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2017 Kia Niro Touring w/Tech Pkg, Blue/Grey
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If you don't drive the EPA cycle, you won't get EPA estimates................
 

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The only way I get EPA is if drive 55-60 on the freeway cruise control. And Drive very calmly on the street.

I blame the 18" wheels because I know KIA gave EPA the 16" that would boost mileage a lot compared to the 18".



Like In my corolla, I had 17" rims... and was getting below 34-35 HWY, now I put back the 15" stock rims and go to 38-39 hwy...

I'm sure its the same on the Sportage.. with light weight 16" rims we would get better mileage.
 

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2011 Sportage SX FWD, 2018 Niro PHEV EX Premium
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The only way I get EPA is if drive 55-60 on the freeway cruise control. And Drive very calmly on the street.

I blame the 18" wheels because I know KIA gave EPA the 16" that would boost mileage a lot compared to the 18".



Like In my corolla, I had 17" rims... and was getting below 34-35 HWY, now I put back the 15" stock rims and go to 38-39 hwy...

I'm sure its the same on the Sportage.. with light weight 16" rims we would get better mileage.
You know that if the overall diameter of your tires change, your odometer reading will change too. Now, it could be that the larger rims combined with lower profile tires meant that the overall diameter did not change much, but if it did, it would effect your MPG readings if you used the car's odometer. If you used GPS or mile markers and calculated that way, it wouldn't matter what size tire you had.
 

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Wheel weight takes more energy to rotate. Overall diameter would matter, but the wheel-tire size ratio should have kept the diameter difference insignificant.

If you don't drive the EPA cycle, you won't get EPA estimates.
And there it is. EPA numbers are often absurdly generous. They had to revise the test a few years ago, being too unrepresentative of normal driving.

Kia can cite EPA ratings. They could site my post here, saying the Sportage weighs seventeen pounds. The problem is EPA, and my definition of weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I know that on my Rondo, with the 2.7 V6, I have never been able to squeeze out the city or highway mileage even with very light throttles and a lot of coasting.
 

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2012 Sportage SX AWD Mineral Silver
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I get exactly as cited on my 2012 SX. In fact on my way home last weekend on a 100 mile trip back, cruise set to 72, I was averaging 29.8 mpg. City driving I average about 22 -23. I probably drive a little faster than I should and I do like to give it a little at a stop light. But I don't punch to the floor very often. As far as I am concerned, it does as advertised.
 

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2011 Sportage SX FWD, 2018 Niro PHEV EX Premium
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Yeah, it seems like my mileage has gotten better after the car had some miles put on it. (Just turned over 10,000 today!) Went on a couple of long road trips in the last couple months and averaged 28mpg and 29.5mpg on each trip. (Approximately 90% freeway and 10% in town.) Those figures were from the onboard computer only, so take with a large grain of salt!! (ie; subtract a couple mpg)
 

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2012 Sportage SX AWD
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If you don't drive the EPA cycle, you won't get EPA estimates................
Agreed. I hope that the case is laughed out of court. Too many crybabies don't seem to have a grasp on the word "estimate". Besides, that is the EPA estimate, sue them.

We can all thank that liberal douche judge out in Cali that ruled in favor of the lady who was crying about her MPGs in her Prius or whatever it was she owned.

I say car makers take that off the window stickers, make no claims about mileage and then people will have one less thing to bitch about. Plus it will save our justice system some time with not having to deal with all the frivolous lawsuits.

It would be nice if the vast majority of owners who were in fact getting the advertised mileage could send in affidavits in support of the car makers. Once a judge sees that 97% of owners are right where they should be and only a few squeaky wheels are complaining, it should be enough evidence to toss their case.

EDIT - How the hell are they getting less than 16mpg in the city with a Sportage? I don't get that in my SX even with a heavy right foot. Maybe they sit at red lights, put it in N and floor the engine while waiting for the light to change.
 

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98 Honda CR-V, 08 GMC CC, 96 Camry Coupe V6, 11 Kia Sportage EX AWD
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We don't get the MPG the EPA estimates with our Sportage.
We really didn't believe what the window sticker said we'd get when we bought it. :rolleyes:

All manufactures lie like dogs when it's comes to gas mileage expectations :mad:

Never the less, We're very pleased with our 2011 Sportage EX :D
 

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2012 Sportage SX AWD
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^That's the spirit! ;)

Seriously, people just have way too much time on their hands and get all bent over the smallest things. ZOMG the sticker says 30 and I am getting 26. Who cares?
 

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2011 KIA Sportage SX, 2016 Ford Focus RS
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EDIT - How the hell are they getting less than 16mpg in the city with a Sportage? I don't get that in my SX even with a heavy right foot. Maybe they sit at red lights, put it in N and floor the engine while waiting for the light to change.
I would bet that number represents what they got for a day of track testing.
 

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2011 KIA Sportage SX, 2016 Ford Focus RS
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The test numbers still don't really mean anything. If the magazine had mileage info on the other cars they might have used that, and if they hadn't done much testing on the Kia they would use the number from track day. Magazines are full of this kind of discrepancy so unless they specifically say something about fuel economy I wouldn't trust the numbers. Especially since they don't mention in the test anything about dismal fuel economy.
 

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The EPA estimates are useful. Like many others, I found my mileage rising around 10,000 miles, to the point that I now get 25-26 normal combined, and I have seen 30 on the computer during a road trip over a distance of about 100 miles (250 mile trip each way). I blew the opportunity to get an actual mileage on that tank, which was all-highway, because I was in a hurry to get home and didn't fill up until driving around a few days, but I remember well that I had over 400 miles on that tank.
The estimates are useful because they are all based on the same conditions. Therefore, you can use them as a yardstick with which to compare relative fuel consumption when car-shopping. This means that if car 'A' shows a combined mileage of 22, and car 'B' shows 27, you know that you will get about 5 mpg more with 'B' under all conditions. The fact that you may never test the car under the exact same conditions as the EPA is meaningless. They teasted it, they got what they got, and test them all the same way. What more could you want? Would you feel better if the manufacturer did the same thing and got the same result? Would it be better if they hired an independant company to do the same thing? 'Real-world' results is an impossibility. Joe Blow loves to get good mileage and does everything possible to get it, including risking death on the freeway by driving 50 mph. His mileage exceeds the EP estimate. I, on the other hand, generally drive like a maniac and get a little less than the estimate much of the time. Which 'real-world' result should we use?
This is why scientists came up with the method used, which is about as good as it gets as far as uniformity is concerned. The numbers have meaning and can be trusted.
 

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Thank that liberal douche judge out in Cali that ruled in favour of the lady crying about her MPGs in her Prius or whatever it was.
If it was Prius, I begin to understand. It's marketed as man's gift to Earth, when that's highly arguable. Sportage isn't an ecocar, but a lightweight low-displacement CUV, saving more energy than what we're used to. Non-NorthAmericans will say good things about the diesel version, although they're used to good gas mileage.

Considering the sales&prestige of the Prius, I'm shocked VW never introduced the Polo Bluemotion worldwide, 85.6mpg (70/91mpg). I'm told it doesn't meet NA regulations.

Which 'real-world' result should we use?
This is why scientists came up with the method used, which is about as good as it gets as far as uniformity is concerned. The numbers have meaning and can be trusted.
Well, if results are relative to infinitely-variable conditions, then any MPG rating is inaccurate. If the absolute rating number is inapplicable, it needs a relative rating. The easiest way might be to compare an individual car to the average of all cars tested. That makes one car's fuel economy instantly understandable in the market, and would increase competition to be above average. Being relative, positions would change each year, but they've revised the absolute rating before. It also wouldn't work when all cars are terrible, but the industry has changed since the 1970's ;)
 

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Kind of off topic, but for some reason, I see a lot of Prius owners driving the crap out of them. Seriously, like on the highway, doing 80+. I kind of want to ask them if they realize that they are defeating the purpose of the car by going that speed. Sure, they are probably still getting better mileage than a Tahoe going 80+, still, I thought the idea was to get 40mpg or more.

Plus most Prius owners are like BMW owners, pretentious douchers.

Well, if results are relative to infinitely-variable conditions, then any MPG rating is inaccurate. If the absolute rating number is inapplicable, it needs a relative rating. The easiest way might be to compare an individual car to the average of all cars tested. That makes one car's fuel economy instantly understandable in the market, and would increase competition to be above average. Being relative, positions would change each year, but they've revised the absolute rating before. It also wouldn't work when all cars are terrible, but the industry has changed since the 1970's ;)
I still think, even though it is fairly vague, that that is too much. I say we don't tell people jack about MPGs, they can just figure it out on their own, that way we can do away with these stupid lawsuits. It is pretty common sense really, look at the size, shape and engine configuration of a car and you can pretty much figure out which ones will be good on gas and which ones won't. By assigning ratings or numbers, you open the door for crybabies to whine that they aren't getting what was advertised. I suggest these people find employment and/or hobbies other than being an overall PITA, but that is another story altogether. :)
 

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Kind of off topic, but for some reason, I see a lot of Prius owners driving the crap out of them
They're generally not clever people. Well-intentioned, maybe. Like anythng, it needs learning to drive it economically. It's an engineering stepping stone at least. I remember clearly wanting one badly before it came out. Top Gear did several good "expose"s on performance, mileage, environmental impact, interior quality, and cost.

I'd love a Polo Bluemotion. Not every day, since 75hp is a bit weedy, but it has more torque than prius (Diesel > Electric for torque?).

look at the size, shape and engine configuration of a car and you can pretty much figure out which ones will be good on gas and which ones won't.
Cars used to be incredibly inefficient. A lot is in technological advances. Talking about economical advantages in direct-injecting a 16-valve inline-4 makes people go away. At least "Turbo" means "better". I figure if 0 is made average, a car rated +5 would help them understand it's "better" than a -3 car. It would work like safety stars, before nearly every car got 5*. People will still complain, "seems more like a +3", but at least they can't walk into court with an exact number.
 

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Yeah but then they will just come up with anecdotal evidence like "My car got a better rating than my buddy's car, but he gets better mileage".

Sometimes I just want to give up on mankind, lol.
 

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Agreed. I hope that the case is laughed out of court. Too many crybabies don't seem to have a grasp on the word "estimate". Besides, that is the EPA estimate, sue them.

We can all thank that liberal douche judge out in Cali that ruled in favor of the lady who was crying about her MPGs in her Prius or whatever it was she owned.

I say car makers take that off the window stickers, make no claims about mileage and then people will have one less thing to bitch about. Plus it will save our justice system some time with not having to deal with all the frivolous lawsuits.

It would be nice if the vast majority of owners who were in fact getting the advertised mileage could send in affidavits in support of the car makers. Once a judge sees that 97% of owners are right where they should be and only a few squeaky wheels are complaining, it should be enough evidence to toss their case.

EDIT - How the hell are they getting less than 16mpg in the city with a Sportage? I don't get that in my SX even with a heavy right foot. Maybe they sit at red lights, put it in N and floor the engine while waiting for the light to change.
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KIA / HYUNDAI NEW IN THE 1ST QUARTER OF 2O12 ABOUT THE PROBLEM

I BOUGHT MINE IN THE 3RD QUARTER, BEFORE THE EPA BUSTED THEM AND CHANGED THIER LABELS.

I WOULD HAVE NOT TRADED IN MY 2010 SOUL+. THAT I BOUGHT NEW AND RATED AT 30MPG, THOU GOT 33MPG ALL DAY.

I BOUGHT A 2012 SPORTAGE LX, 2.4 6SPD, AT, FWD. IT WAS RATED AT 32MPG.

I DIDN'T MOVE, DRIVE THE SAME ROADS, THE SAME SPEED, ALL HIGHWAY AND AVERAGE 25MPG.

KIA, FLAT OUT LIED ABOUT THIER MPG. LOOK IT UP. THEY WANT TO BUY YOU OFF WITH A 50 DOLLAR A YEAR GAS CARD.

COMMON SENSE TELLS YOU, 2 TO 3 YEARS FROM NOW. MILEAGE WILL BE HIGHER ON ALL VEHICLES.

YOUR TRADE IN VALUE WILL BE AFFECTED, IT ALREADY IS.

DO SOME RESEARCH, THE MODELS THEY LIED ABOUT MOST PEOPLE ARE GETTING 20% LEES OVERALL.

THERE IS NOTHING WRONG, TO SUE A COMPANY. THAT YOU GAVE $25,000 OF YOUR, HARD EARNED MONEY TO. EXPECTING A CERTAIN MPG THEY PROMISED.

DON'T EVEN TELL ME HOW THEY TEST CARS AT48MPH AND ALL THE OTHER BULL. I'M A MECHANICAL ENGINEER

THIS COMPANY LIED TO IT'S CUSTOMERS, FOCUS ON THAT POINT AND GET WHAT YOU PAID FOR. IF NOT JUST ROLL OVER.

USMC DIDN'T TEACH ME TO RUN FROM A FIGHT, THEY TAUGHT ME TO RUN TO THE FIGHT. SEMPER FI


Both Hyundai and Kia are owned by the same company, and while they share factory space, each boasts different makes and models of vehicle. The mistake was discovered by the EPA during a study which compared the agency’s test results and the research data turned in by the company, and will require an update of mileage stickers on the affected models as well as various payouts to the consumers who have already been affected by the misinformation.

Spokespeople for Hyundai say the numbers–which show a 1-6 mile per gallon discrepancy–were a complete mistake on their part and were not intended to pull the wool over the eyes of their customers.
It was filed in the U.S. Central District Court in Los Angeles, and is seeking Compensation For Lost Resale Value On The Customers Hyundai And Kia Models. The Suit Claims That The Compensation Program Offered By The Two Korean Companies Does Not Cover The Lost Value Of The Vehicles.

"Plaintiffs and the Class have been damaged by Hyundai's and Kia's misrepresentations, concealment, and non-disclosure of the incorrect fuel economy numbers, because they were misled into purchasing Hyundais and Kias of a quality different than they were promised, and paying higher fuel costs they would not otherwise have paid," the suit says.

The $775 million value was conceived through a formula which accounts for the vehicles worth, and the miles driven over the likely economic life of the car.

Despite the false mpg claims, some experts believe that Hyundai and Kia vehicles' resale value will be affected.
Lastly, wait till you try to trade it in or sell it in a few years, you'll wish you didn't take their Debit Card. You're giving up your rights and real compensation for, WHAT YOU PAID FOR!!!!!!!
 
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