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2002 kia rio 1994 ford ranger 1977 chevy scottsdale
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Discussion Starter #1
well I decided after reading all the posts about platinum plugs will only work only in these kia cars I decided to try the walmart autolite spark plugs part number 3923 for my 02 kia rio so I took out the platinum plugs which had very high mileage and tryin these copper core plugs and to my surprise car runs fine so I am wondering why everyone says for these cars to run you have to run platinum plugs, so whats up with all that?? thanks!
 

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2015 Sorento EX V6 AWD Ebony Black
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well I decided after reading all the posts about platinum plugs will only work only in these kia cars I decided to try the walmart autolite spark plugs part number 3923 for my 02 kia rio so I took out the platinum plugs which had very high mileage and tryin these copper core plugs and to my surprise car runs fine so I am wondering why everyone says for these cars to run you have to run platinum plugs, so whats up with all that?? thanks!
Ya got the wrong plugs?

You need Champion copper plus plugs! Not really, :D it's your choice, but I like Champions. I always got more power in anything with them.

Copper is the best conductor, behind silver, or gold, and they have a self-cleaning projected nose, plus, it seems also because of this, they raise the compression a bit, delivering more power. Seeing, is believing ;)

Wry'Cuda is right tho they wear out faster, being copper is so soft.
 

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2002 kia rio 1994 ford ranger 1977 chevy scottsdale
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Discussion Starter #4
okay well I knew that the platinum has a life span of about 60k miles vs the copper about 30k miles and I figured that the copper would have more voltage at the gap than other plugs and I personaly liked the ac delco plugs but wanted to try these autolite's for $6 for 4 plugs from walmart due to the price point :) so I like hearing what you guys like and do with plugs and stuff any other thoughts please reply!
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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Conductivity of the central electrode is not the issue. The difference between metals is immaterial when you have a voltage of several tens of thousands of volts. Anyhow, the HT cables usually have resistance for suppression purposes. Iridium seems to be the metal of choice; it's very hard and resistant to erosion. Interesting fact: World production of Iridium is about 5 tonnes/annum and about 1 tonne of that is used for spark plugs. (That's about 1 cubic foot, BTW).
 

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2002 Kia Rio, 2011 Kia Sorento 2005 f 250 1996 geo metro 1992 f 150
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I thought the coating on the plug was the issue for life so the electrode would not wear out hence the longer life (gap won't change) i did not know the center conductor was made of the same material be it platimum or irridum that would be real expensive i would think. Anyhow i use ap autolite plugs on mine no issues versus the stock NGK ones. Your coil pack is nothing more than a transformer you can't get any more voltage out of it unless you get a different coil that has more turn's on the output of the coil. Just my 2 cent's it's all about plug life. Good luck
 

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2002 kia rio 1994 ford ranger 1977 chevy scottsdale
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Discussion Starter #8
thanks guys some interesting stuff! :)
 

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2015 Sorento EX V6 AWD Ebony Black
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Autolite, & Motorcraft plugs, are made by Ford, AC plugs are made by GM, and Champion plugs are an independent company. Originally, Arthur Champion split from his brother to become AC. I think he went cheap,and sold out to GM in the process. IMO, Champion are better made plugs.

The bottom line is the better you can ignite the fuel/air mixture, at the plug, the better the power, & efficiency.

Not too many years ago the 80's, stock o.e. spark plug wires were fiberglas strands with carbon dust over them, no metal at all! For radio suppression reasons. If you replaced them with copper, or stainless steel supression wires, your car came "Alive"!

That's why racers use Blue Max stainless wires along with hotter coils, better copper contact distributor caps, Magnetos, and, or, MSD ignitions (Multi Spark Discharge).
 

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2004 Rio
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This is strange. I put platinum plugs in my 1.6 and it ran worse than the old plugs. What I read at the time was the Kia motors do not like platinum plugs. I took them out after only 1 week. They are here if anybody wants them. I then went to the dealer and they put in their OEM plugs. Runs like a charm now (forget the brand and number). This was a couple years ago. Today I am visiting the forum to solve a different problem. I am getting a misfire on start up cold for the first couple minutes. I see an arc from the plug wire to the coil frame. I will clean up that area and use some silicone spray. Maybe I will pull that plug and see what it looks like (high resistance), but I am a bit reluctant now because these plugs are way down inside a deep channel.
 

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2008 SpectraSX, 2014 Optima LX,2006 Jeep Liberty, Linux Mint Mate
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Denny...
I don't know but I would think the plugs you used were either "Special" design (like the BOSCH multi electrode) or were gapped incorrectly...
Many plugs come "pre-gapped" for 90% of the cars they were made for..The other 10% will end up with the wrong gap and problems...
From NGKs website...

"Gapping
Since the gap size has a direct affect on the spark plug's tip temperature
and on the voltage necessary to ionize (light) the air/fuel mixture, careful attention is required. While it is a popular misconception that plugs are pre-gapped from the factory, the fact remains that the gap must be adjusted for the vehicle that the spark plug is intended for."
Spark Plug Installation Instructions

Always check the gap of EVERY plug you install... I like and use NGKs in my 2.0L Spectra ...BUT... I always check the preset gaps before installing them... Even NGK has been way off on a few of their plugs and they required adjustment...
Your RIO (as well as our Spectras) needs their plugs gapped to .044"

Both my wife's and my Spectra came with "Champion" brand plugs from the factory... I believe there was a commercial campaign agreement between KIA and Champion...
My wifes Spectra at 60k miles was misfiring just after replacing the timing belt..
I pulled the plugs and found the center electrode ceramic insulator on one of the plugs had cracked up inside and then fell down over the center electrode..effectively insulating the spark from the air/fuel mix... I replaced the plugs on both cars with NGK
platinums...

KIA's engines have gone through a few revisions and they were designed to use NGK or Denso brand single electrode plugs.. Plugs like the BOSCH cause mis-fires, and poor performance...Proven HERE by posters...

Platinum plugs work fine in KIAs as well as Iridium and Copper, The difference is the amount of miles you can go before the electrodes wear down and you need to replace them...
Copper around 30k miles
Platinum around 60~100k miles (I'd replace them at 60k)
Iridium around 100~120k miles

I would really like to know the brand and part# of the set of plugs you are giving away..Not so much as because I want them as to understand "why" they ran so poorly..

If you have arching ANYWHERE in high voltage wiring you have problems...
That's why they have rubber boots and HV wires... A cold car often has condensation on it's parts and HV and moisture are a bad mix.. I'd suggest replacing the rubber boot and/or the coil itself... As the car warms up the moisture "boils off" and the misfire goes away till the next morning... Silicon spray is a "temp-fix" ...Solve the problem..
As far as getting to the plugs...a well designed spark plug socket (SEARS) and a long 3/8" extension will solve that problem...
Dave
 

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2016 FIAT 500X Trekking Plus AWD; 2016 Kia Forte5 SX 1.6T A/T
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I would slightly change what Dave said...

Yes, Iridium are rated for 100k miles or more, but that does not mean they will take so much.
The iridium electrode is very robust. It will survive even more than 150k miles, but the problem lies in insulator. It is still same type of ceramic that is in most spark plugs.

The insulator cracks over time allowing spark to drift and/or weaken. As a result, spark plug that should last 100k miles may fail after "only" 60k miles.

Therefore, if the replacement is not a very big deal (like some V6 that you must remove air intake manifold) go with some cheaper (copper or platinum) and change them more often.
 
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