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2001 Kia Sportage 2WD 4Cyl
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Discussion Starter #1
Went to go change out the four spark plugs, removed everything perfectly, removed one of the ignition coils, pulled out and BOOM.
oil everywhere.
and I mean, EVERYWHERE.

My dad next to me decided to loosen one of the plugs and pull it out to check it out. At this point I assume oil has leaked into the spark plug compartment.

I know people have said *if there is any trace of oily substance, something's wrong*, well, I have about a LOT of oil.

What do we do now?

We only loosened and took out 1 plug, instead of continuing.
Should we continue to drop in a new plug and continue?
 

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Went to go change out the four spark plugs, removed everything perfectly, removed one of the ignition coils, pulled out and BOOM.
oil everywhere.
and I mean, EVERYWHERE.

My dad next to me decided to loosen one of the plugs and pull it out to check it out. At this point I assume oil has leaked into the spark plug compartment.

I know people have said *if there is any trace of oily substance, something's wrong*, well, I have about a LOT of oil.

What do we do now?

We only loosened and took out 1 plug, instead of continuing.
Should we continue to drop in a new plug and continue?
re: oil EVERYWHERE - the inner valve cover gasket is leaking oil -> it is collecting at the spark plug wells - you need to clean all the oil out..

and remove the valve cover, and install a replacement gasket. Make sure you get -all- traces of oil out of the valve cover gasket channel, recommend using a -thin- bead of RTV sealant in the cleaned valve cover gasket channel before fitting the new gasket..

I wouldn't worry if some oil drips into the cylinder head, but would inspect the spark plug electrode pulled to make sure the electrode was not oil-fouled, vs. having oil at the top of the plug (insulator)..

You are also going to want to perform resistance testing on the plug wires, coil pack resistors, and coil packs to make sure they were not affected by the oil in that area..

--
In short, remove all oil from the spark plug wells, clean them up, install a new valve cover gasket, and check to make sure the wires & coil packs are testing good before reassembly,

Regards,
GottaCruise
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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Oil gasket has failed and let oil into spark plug area. It's likely that the other plugs will give the same result. You need to replace the gasket and clean up the oil. Maybe clean up oil around the other plugs before removing them.

If a lot of oil has got into the cylinders, you'll need to blow that out before starting the engine. I would suggest cranking the engine without the plugs and with a rag over the top to collect any oil spray.

I calculate that 25 ml of oil would be enough to cause a serious problem on the compression stroke.

Then start the engine with the old plugs (to get rid of remaining oil), then fit the new plugs.
 

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2001 Kia Sportage 2WD 4Cyl
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Reading this now makes me worried.

As I was doing the replacement, once I pulled the ignition coil (with rubber boot which extends into the plug), and noticed the oil splurging out down back into the well, I immediately put it back and called my dad.

Dad was also confused, but decided to crank the engine twice over until most of the oil was sprayed out/gone..
Lots of white smoke out the exhaust, he notes it would be the oil burning out, which would mean the well would be fine enough to put a plug back in temporarily.

At this point, I knew something was fishy, but decided to go along with him since if I ventured into something else and ended up FUBARing, it'd be entirely my fault- so I just follow his orders.

Put plug back in after two cranks, reconnect everything, get everything back buttoned up, and started it and sure enough everything turned over and runs fine... so far.
Still got some white smoke, let it sit and idle outside, getting some exhaust moisture (definitely not oil, but seems to be almost like water?)

So far, we left all old plugs back in.

Due to the necessity of me needing a vehicle to practice and back and to school, we decided this would hopefully carry me over.

Worth noting the two with just the coil (and not the big pack with the two bolts holding the things down) are not completely submerged, the ones with the large box bolted down, ARE submerged (plug is)

Pictures:
Oil is actually found from within the well hole, the only reason why it's all over the platform (I think valve cover? no idea what it'd be called, but where the ignition coil runs over), is because we left the coil sitting out so it dripped out from the boot into the cover.
 

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I don't think you FUBAR'd anything, in fact the opposite - doing the needed maintenance allowed you to find an issue that you can fix now, before having a problem on the road..

The condensation is most likely from the oil passing through the Cats / exhaust, it should subside -> disappear after running the Sporty at normal temp. / after running on the highway.

The plug wells are shallow, the amount of oil that dripped into the cylinder should not adversely affect the motor.. Just remember to soak up the oil after removing the wires next time -> before removing the plugs. Plan to have lots of paper towels on-hand for the job.

And a can or two of carb cleaner, to clean out the valve cover gasket channel, make sure to get it really clean before laying the thin bead of RTV / installing the replacement gasket.

I would still check the wires and coil packs for resistance values, just to be safe, but if the Sporty is running ok, it probably can wait until you have everything to do the gasket replacment / spark plug change.

FYI, running NGK platinum plugs here, gapped at .038, which seems to be a good gap point for the 2.0 motor,

Regards,
GottaCruise
 

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2001 Kia Sportage 2WD 4Cyl
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Discussion Starter #6
Worth noting that we did not really..-fix- anything.
No gasket has been replaced, haha.
Just patching what had happened.

Thinking my dad will have to just take it into one of the local shops he's friends with, have them change the plugs and probably get a quote to fix the faulty gasket.

What are the symptoms of a leaky gasket?
Could this be the cause of the exhaust leak I've been experiencing? Poor MPG?

Caused by my overheating incident last summer?
 

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Worth noting that we did not really..-fix- anything.
No gasket has been replaced, haha.
Just patching what had happened.

Thinking my dad will have to just take it into one of the local shops he's friends with, have them change the plugs and probably get a quote to fix the faulty gasket.

What are the symptoms of a leaky gasket?
Could this be the cause of the exhaust leak I've been experiencing? Poor MPG?

Caused by my overheating incident last summer?
True, but now you know of an issue that if left unchecked, would toast your coil packs, and you have the opportunity to fix it.

Syptoms of leaky gasket: oil EVERYWHERE. :)

re: cause of the exhaust leak, not likely - it's a separate, common issue on the Sportys, e.g. leaking valve cover gasket. Do a forum search, lots of posts on this topic.

re: caused by the overheating incident last summer: unlikely, the factory gaskets are known to shrink w/ age and fail.. This is not specific to Sportys, per se, but happens over time, not uncommon on older high-mileage vehicles.

After fixing the valve cover gasket & installing new plugs, you should really address that exhaust manifold leak/issue - THAT is where you are getting poor mileage from: *** Illegal air entering the exhaust is causing the primary O2 Sensor to think the motor is running lean, and in-turn commanding extra fuel to be injected by the ECM. ***

Get that exhaust manifold leak checked / fixed !
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh great, I love multiple issues! :rolleyes:

In this case, IF I were to leave the valve cover gasket untouched for awhile and use it, what risks am I looking at?

Perhaps I was exaggerating a tad bit, on oil EVERYWHERE, but it was definitely down those spark plug wells and surroundings- maybe not above the ignition coil area, but definitely down there.
 

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Short term probably nothing, but I don't know what condition the wires are in, etc. - make sure you clean out the plug boots completely before putting them back on..

Clean out -all- the wells of current oil, if you can.

If oil affects the wires / the plugs / causes resistance in firing the spark plug, you will eventually burn out a coil. How soon, I dunno.

Now that you know about the issue, highly recommend taking an afternoon and replacing the gasket.. If you dissasembled to the point of getting to the plugs, there isn't much else left to do in order to remove the valve cover..

Signing off for now - have a good evening,
GottaCruise
 

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What are the symptoms of a leaky gasket?
Could this be the cause of the exhaust leak I've been experiencing? Poor MPG?
The symptoms are what you've already experienced: "Oil Everywhere". Oil at the top of the engine is for the lubrication of the cams and valve train; The oil is pumped up there and runs back into the oil pan under gravity. The gasket just keeps it where it's supposed to be (i.e. not on the spark plugs). There's no real oil pressure involved, but the gaskets do age and may have been affected by the overheating you report.

Replacing the gasket is a relatively easy task, but there are usually bits of the engine which have to be removed to allow the fitting. With older engines, replacing the "Rocker Cover" used to be a 5 minute job.
 

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As mentioned earlier, if you have gotten down to the point where you can replace the plugs, the valve cover is already completely exposed and replacing the gasket is easy. By the way, these leaks are extremely common and nothing to be worried about.

Clean off the top of the engine (you don't want dirt falling down inside), remove the PCV valve, and remove the bolts around the valve cover and around the well in the middle. You may have to use a pry bar or large flat blade screwdriver to *gently* pry one of the corners up, making sure not to scratch the mating surface on the head. Remove the old gasket, clean out the groove that it fits into. Clean off the head mating surface so you can check for scratches and make sure no debris will affect the new gasket. Also, put a dab of RTV silicone in the crease on the sides of each cam hump (all three of them, don't forget the one at the back where the cam sensor is).

A thin bead of RTV in the groove on the valve cover will help hold the new gasket in while installing. Set the valve cover down in place, making sure all the bolt holes are lined up. It won't just plop down where it was, the new gasket hasn't been squished yet. Loosely install each bolt and then tighten them in steps. There is no specific pattern for tightening, but out of habit I start in the middle and work my way outward. Do not overtighten the bolts! I have seen so many engines like this with broken bolts in the valve cover. Snug them down gently over the course of three or four passes. Use 1/4" drive tools, that'll lessen the chance of breaking something.

This is also a good time to replace the PCV valve if you haven't lately.
 

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That's a nice writeup inxquve - I also used 1/4 inch drive to avoid over-torque on reinstall, same X pattern from middle -> outer, let sit for RTV to cure, then rechecked on final pass.
 

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2001 Kia Sportage 2WD 4Cyl
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Getting ready to replace the gasket in a few hours, anything I should keep the look out for?

I barely got it down to the spark plug level, so I will be pondering how to pull the valve cover off.

At the spark plug level, I just remove all the bolts around the valve cover and should be good to go?

Do I need to take another part off the intake pipe?
Do we need to drain the oil first?
Should we replace the plugs at the same time?

How long will the silicone RTV take to cure?

Will most likely be using this gasket:
http://www.pepboys.com/product/details/9677416/975/parts/gaskets/valve_cover_gaskets_related_parts/
 

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Hi Rawfuls,

Don't ponder - see this post by upyourkia:

http://www.kia-forums.com/1g-1994-2002-sportage/83793-kia-sportage-manual-download.html

Download the file, unzip with Winrar or compatible .rar extraction utility, see file: Group10-1.pdf, page 10-20 for the procedure..

Yes, just remove the bolts, but clean off any crud w/ a fine wire brush if needed, any rust hit 'em up with some PB Blaster and let sit prior.. (add a can of PB Blaster to your list.. (Gasket, big can of Carb Cleaner, paper towels, RTV-black sealant..) - and return those Bosch spark plugs, put in NGK plugs.. :)

re: oil - no, you don't need to drain, but if you encounter left-over material on the cylinder head that needs to be scraped, and any gets inside, then you should do a short-interval oil/filter service.. But you should be laying a rag (old t-shirt, etc.) inside along camshaft when scraping any old gasket or sealant anyway..

Yes, you should replace the plugs as part of the service, -after- making sure any old oil is cleaned up. Gap them to .038 - add a spark plug gap tool to your list if you don't have one.

After cleaning the valve cover channel / laying a -thin- bead of RTV in the channel (cut the tip of the RTV applicator for a small opening first! Then cut back as needed..), install the new gasket into the valve cover, press it in firmly,

On the motor, you will place a dab of RTV at each corner of the Camshaft caps (about the thickness of a pea, lay the bead in the center),

Install the valve cover, and adjust so you can thread -all- bolts back in, all should be turning in freely / not cross-threaded,

The tighten to finger-tight, then to firm hand-tight, let the RTV cure for 15-20 minutes, then torque to spec.

Let the valve cover / RTV setup, I let it set for an hour of so before starting.

re: gasket - that's the one I used.

(Working late shift tonight, heading off to sleep..)

Have fun!
GottaCruise
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sweet!
Thanks upyourkia :)

Bosch plugs were free on black friday after rebate, a little too late for returning :p

Will definitely give the gap tool a try..

Will let you all know the disaster or success :)
 

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Sweet!
Thanks upyourkia :)

Bosch plugs were free on black friday after rebate, a little too late for returning :p

Will definitely give the gap tool a try..

Will let you all know the disaster or success :)
Good luck -

Also add a -plastic- gasket scraper to your list, be sure to use a non-marring tool when scraping any gasket material from the head..

All kidding aside, the taper on those Bosch plugs is not 'optimal' for the Sporty motor - be sure when you install them to use some a thin coating of thread anti-seize on the spark plug threads, and also be sure to fully torque all plugs to spec. in (2) or (3) passes..

Especially important if using the Bosch plugs, they tend to loosen up over time - at least that was my experience on the '00 Sporty here..

Regards,
GottaCruise
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Heyoo!

Success, I do believe.
Taking everything off to get access to the spark plug is so easy now (after the first time), I'm starting to feel like a pro :)

Gasket was not cracked, but was definitely hard and probably had no seal.
Pepboys sold the last one just two hours earlier (they showed me in the system, hmph.), so ran to Autozone and grabbed one, all okay.

So I'm not 100% sure what the RTV really was, but my dad used some weatherproof silicone (clear) and that seemed to be the hardest part (clearing the hole again) since it was a few weeks old.
Once we got that open, he insisted on using a load of sealant throughout the channels (hopefully this doesnt mess with anything) there was definitely some sealant seepage, dealed with that as well as I could.

Started it up, clouds of white smoke (good thing I decided to work on it outside this time) for a solid few minutes, then started to die down; and now just a few clouds here and there.

Haven't given it a whirl around the block, but will be going to the gym in a few minutes and will hopefully not have to arrive back home in a tow truck!

Next up is going to be that illegal air issue!

My dad noted that as with my brothers, after my first/second year in college we're just going to get me a new car and to not invest THAT much time into it. So depending on the issue with the illegal air, may/may not just survive with it.
Obviously, buuut, I AM the first child within the long extended family to drive a full year and have a clean record (knock on wood); so I'd like to keep it as long as possible, and might as well learn on an older car than on a brand new one!
 

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Hope you can still see your engine under the layer of Silicone. Try using Google to find lots of interesting stuff about all sorts of things, including RTV. By the way, is your Dad a Windex man as well? (Movie reference).
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So far it's running pretty well.

Still takes about 30 minutes for the heater to REALLY kick in- is there something I can do to speed that up?
I'm driving to practice every morning at 4:50AM, so a heater would be pretty nice.

Gassed up today with a full 12-13 gallons, so we'll see how my MPG fairs.
 

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So far it's running pretty well.

Still takes about 30 minutes for the heater to REALLY kick in- is there something I can do to speed that up?

Gassed up today with a full 12-13 gallons, so we'll see how my MPG fares.
Pleased that it's running well.

I see that you live in California. I guess it's rather cold at te moment, and there's not much you can do to provoke more heat from the engine. Check that the coolant is topped up and there's no flow restriction to the heater.
 
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