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2013 Kia Sorento EX V6
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What do you recall High Performance? I wouldn't call K&N drop filters high performance but I have one in my 2013 and with the added MPG's and lifetime use it pays for itself so it was a no brainer decision...Hope that helps.
 

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2013 Sorento LX V6, '03 GSX-R600, '00 Nissan Maxima SE
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What do you recall High Performance? I wouldn't call K&N drop filters high performance but I have one in my 2013 and with the added MPG's and lifetime use it pays for itself so it was a no brainer decision...Hope that helps.
Same here. I put one in my maxima for the simple fact that I don't have to keep buying one. Eventually, I'll put one in the Sorento when it is time to change. AND I've never had a problem with it, some say it is bad for your vehicle but the maxima is at 210k and still kicking so I look forward to adding one to the Sorento.
 

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2013 Kia Sorento EX V6
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I had this filter in all my vehicles and never once had engine issues and all well over 200,000km's in all my vehicles...everyone has their opinion and is entitled to it but I'm just sharing mine, take it for what it's worth.

I knew someone that swore up and down when front wheel drives came to market that rear wheel drives were better in snow...go figure that one!!
 

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2012 Kia Sorento SX
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys
How much is the K&N filter normally I see one on ebay for $49.00
 

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Corolla 1996, Corolla 2009, Soon Sorento
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I bought the K&N filter at my local autoparts store for $70. After two fill ups I have not noticed any change in fuel economy nor improved performance. I still have a crappy 11-15 mpg in the city driving (lots of stop signs, traffic lights and some traffic jams) on my 2.4 GDI engine and never more than 27 mpg on the highway.
 

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2013 Sorento EX V6 AWD
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I'll provide a counterpoint. The K&N filter lets substantially more dirt into your engine than the stock paper filter. That is an undisputed fact. The stock filter costs $12 on rockauto.com and I change my filters once a year. So it takes a pretty long time to even break even when you consider the cost of the K&N plus the cost of the oiling kit. Why would I want to pay MORE and allow more dirt into the most expensive component of my vehicle?

Best,
 

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2013 Kia Sorento EX V6
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Pulled directly from K&N's website:

ENGINE PROTECTION LIMITED WARRANTY
Unlike many companies, our warranty for O/E replacement air filters and intake systems does extend beyond the replacement of a defective K&N part. For the original purchaser of the product, our warranty covers any engine damage or related costs incurred as a direct result of the use of a properly installed and maintained K&N O/E automotive replacement air filter or intake system on the specific vehicle for which the product was designed to be used by K&N. This includes reasonable vehicle repair costs directly related to an engine problem caused by the failure of a K&N product. Furthermore, we warrant that using our product will not result in a vehicle warranty denial. K&N will not be responsible for any indirect, consequential, special, contingent, or other damages not listed above.

We will promptly reimburse the consumer for the cost of the repair if a service provider denies warranty coverage as a result of a K&N product or claims that a K&N product has caused harm to your engine or vehicle. In order to receive reimbursement, we require each of the following:

The consumer must provide a written statement or repair order from the dealership or service provider in which the dealership or service provider blames the problem or warranty denial on a K&N product;
The service provider or consumer must provide K&N with all allegedly damaged parts. Many states have laws that require a service provider to retain all parts replaced during a vehicle repair, unless given consent to dispose of the parts by the consumer. K&N will pay the shipping cost to recover these parts; and
The consumer must provide proof of purchase of the K&N product along with cooperation in helping us investigate the claim.
Once these steps have been completed, K&N will contact the service provider and collect evidence to support their claim. In the event we are not provided with sufficient evidence, we reserve the right to reject the claim and will use our best efforts to assist in establishing your rights toward the service provider under warranty or other provisions.

We strive to exceed consumer expectations. Customer service can be reached at 1-800-858-3333.
If it's good enough for our KIA Mechanic on Sorento Nation it's good enough for me....
 

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Race Blue MY12 Skoda Octavia RS TDI Manual
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New filter every year??...
I was going through one every 3 months!... Last time I changed it, it was black. Quite literally!

That being said, turbo diesels pull a TON more air through than even your 3.5L V6. ;)
 

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2013 Sorento EX V6 AWD
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Pulled directly from K&N's website:



If it's good enough for our KIA Mechanic on Sorento Nation it's good enough for me....
Just try filing a claim. :)

For me, I drive a wee bit under 1000 miles per month. So I'm good for one air filter per year. Seems silly to take a chance.

ISO 5011 Duramax Air Filter Test Report

The table to watch is "dirt passed versus time." It shows how much dirt the filters allowed to pass through (to your engine) until they reached the maximum allowable restriction. The K&N passed 20 times more dirt through (7.9g) versus the 0.4g passed by a paper AC Delco filter. It also reached maximum allowed restriction in half the amount of time as the AC Delco paper filter. So it clogs up faster and lets more crap into the engine...all while costing significantly more. Take out a postal scale and pile 7.9g of baking soda or other powder onto it. You'll be surprised at how much that is. I don't see the value proposition and I'm all about hot rodding and pushing the envelope. I had my 2.7T Audi A6 putting out a bit north of 400hp, nearly double the stock output, and STILL used a paper filter. :)

Best,
 

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I just checked out the air flow data for the K&N 2.2R CRDi Sorento air filter.
http://www.knfilters.com/dynocharts/33-2969.pdf
Says that it starts creating restriction at 536.4CFM. (Cubic feet/minute)

Here's an interesting bit of info - my 125TDI Skoda Octavia (2ltr turbo diesel) at 22.5PSI, 4,500rpm, will pull around 1,200cfm.
The Sorento's 2.2ltr engine is slightly larger, so would probably pull more.

Hmm. lol
 

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2013 Sorento, Suzuki V-Strom
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added MPG's
How?

Way back when engines were carbureted without any electronic controls, if the air filter got so clogged that the engine ran rich, yes, a clean air filter could save some fuel. Modern engines with mass air flow sensors and all the rest won't notice a dirty air filter except to react as if the throttle isn't quite all the way open. Keep in mind the throttle's job--it is there to restrict the air flow to the engine at all times except when you press the gas pedal to the floor. That is part of how our Otto-Cycle engines work.

More air flow through any so-called high performance air filter? Maybe and only at wide open throttle and high rpms. At other times either the throttle is doing its job of throttling the air flow, or the engine isn't turning fast enough to pump the max through the filter. And, as the Spicer tests clearly show, the two so-called high performance air filters they tested, the Amsoil of the day and the K&N both fell way off with even a moderate dirt load.

I tried a K&N air filter on my turbo Volvo. Properly placed into the airbox, and factory oiled out of the box, it allowed dust into the downstream side of the airbox. I never had that with an OEM type filter.

If you want to frequently go through the sloppy mess of cleaning and reoiling the K&N or other oiled cotton gauze or oiled foam air filter, OK. For me...no thanks.
 

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Pumping Losses.

Anytime you have a throttled engine using anything other than variable-lift cam lobe (EG "Throttle blade-less" -- not to be confused with variable valve timing like our KIAs have) systems like BMW's valvetronic, you run into pumping losses. Given one filter flowing xxx cfm compared to another flowing xxx + 20% cfm under the same temperature and vacuum, the higher flowing one will have less pumping losses for the engine. Another way to look at it is that your engine will not have to "work as hard" to deliver the same amount of torque. Or another way of looking at it, is that steady-state at xx mph, in 6th gear, at xx degrees temperature, on a 0% grade, you need (for example) 40 ft/lbs of torque to overcome all frictional losses. To get the 40 ft/lbs of torque, using stoich (14.7 lambda ratio) you need to ingest (for example) 200 cfm of air. Now to get the 200 cfm is where your pumping losses come in to play. You have no negligable pumping losses when the throttle butterfly is wide open, however, the ECU will firstly request a downshift (or two) from the transmission as well as get out of stoich and enter some sort of power-enrichment mode and probably net you somewhere closer to 12:1 ratio. This is why driving at WOT isn't going to save you gas. (If, however, it were a manual transmission vehicle, and the ECU didn't go into power enrichment mode, and you timed it so that at WOT your engine produced exactly 40 ft/lbs, then this would give you the highest fuel ecomony) Nevertheless back to real world here. If you have a poorer flowing filter, that accomplishes the same thing as closing the throttle blade more, introducing more pumping losses, and requiring a lower vacuum (closer to atmospheric pressure) in the engine (lower vacuum = higher load), and thus consuming more fuel.

And I will reiterate "poorer flowing" one more time. Simply replacing a dirty OEM filter with a clean OEM filter will improve economy because we're talking about changes in CFM.

Having said all of that...The powertrain engineers are under a lot of pressure to find minute increases in fuel economy everywhere, especially if it is a cheap change. A powertrain engineer could have easily increased the size of the air filter if they needed additional CFMs to net them additional fuel economy, and the corresponding change would be very small.

I used to be a big K&N fan. From a savings perspective (only on filter media) it's still a compelling argument. From a power or especially fuel economy standpoint, it's a very big stretch. When you consider that performance filters get their awesome flow by allowing smaller particles into the engine, then they sound even worse. Yes, the Moss-Magneson act gives you something to stand on, but if you have tons of microscratches in your main bearings and it points to dirty oil caused by excessive intake of larger than stock particles, well, it's hard to defend yourself.

My last comment is that if you do not know what you are doing when you oil the filter, you may underoil it, and allow even more dirt in your engine, or overoil it which can drip on (and will without-a-doubt destroy) your mass air flow sensor.
 

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K & N air filters

I'll provide a counterpoint. The K&N filter lets substantially more dirt into your engine than the stock paper filter. That is an undisputed fact. The stock filter costs $12 on rockauto.com and I change my filters once a year. So it takes a pretty long time to even break even when you consider the cost of the K&N plus the cost of the oiling kit. Why would I want to pay MORE and allow more dirt into the most expensive component of my vehicle?

Best,
I have never seen the figures, but was wondering where you got your data. The K&N passes more air then stock. What is important is how many microns of dirt will the filter let past. The lower the micron filtration is the more crap it will catch. The lower microns of filtration will accumulate more crap.
However:
What is the micron rating and efficiency of a K&N air filter?

Air filters are not measured by micron size. As an industry standard, air filters are tested in accordance with the ISO 5011 test protocol to measure capacity (the physical amount of dust a filter can hold before cleaning is necessary) and efficiency (the filter's ability to trap and hold dust). See technical service bulletin 89-5R from the Filter Manufacturer's Council. The dust selected for the test contains a specified distribution of different particle sizes according to ISO standards.
The content of the two most commonly used types of ISO test dust for air filters is as follows:

Our testing has demonstrated that on average, K&N replacement air filters and air intake systems have a cumulative or Full Life filtration efficiency of between 96 and 99%. Different filters test at different efficiencies due to changes in their shape, surface area and relationship to the direction of air flow through the factory air box or test housing. Like most air filters available in the USA, our filters will provide all the engine protection you need.
For more information on our testing, see our K&N Product Testing page.
 

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Like most air filters available in the USA, our filters will provide all the engine protection you need.
For more information on our testing, see our K&N Product Testing page.
That's simply not true. And the source of my data, performed according to ISO 5011 specs, was included in my posting above. Click on the link.

Of the NINE tested filters, K&N's had:

The lowest efficiency.
The second lowest accumulative dirt capacity.
The second highest amount of dirt passed THROUGH the filter.
The third fastest in reaching air restriction limits (while passing the 2nd most amount of dirt).

It only excelled in one test. It had the lowest initial restriction when it was clean. But it quickly lost that edge as it loaded up on dirt. A filter that passes more dirt into my engine doesn't strike me as any kind of improvement or bargain. Even the high flow rate versus paper filters is negated as it loads up on dirt. Perhaps if someone has the time, money, energy to clean their K&N filter on a monthly basis, that wouldn't be the case, but then they'd still be allowing more contaminants into the most expensive component of their vehicle. No thanks.

Best,
 

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The K&N passes more air then (sic) stock.
Does a clean K&N air filter actually pass more air than a clean OEM type air filter? Maybe. Of course, this only happens at wide open throttle and high rpm. At any other time the throttle is restricting air flow (that's its job) so the air filter restriction is meaningless. And, at what point does dirt accumulation in the K&N make it pass less air than an equally dirty OEM type air filter? This can easily happen before the recommended cleaning interval.
 
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