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2022 Kia Sorento PHEV SX
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What’s everyone getting for MPG so far? We’re doing some highway driving and have been able to plug-in charge about every 75 miles. Pulling right around 500 miles per tank on our first three runs. 48-50 combined mpg. Less on the highway.

I imagine it’s close to the advertised 70 per if you’re charging it every 30 miles, but who has time for that?
 

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2022 Sorento SX-P PHEV
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If you were to actually recharge every 30 miles the ideal effective fuel efficiency would be infinite, given the 32 miles all-electric range.

I agree with @sophrosynic, the value in the PHEV is in leveraging all-electric in local (<30 mile) driving. For me, that covers my (mostly non existent due to COVID) daily commute and maybe 50% of my other driving (kids' activities, taking the dog to the woods, grocery and hardware stores, etc). Recharging after each of these trips is practical, and with the exception of cabin heat they are entirely electric.

When I do drive long distances I usually burn the battery down to around 60%, then set it on HEV mode (charge sustaining). In HEV mode on hilly highways I see low to mid 30 mpg. When I get 10 or so miles from my destination (assuming there's a charger available), I kick it back to EV mode and burn the battery down most of the rest of the way. In this way I see 40+mpg on our long distance trips into the mountains. With the roof box blowing around in the wind - of course.

Combine the 60% local (almost all EV) with the 40% long distance (mostly HEV) and my average is in the upper 50's mpg. I'm seeing 560+ miles per tank.

The 70ish mpg effective target is entirely dependent on whatever the EPA things an average driving mix is - just like the "combined" fuel economy value. When COVID restrictions ease and I'm commuting more regularly, I fully expect my average to rise, as proportionally more of my driving becomes local vs. long distance.
 

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22 Sorento SX-P PHEV Silky Silver
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I filled up last night for the first time in 20 days. I had averaged 59.2MPG on 9.5 gallons and still had 83 miles of gas range in the tank. I've plugged in almost every night, except when I had plenty of charge for the next day work commute. Total I calculated close to $14 in electricity used. I'm now using a kill-a-watt to track exactly so I'll have better numbers in the future. So 12.84 miles per dollar.
 

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'21 Sorento Hybrid EX
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I filled up last night for the first time in 20 days. I had averaged 59.2MPG on 9.5 gallons and still had 83 miles of gas range in the tank. I've plugged in almost every night, except when I had plenty of charge for the next day work commute. Total I calculated close to $14 in electricity used. I'm now using a kill-a-watt to track exactly so I'll have better numbers in the future. So 12.84 miles per dollar.
I actually figured it would be quite a bit higher than that. If I'm in the 40mpg range it puts us at about the same $/mile

Although now that the cold weather has arrived I've watched my mpg plummet to "only" 35mpg so far. It's still pretty early in this tank so I'll know more in a couple weeks
 

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22 Sorento SX-P PHEV Silky Silver
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I actually figured it would be quite a bit higher than that. If I'm in the 40mpg range it puts us at about the same $/mile

Although now that the cold weather has arrived I've watched my mpg plummet to "only" 35mpg so far. It's still pretty early in this tank so I'll know more in a couple weeks
I had to go on three 80 mile trips and one 108 mile trip on that tank so that definitely hurts. For my normal routine I can almost stay on electric, other than heating needs.
 

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I had to go on three 80 mile trips and one 108 mile trip on that tank so that definitely hurts. For my normal routine I can almost stay on electric, other than heating needs.
yep, that would do it. For such a tiny gas engine it's really not all that efficient. Marginally better than the BMW twin scroll 2.0, which has so much more zip to it.
 

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22 Sorento SX-P PHEV Silky Silver
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yep, that would do it. For such a tiny gas engine it's really not all that efficient. Marginally better than the BMW twin scroll 2.0, which has so much more zip to it.
I had the 2.0 twin scroll in my bmw x3 and this sorento feels just a zippy, other than the driving dynamics, as it's a bit bigger. I guess the electric motor torque might be making it feel that way.
 

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Not playing fan boy, just devil's advocate - I bet weight plays a big factor. The BMW N20 2.0 twin scroll powered the F25 generation X3 xDrive28i. That vehicle weighs a full 2,000 lbs less than the PHEV Sorento. I didn't look into the power:weight, but not quite an apples to apples comparison.

Also worth mentioning that the PHEV has a more powerful AC motor than the HEV. Same torque off the line, but additional power when coming up to speed. I've read at least one industry publication review that stated this makes a noticeable different in driving feel.

That said, I agree that the efficiency on the gas engine isn't eye popping. I can only imagine it could be worse!
 

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13kWh is about the most I've been able to squeeze into it in one charging session - that was from "fully" discharged (13% remaining) to fully charged. Cost $1.70, which is about price equivalent to half a gallon of gas. Given the 30ish miles that buys, it works out to a cost equivalence of around 60 mpg.

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I've only put about 100 miles on since I got my PHEV and, despite using Eco and selecting EV, and despite almost all my driving being exclusively in the city, I've gotten about 35mpg. It is shocking how much gas is used to run the heat in winter. When I don't use the heat, I use no gas (says 999 mpg for the trip). My last couple drives I've just used the seat heater and steering wheel heater for warmth, but that doesn't help when I have kids in the back.
 

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I've only put about 100 miles on since I got my PHEV and, despite using Eco and selecting EV, and despite almost all my driving being exclusively in the city, I've gotten about 35mpg. It is shocking how much gas is used to run the heat in winter. When I don't use the heat, I use no gas (says 999 mpg for the trip). My last couple drives I've just used the seat heater and steering wheel heater for warmth, but that doesn't help when I have kids in the back.
Same, in the HEV my dash was consistently reading well over 40, usually around 45mpg. As soon as the cold crept in it plummeted below 40 almost overnight. Weather warmed up a bit this week and I'm back up to 42 now. Gas engine still wants to kick in more frequently while stopped, I assume to charge/warm the hybrid components.
 

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I've only put about 100 miles on since I got my PHEV and, despite using Eco and selecting EV, and despite almost all my driving being exclusively in the city, I've gotten about 35mpg. It is shocking how much gas is used to run the heat in winter. When I don't use the heat, I use no gas (says 999 mpg for the trip). My last couple drives I've just used the seat heater and steering wheel heater for warmth, but that doesn't help when I have kids in the back.
If the kids are out of car seats you have heated 2nd row seats in the SX-P PHEV that could help. You can toggle them on through UVO a few minutes before loading the gang into the car. Otherwise , I agree that the gas mileage w/ the engine running for cabin heat isn't impressive - especially on short "city" drives. I tend to leave my battery less than 100% charged both for longevity as well as to give the engine something to do (i.e. charging) while it's working to heat up the cabin.

Another note is that battery efficiency will plummet as it continues to get colder, so the balance of EV to HEV would naturally shift toward HEV as winter sets in even without needing the engine to produce cabin heat. In these shoulder seasons though...
 

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If the kids are out of car seats you have heated 2nd row seats in the SX-P PHEV that could help. You can toggle them on through UVO a few minutes before loading the gang into the car. Otherwise , I agree that the gas mileage w/ the engine running for cabin heat isn't impressive - especially on short "city" drives. I tend to leave my battery less than 100% charged both for longevity as well as to give the engine something to do (i.e. charging) while it's working to heat up the cabin.

Another note is that battery efficiency will plummet as it continues to get colder, so the balance of EV to HEV would naturally shift toward HEV as winter sets in even without needing the engine to produce cabin heat. In these shoulder seasons though...
Kids are in a car seat and a booster, so no help there (despite my son constantly wanting to turn on his heater).
 

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2022 Kia Sorento PHEV, Gray
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If the kids are out of car seats you have heated 2nd row seats in the SX-P PHEV that could help. You can toggle them on through UVO a few minutes before loading the gang into the car. Otherwise , I agree that the gas mileage w/ the engine running for cabin heat isn't impressive - especially on short "city" drives. I tend to leave my battery less than 100% charged both for longevity as well as to give the engine something to do (i.e. charging) while it's working to heat up the cabin.

Another note is that battery efficiency will plummet as it continues to get colder, so the balance of EV to HEV would naturally shift toward HEV as winter sets in even without needing the engine to produce cabin heat. In these shoulder seasons though...
The Kia manual says to keep the battery at full charge as often as possible for longevity and use a Level 2 charger if possible. Also, Kia intentionally designed the drivetrain to use both batteries for all-electric, and also primes and integrates the gas engine for optimal driving efficiency. Unlike my Prius where the gas engine won't even ever start until the car is completely out of electric power, then kicks in violently. The 2022 PHEV was designed to not operate this way.
 

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My last couple drives I've just used the seat heater and steering wheel heater for warmth, but that doesn't help when I have kids in the back.
I'm 7 miles from work so this has been my driving strategy the last few days coming home from night shifts in the morning.
 

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New to the forum. Test drove an SX version last week, but the dealership was not very clear about EV only mode. Is there a "switch"/setting to allow me to use the car as an EV? For example, I want to drive to the gym, it's 5 miles one way, half of which is a 50 mph roadway. I could use EV mode the whole way and the gas engine never kicks in, right? I realize it does come on for heating as discussed in this thread (I am in northern IL).

The reason I am asking is the salesman said that it runs on battery to start but kicks into gas when I reach 30 mph or so. I was confused and asked another person and they said the same thing. It's pretty scary that they cannot differentiate because that sounds like how a HEV works. There was so much going on with all the tech inside the car that I did not really do a deep dive. The test drive was ona whim as I happened to be by the dealership and they had 4 on the lot.
 

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New to the forum. Test drove an SX version last week, but the dealership was not very clear about EV only mode. Is there a "switch"/setting to allow me to use the car as an EV? For example, I want to drive to the gym, it's 5 miles one way, half of which is a 50 mph roadway. I could use EV mode the whole way and the gas engine never kicks in, right? I realize it does come on for heating as discussed in this thread (I am in northern IL).

The reason I am asking is the salesman said that it runs on battery to start but kicks into gas when I reach 30 mph or so. I was confused and asked another person and they said the same thing. It's pretty scary that they cannot differentiate because that sounds like how a HEV works. There was so much going on with all the tech inside the car that I did not really do a deep dive. The test drive was ona whim as I happened to be by the dealership and they had 4 on the lot.
The cumulative knowledge about HEV/PHEV/EV among dealership sales staff across all brands marketed in the US couldn't fill a tea cup. Off topic - my mother recently test drove a RAV4 Prime, during which the sales associate said literally not one true fact about the vehicle. Le sigh.

For the record - there is a button on the PHEV which allows you to change between "EV" (charge depleting), "HEV" (charge sustaining), and "Auto" (???) modes. The Sorrento PHEV will happily accelerate to and cruise at 70mph on electric only. The gas engine will kick in, even in EV mode, when you ask for more than the 90hp AC motor can deliver (for ex: accelerating up a steep entrance ramp). I cannot speak for the HEV model - I do know that the AC motor is less powerful in the HEV when compared to the PHEV.

As you note - cabin heat changes the equation.
 

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I find the use of the gas engine on short trips to be a real annoyance. We are the ideal customer base for a PHEV based on our driving habits and my family was so excited to have a PHEV SUV option to upgrade from our 2013 Chevy Volt, so I traded it in expecting the EV technology to be improved. It definitely is not. I struggle to understand why a vehicle made almost 10 years ago is able to produce at least a little bit of heat for the cabin without running the engine, but the brand new model can't. When spending $50k on a vehicle that competes in many ways with some of the luxury brands, I shouldn't feel like I can't use the heater.

I loved the powertrain in the Volt. As long as there was some charge left, the engine didn't kick on unless either you tell it to through drive mode or it was below 14 deg F outside. Unfortunately, there have been few days above 60F here since we bought the vehicle, so even though we rarely drive more than 20mi in a day and have plenty of time to go home and recharge on our Level 2 charger between trips, our lifetime MPG is disappointingly low. Too bad.

Is anyone else feeling this disappointment?
 

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I find the use of the gas engine on short trips to be a real annoyance. We are the ideal customer base for a PHEV based on our driving habits and my family was so excited to have a PHEV SUV option to upgrade from our 2013 Chevy Volt, so I traded it in expecting the EV technology to be improved. It definitely is not. I struggle to understand why a vehicle made almost 10 years ago is able to produce at least a little bit of heat for the cabin without running the engine, but the brand new model can't. When spending $50k on a vehicle that competes in many ways with some of the luxury brands, I shouldn't feel like I can't use the heater.

I loved the powertrain in the Volt. As long as there was some charge left, the engine didn't kick on unless either you tell it to through drive mode or it was below 14 deg F outside. Unfortunately, there have been few days above 60F here since we bought the vehicle, so even though we rarely drive more than 20mi in a day and have plenty of time to go home and recharge on our Level 2 charger between trips, our lifetime MPG is disappointingly low. Too bad.

Is anyone else feeling this disappointment?
Absolutely. Short (< 10 mile) cold weather jaunts are much of my driving. I keep the climate control off and use seat / steering wheel heater exclusively and wish I didn't have to. To be fair, on very short drives (to get milk, etc) I have to remember that my old car wouldn't've had enough time to warm up any way, and that lessens the sting somewhat.

That said, I'm still seeing 70mpg+ on medium length (~30 mile) drives in cold weather while using the climate control. As long as there's enough time in the drive for the engine to warm up and turn back off, the efficiency is still impressive.

It's not that the technology doesn't exist, nor that HMG doesn't have it (the Niro EV has a heat pump option), but that it wasn't provisioned on this particular vehicle. This was an engineering decision that we can question, but I can understand the motivation. Electric heat options are either resistive (which is brutally inefficient - it just kills the battery for only a little bit of heat, and that when the battery is at it's lease efficient, too. I'm really glad we don't have to deal with that) or heat pump based. Heat pumps can be bad for NVH (ask any RAV4 Prime owner about the hated heat pump "growl") and need to be supplemented since they are ineffective at very low temperatures. I have to keep remembering that this is a "budget" luxury car and some corners were cut.
 
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