit pistons) use due care when spinning the crank or cams. A piston at TDC (either intake or exhaust) can contact the valves if your not careful.
Valve stems can bend easily. Don't force things into place! Good luck. You can do this!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Don't move the crank. Both banks of cams need to be in synchronous relationship with the crankshaft or the engine may not run smoothly, or not at all. Rotate the cams only. Because these engines are 'interference' designed, very low squish area (aka valves can hit pistons) use due care when spinning the crank or cams. A piston at TDC (either intake or exhaust) can contact the valves if your not careful.
Valve stems can bend easily. Don't force things into place! Good luck. You can do this!
#1 How do I get the right side aligned if they are stuck (hitting the pistons)? Do I go back 45 degrees (counterclockwise) then move forward?

#2 On the left side, do I worry about only the first rocker moving on the exhaust after I align the intake side? (remember, cylinder 1 is at TDC.)

Edit: I saw a video for another engine and the guy said I need to move the crankshaft 90 degrees from TDC before moving the cams. Move it back after adjusting the sprockets.
 

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In this case yes, move the crank and then move it back. Other ways which work are to align the cams with the heads off the block. Or you can loosen the cam caps to prevent the cam from opening the valve all the way. Normally 10mm will suffice, but all OHC engines are different. Your second question, depends on the firing order and how the cylinders are numbered....
I prefer to align the cams with the heads off the block. But, not always possible.

ps....do this without the timing belt installed or you will never get the proper time.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Besides the timing marks, is there a way to know if the timing is done properly (besides putting everything back together...and starting)? Looking at the camshaft themselves?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
In this case yes, move the crank and then move it back. Other ways which work are to align the cams with the heads off the block. Or you can loosen the cam caps to prevent the cam from opening the valve all the way. Normally 10mm will suffice, but all OHC engines are different. Your second question, depends on the firing order and how the cylinders are numbered....
I prefer to align the cams with the heads off the block. But, not always possible.

ps....do this without the timing belt installed or you will never get the proper time.

Well...background. This Sorento died on my daughter about 8 months ago while driving. I've not had time to really look at it after taking everything off after I figured out I need to remove the timing cover. A couple of broken chain guide, tensioner, and tension arm on both chains (but no broken chain) led me to believe the chain or chains go loose.

But trying to do what I was doing in this thread, I found the real culprit after I removed one of the chains. I mentioned earlier that the exhaust cam was only moving one of the lobes and moved freely. Freely by hand. Yep, a broken camshaft seems to be in the issue. I'm going to remove the bearing caps and verify. I'm just trying to find the sequence to remove them.
 

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Crap! That is not a good sign....broken camshaft.

BTW, no issue with any special sequence to remove the cam caps. Just make sure you put them back in the exact same position and same journal. The caps should already be marked with a number (1E, 2E, etc.) and an arrow pointing to the front of the engine from the factory. If not, clean the top of the cap and mark with a magic marker as described. When re-torquing start in the middle and work your way out to the ends with three seperate and progressive torque levels, finishing to PP specifications. Double check your torque reading.

Be sure to lube the lower cam half round and cap with good quality synthetic motor oil prior to installing a new (used) camshaft.

Now, a broken cam is not very common. Pieces of the cam may have found their way into other rotating and reciprocating engine components. Other parts close by may have been damaged by the initial event. Look all the parts over very carefully!

Once you get the broken cam out look closely for any missing pieces. If you can't come up with all the parts and pieces that spells trouble, and a whole new set of procedures you will need to follow.....
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Crap! That is not a good sign....broken camshaft.

BTW, no issue with any special sequence to remove the cam caps. Just make sure you put them back in the exact same position and same journal. The caps should already be marked with a number (1E, 2E, etc.) and an arrow pointing to the front of the engine from the factory. If not, clean the top of the cap and mark with a magic marker as described. When re-torquing start in the middle and work your way out to the ends with three seperate and progressive torque levels, finishing to PP specifications. Double check your torque reading.

Be sure to lube the lower cam half round and cap with good quality synthetic motor oil prior to installing a new (used) camshaft.

Now, a broken cam is not very common. Pieces of the cam may have found their way into other rotating and reciprocating engine components. Other parts close by may have been damaged by the initial event. Look all the parts over very carefully!

Once you get the broken cam out look closely for any missing pieces. If you can't come up with all the parts and pieces that spells trouble, and a whole new set of procedures you will need to follow.....
Snapped under the first bearing cap. The only damage I see is in the cavity were the cam shaft sits.






The question would sanding down the imperfections in the metal on the cylinder head be enough....or do I have to replace the cylinder head?
 

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I looked over your photos.

Time for a new (used) cylinder head at the very least. I can guarantee debris has entered the oil feed system for the cylinder head. At this point you have three options.

1. Look for a used cylinder head assembly in a salvage yard or reman shop.
2. Look for a used engine assembly in a salvage yard.
3. Purchase a certified reman engine from either Jasper or Powertrain Products. It all depends on how much you need this vehicle or how much you are in love with it.

You may get away with a cylinder head R & R, but my guess is the engine oil passages are contaminated with debris. Pumping this debris around the engine when you fire it up will only create additional (new) issues.

If you proceed with the head R&R be sure to flush all oil feed holes out with Kerosene. Dump the oil, flush the engine out with Kerosene. Pray you did not get any debris into the oil pump. If you did, the engine is not far from being scrap.

Its a tough call at this point. Lots of us have been there. When do you 'cut your losses and ditch the vehicle' is a hard decision. Especially if funds are tight.

Good luck....let us know what you decide to do.
 
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