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2016 Kia Sedona EX
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a DIY link to show how to change spark plugs for a 2015 and up Kia Sedona? Would love a tutorial and what tools I will need. Has anyone done changed them? Dealer says they need to be changed at only 63K miles.

And I read a lot of spark plugs and landed on NGK IX Iridium 93175.
 

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2015 Sedona SX, 2019 Mercedes GLC300
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56 Posts
Had mine changed at 100K which is what Kia says (actually 105K). The intake manifold plenum needs to be removed, so I let the dealership do it and got a loaner. Took them 3 hours. Didn't look too tough, but I didn't have the time to do it. I had the oil pressure sending unit changed at the same time, since this is a known problem with the 3.3l engine around 80K and I plan to keep the van for another 50K at least. If it starts leaking, you have to take the intake manifold back off to get to it.
 

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2016 Kia Sedona EX
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Had mine changed at 100K which is what Kia says (actually 105K). The intake manifold plenum needs to be removed, so I let the dealership do it and got a loaner. Took them 3 hours. Didn't look too tough, but I didn't have the time to do it. I had the oil pressure sending unit changed at the same time, since this is a known problem with the 3.3l engine around 80K and I plan to keep the van for another 50K at least. If it starts leaking, you have to take the intake manifold back off to get to it.
The dealer said I needed new plugs at 63K. I hope that was true. It will cost only $257 for labor and parts to do the tune up given they have the manifold off to replace a stuck open cylinder 1 fuel injector. Never heard of the oil presser sending unit causing problems. How much did it cost you to replace it?
 

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'16 Sedona SX, '09 Genesis
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217 Posts
What reason(s) did the dealer give for why the spark plugs "need" to be changed. It is certainly not on Kia's maintenance schedule at 63k.

That said, if they have to remove the intake manifold to get at the bad fuel injector, then for sure you should change out the plugs what you are at it.
 

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2016 Kia Sedona EX
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What reason(s) did the dealer give for why the spark plugs "need" to be changed. It is certainly not on Kia's maintenance schedule at 63k.

That said, if they have to remove the intake manifold to get at the bad fuel injector, then for sure you should change out the plugs what you are at it.
Good question. I didn't ask. Not sure if there was residue from having an open fuel injector and/or working through a deadish battery the last couple of months that required a couple jump starts or what. Given I saved roughly 50% to do the plugs now (even if early) I felt it was worth it. The next time I need plugs i hopeful something appears on youtube for these later models so I can do it myself.
 

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2015 Sedona SX, 2019 Mercedes GLC300
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56 Posts
Good question. I didn't ask. Not sure if there was residue from having an open fuel injector and/or working through a deadish battery the last couple of months that required a couple jump starts or what. Given I saved roughly 50% to do the plugs now (even if early) I felt it was worth it. The next time I need plugs i hopeful something appears on youtube for these later models so I can do it myself.
The oil pressure sending unit was $15.00 plus an additional half hour to change it out. It was a PM thing. If it starts leaking, you have to pull the intake plenum and manifold to get to it (talk about horrible placement). The Service Manager/Technician told me he's seen enough of them start leaking at 80K that's it's worth the extra $75.00 to change it out now while everything is apart. I've known the guy for 20 years so I believe him. Just an FYI if interested.
 

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Kia Sedona, VW Golf R, Porsche 991 C2S 7 MT
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7 Posts
I'm replacing the spark plugs and oil pressure sending unit today. The dealer wanted $500~ to do this work. I've acquired the parts for a total of $40~. Currently, our Sedona has about 113,000 km and is still on the original spark plugs. I normally change plugs on my performance vehicles every 4 years or 40,000 km, so to have gone this long seems insane to me.

There is a great DIY video here. It's for a Cadenza, but the basic process is going to be the same. From the Sedona shop manual, it looks like I should expect to remove the battery and battery tray in addition to more or less what is shown in the video- which is easy to do, I recently had to remove it to change the transmission fluid.

 

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Kia Sedona, VW Golf R, Porsche 991 C2S 7 MT
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Completed the spark plug replacement this afternoon. Most complicated spark plug swap I've ever performed. Hyundai/Kia should really be ashamed of such a silly design. Frankly, 3x the work that it is even on my 911. That said, it's not "difficult" - it's time-consuming and a bit tedious. The hardest part is struggling to remove some of the vacuum lines that inevitably seize in place over the years. Lots of twisting and pulling to get those liberated. Otherwise, it's all very straight forward.

A few tips for those that take this on. In the YouTube video of the 2014 Cadenza, he doesn't remove the battery. I personally recommend just getting it out of the way, as it gives you way more room to work. That said, I think its entirely possible to leave the battery installed if you so choose. He also doesn't remove the throttle body from the surge tank. The Sedona shop manual and my own experience in performing this today would seem to dictate that it's necessary. It's easy to do, anyway - just 4 bolts holding it in place.

I didn't end up doing the oil pressure switch as I got to the point of needing to remove the intake manifold and I really couldn't be bothered to keep going. The spark plugs were quite dirty and certainly showed signed of needing to be replaced. I'll go 60,000 to 80,000 km on this next set, and then at that point, will replace the plugs once again, and tackle the oil pressure switch.
 

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16 Sedona SXL
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Completed the spark plug replacement this afternoon. Most complicated spark plug swap I've ever performed. Hyundai/Kia should really be ashamed of such a silly design. Frankly, 3x the work that it is even on my 911. That said, it's not "difficult" - it's time-consuming and a bit tedious. The hardest part is struggling to remove some of the vacuum lines that inevitably seize in place over the years. Lots of twisting and pulling to get those liberated. Otherwise, it's all very straight forward.
Is this common for other brands? Seems ridiculously complicated for a routine maintenance item. I replaced the plugs on my 328i and you literally pop off the engine cover, pull out the spark plug coils with your hands, stick the wrench with a spark plug socket in and start removing it.

I just kind of wonder what kind of thought process is behind how automakers design these things. I haven't needed to do the plugs yet, but I had been impressed with the way KIA designed other maintenance items. The oil filter is on top of the engine so you can do easy oil changes. Air and cabin filters literally can be changed in a tool less fashion (in my 328i you have contort your self into the footwell and remove several screws to get at the cabin filter). Kind of sucks that plugs are so hard to change.
 

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'16 Sedona SX, '09 Genesis
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217 Posts
Comparing the Sedona to an inline6 engine in a RWD platform, or the flat6 in a 911, is not fair. On just about any FWD with a transverse-mounted V6, the intake manifold will invariably cover up one bank of the cylinders. This is the case even with some longitudinally mounted V6, like the 3.8L in my Genesis sedan. I changed the spark plugs on it, and naturally, the 3 that are on the exposed cylinder bank were easy as pie. OTOH, pulling the intake manifold was 95% of the work to get to the remaining 3. Not exactly difficult. Just tedious to remove all the attached hoses and connectors. I doubt there are too many FWD V6's where this is not the case.
 

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'15 Kia Sedona SX
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147 Posts
Agree: I could get 5 of 6 sparks out of my old MPV. Had to ask my mechanic to get the 6th... It's a known thing. My indie charges fair prices, though.

Agree #2: I love that the oil filter is up top! No more spoosh when I'm underneath, changing the oil. And that the wiper fluid holds a full gallong -- BRILLIANT! I have complained about that issue for years ("Why can't they just...."). Air filter? Easy squeezy. And replacing the cabin filter was much less of an ordeal than it was with VW and Volvo.
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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880 Posts
What reason(s) did the dealer give for why the spark plugs "need" to be changed. It is certainly not on Kia's maintenance schedule at 63k.
A bad injector will kill a spark plug, as will a bad coil. So, it sounds like the dealership is being proactive....
 

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2015 Sedona SX-L
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26 Posts
There are transverse V6's that don't require intake removal to access the rear bank. Aside from the pushrod engines (where spark plugs are typically tucked in between the exhaust manifold ports) the Nissan VG30DE is a DOHC example. Nissan left an access hole between the intake runners and designed a different coil (than the front) that would sneak in that little hole. Not very cost effective to design a different coil for the rear bank, they did it only to simplify maintenance. So it can be done, but for most manufacturers it's more important to save a few bucks.

I don't have a problem with removing an intake manifold to change plugs as long as it's fairly straightforward. On a Chrysler 3.5/4.0L V6 and Ford Duratec 3.0L I can pull the intake and change all plugs in 20 minutes. I hope when the time comes for me to replace plugs the Kia 3.3L isn't as bad as most make it out to be.
 

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'16 Sedona SX, '09 Genesis
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217 Posts
Removing the intake manifold isn't that big a deal, just tedious work, as you need to unplug a lot of connectors and pull out vacuum hoses. On the Genesis, it was a 20~25 min job. I've looked at the Sedona and I don't see how it can be a whole lot worse. Okay, maybe the first time I do it, it might take a bit longer to look for and identify all the connections.

Frankly, it would take me longer to wash the engine prior to starting the work. I prefer to have the engine - and the underhood area - clean and free of dust&grime before I open up the intake manifold. This minimizes any contaminants getting into the intake tracks
 
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