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Sedona '02
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Time to check things out again. Pulled into a parking lot and when coming to a complete stop the engine stalled. Started it back up again (starts and runs fine in drive, but stalls at stops), it sounds like a rather loud vacuum leak. May be time to start looking for new vehicle though, I'll know for sure after looking it over tomorrow after work. Kinda looks a bit like a leaking head gasket (front, near radiator). So that will mean new head gaskets and timing belt. May not be worth it any longer at this point. Especially since it could also use new brake pads and rotors among other little things.

I have CEL back on and the only code it's throwing is P0431 indicating an issue with catalytic converter. It did throw a code for cylinder 6 misfire after changing spark plugs and new vc gaskets, but not throwing the code any longer. It does vibrate quite a bit, so I'm assuming the misfire is still there.
It's most likely the Idle Air Control (IAC) valve solenoid. It is attached to the throttle body right under the round air intake hole. It's black in color and has a plastic housing. It's attached by two screws. Do not lose them.

Goto rockauto and look for 2003 to 2005 Sorento. It has the same engine. Look under "Fuel/Air' and then IAC. It's not cheap. When Sedona reached high mileage, this thing fails. Lookup how it works but basically it lets air into engine when stopped at light (throttle body butterfly is closed when foot off gas and foot on brake) so that engine does not stall. And the valve closes when gas is applied. You will stall at stop sign or light if this fails. Sedona throttle body is a pretty solid piece of machinery and is very reliable. No need to replace that.

Weirdly, Sedona Kia does not sell this individually for Sedona but does for Sorento. For Sedona, you have to buy the whole throttle body with it - mega money.

I did fix mine with this by buying the Sorento part and replacing it. The old part, even if you clean it won't work and will fail again. Do not buy one from ebay for Mitsubishi engine (cheap) - they say it works but do not believe it, I did and it didn't work, the part was like $25. money wasted.

You will pull your hair out trying to find out what's wrong. I did. My sister got stuck in places due to this thing failing. It was really annoying.
 

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2003 Kia Sedona EX
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #22
Found it, I'll have to get it on order asap.

I also just got a new code popped up today.. P0113
ALLDATA shows to check the IATS, google search says that is the MAF. I'm not seeing any IAT sensors anywhere, just a whole MAF. Guess it's supposed to be replaced as a unit.
 

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Sedona '02
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Found it, I'll have to get it on order asap.

I also just got a new code popped up today.. P0113
ALLDATA shows to check the IATS, google search says that is the MAF. I'm not seeing any IAT sensors anywhere, just a whole MAF. Guess it's supposed to be replaced as a unit.
I would first fix the IAC first to see if that fixes your stalling issue. The MAF issue maybe related to how your engine is constantly stalling and affecting it. One at a time, MAF sensor is not cheap.
 

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2003 Kia Sedona EX
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80 Posts
Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
OK

So I'm using an Autel AL329 for DTCs

I plugged it under dash while engine running to see live specs and see these that fluctuate a slight bit while idling

LOAD_PCT 16.9 - 17.3%
ECT (*F) 190.40 - 192.20
RPM 691 - 718
SPARKADV 10 - 12*
IAT (*F) 107.6
MAF (lb/s) 0.01

Do these all point to the IAC? I was told by quite a few people (Autozone, O'Reilly's, NAPA) to just clean out the PCV, IAC and TPS really good and put them back in and that should fix up the issue. Or at least start there before just blindly buying new (expensive) parts.
Also, my gas pedal sticks sometimes where I have to almost kick it to get the throttle to operate. I assume to just lube the throttle where the cables connect, probably some white lithium grease.
And could this explain why it was throwing a code for cylinder 6 misfire (not doing so any longer), probably due to it being flooded?
Exhaust smells quite a bit like gas and is quite smoky (white smoke), so it's running very rich.
 

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2003 Kia Sedona EX
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Discussion Starter #25
So I pulled the IAC, tested resistance on the posts (according to specs I seen on another thread on this site), then cleaned it very thoroughly and checked resistance again. Before cleaning the resistance was higher than spec by about 5 ohms. After cleaning brought the resistance back down to within spec.
Also cleaned PCV valve on bank 1 (front near radiator) with brake parts cleaner. Not sure if there's a second one in bank 2 (by firewall) that goes to the brake booster.

Engine is NOT stalling, but idles erratically a bit (687 - 793 rpm)

I am seeing IAT 111.20 *F (after idling for 20 minutes to operating temp), and it shows ECT 203 *F (radiator fan does kick on at this point). Also LOAD_PCT fluctuates from 16.9 - 21.2%

I have a new thermostat ready to go in, have to get a new gasket (forgot to put it on order with the thermostat) and obviously fresh coolant.. maybe need a new coolant temp sensor as well?
There's no coolant leaks that I can see and it doesn't seem to be losing any coolant. Heat comes out nice and hot from front and rear heaters. Those rear heater pipes will need to be replaced with the hoses soon though and the rust is starting to form up on them (love living in the rust belt)

Oh, and gas pedal is no longer sticking since I cleaned the throttle body. There was lots of deposit gunking up the butterfly valve.

May really be time to check the timing belt too and replace it, along with the alternator belt and power steer belt. Been hearing a ticking sound as it warms up. And I can hear an air hissing sound too, so have to really check for vacuum leak. Though, all the vacuum hoses are fine.
 

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So I pulled the IAC, tested resistance on the posts (according to specs I seen on another thread on this site), then cleaned it very thoroughly and checked resistance again. Before cleaning the resistance was higher than spec by about 5 ohms. After cleaning brought the resistance back down to within spec.
Also cleaned PCV valve on bank 1 (front near radiator) with brake parts cleaner. Not sure if there's a second one in bank 2 (by firewall) that goes to the brake booster.

Engine is NOT stalling, but idles erratically a bit (687 - 793 rpm)

I am seeing IAT 111.20 *F (after idling for 20 minutes to operating temp), and it shows ECT 203 *F (radiator fan does kick on at this point). Also LOAD_PCT fluctuates from 16.9 - 21.2%

I have a new thermostat ready to go in, have to get a new gasket (forgot to put it on order with the thermostat) and obviously fresh coolant.. maybe need a new coolant temp sensor as well?
There's no coolant leaks that I can see and it doesn't seem to be losing any coolant. Heat comes out nice and hot from front and rear heaters. Those rear heater pipes will need to be replaced with the hoses soon though and the rust is starting to form up on them (love living in the rust belt)

Oh, and gas pedal is no longer sticking since I cleaned the throttle body. There was lots of deposit gunking up the butterfly valve.

May really be time to check the timing belt too and replace it, along with the alternator belt and power steer belt. Been hearing a ticking sound as it warms up. And I can hear an air hissing sound too, so have to really check for vacuum leak. Though, all the vacuum hoses are fine.

I think it's the IAC valve. They will go bad when high mileage. Cleaning won't make difference. I did the cleaning. It still stalled my car.

Do put in the new thermostat. It's not hard. But will need a new gasket. Make sure the hose clamp is tight so it won't leak there. The thermostat body comes at sideway.

Do change the rear heater pipes with hoses. Hoses will save you money. And hose clamps.

You have to change timing belt if high mileage. Rock auto is your friend. (get new water pump and other pulleys too)

Sedona makes that almost air hissing sound but it's not leaking. it's just the sound from the manifold. Mine does it too.

Also, disconnect the wire connection to the manifold inside valve actuating connection. I forgot the name. The one that opens and closes the butterfly inside the manifold when from low to high RPM. I read many places that screws holding the butterflies get loose and fall into the cylinder. I removed the connection that sticks toward the firewall. Look into this. It's on the left side at back of manifold if standing in front. (there are two connection to the manifold)
 

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2003 Kia Sedona EX
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Discussion Starter #27
I'll get a new IAC and change it out then. Going to get the thermostat gasket and new coolant so I can get the thermostat done. Rear heater started blowing ice cold air again, even with coolant temp at 200*F and the front blows super hot air. Wondering if I need a new rear heater core. Previous owner had put stop leak in the radiator and never flushed it out. Hopefully I won't have to replace the radiator too, but won't be surprised if I do.

Any tips on doing those pipes to hose for the rear heater lines?
I assume this hose will do?

And timing belt is definitely going to be next to get done, before it just snaps. I'll get a kit with water pump and components (includes the pulleys). I'll also do the belts to alternator and power steer pump at the same time, I'm sure they need to be replaced too.

I'll also check into that butterfly thing in the manifold. Then just need to figure out if I need O2 sensor or cat on bank 2. Scan tool shows me that it keeps kicking in P0431 for catalyst temperature not in spec and it kicks in at 1,800rpm at 55mph. Carfax shows that cat was replaced about 7 or 8 years ago, maybe wrong one was put in or it clogged.
 

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I'll get a new IAC and change it out then. Going to get the thermostat gasket and new coolant so I can get the thermostat done. Rear heater started blowing ice cold air again, even with coolant temp at 200*F and the front blows super hot air. Wondering if I need a new rear heater core. Previous owner had put stop leak in the radiator and never flushed it out. Hopefully I won't have to replace the radiator too, but won't be surprised if I do.

Any tips on doing those pipes to hose for the rear heater lines?
I assume this hose will do?

And timing belt is definitely going to be next to get done, before it just snaps. I'll get a kit with water pump and components (includes the pulleys). I'll also do the belts to alternator and power steer pump at the same time, I'm sure they need to be replaced too.

I'll also check into that butterfly thing in the manifold. Then just need to figure out if I need O2 sensor or cat on bank 2. Scan tool shows me that it keeps kicking in P0431 for catalyst temperature not in spec and it kicks in at 1,800rpm at 55mph. Carfax shows that cat was replaced about 7 or 8 years ago, maybe wrong one was put in or it clogged.

The symptom for IAC is either engine stuttering or stalling at stop light. With high mileage, that's what I would fix.

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Cold air in rear with full coolant? I think you may have air in the system. My car takes a long time to get air out. When I did my radiator or something related, I have to run the engine a long time (like 45 min) to get all the bubbles out. I will run the engine with all the heaters running, car front at slight incline if possible.

I have one of those coolant filler kit things (not cheap) plastic funnel thing with radiator inlet adapter kit - amazon. I will tell you, I don't know how many times I used that thing - I though it was too much for a dam plastic kit but it did pay for itself - we have 3 cars - we changed radiators for all three of them. I will put that thing on radiator neck with coolant in it and let it run for a good while until I don't see bubbles.

You may have to change the radiator sometime. Mine started leaking at around 160,000 mile. I got one from Autozone, if I remember. it's working good so far. You will have a hell of time taking it out. Everything is easy except there are these 1 or 2 small bolts (can't remember how many) at the bottom of the radiator on each side where they are partially hidden by the bumper and AC dryer (on the left side) and transmission cooler on right side. You need like small 1/4 ratchet and long extension to get to them 8mm (I think) bolts. My god that took like 30 minutes to take those 4 bolts. Make sure you check out where the bolts are before starting the job. You are gonna need some plans before tackling them those bolts. Compared to that, our Maxima and Avalon were piece of cake. Literally took 30 min to take out and replace the radiators for each.

Also, taking the radiator fans out takes some wiggling and rotating the fan in a way. You have to take out the right fan (facing front) first than slide left fan to right side and take it out.

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For the pipe hoses, I will suggest you do not buy them online. You will need at least half a day because first you have to slightly lift the car on the passenger side so you can see the pipe. The pipe is in 2 pieces and they are connected by these hoses. They are easy to take off but to get new hoses you need to make sure the hose is tight or will leak. If the hose slides on, it will leak. It SHOULD not easily slide in. Sedona hoses are in metric size and all the hoses I found were in inches. So, they are either slightly larger or slightly smaller. It's better to get a slightly smaller diameter (bit more to push it on) but it won't leak. You can take the pipe to auto store and get the hose by foot. I had to make a few trips cause I didn't take down the pipe.

Pipes are in a pair (inlet and outlet to rear). So, you need a pair length of hose. Get slightly longer than necessary just in case.

A pair of pipe comes down from the engine at an angle, then it angles to horizontal and there are two short hoses == then two long pipes === then two short hoses ===== then two long pipes, angles up === then two hoses == then pipes. (If I recall)

Usually, the pipes from engine to down angle don't get rusted but you may want to connect the hoses from the origin (may take time). I didn't bother going into the engine side. The reason for the rust along the horizontal pipe area is that I think all the winter salt gets kicked back on to the hangers of the pipes along the horizontal bottom area and they get lodged in those small crevices and rust start forming and eats through the pipe.

What I did.

If I recall ---->>>

engine == down angle pipe == hoses (cut this) === pipe === two hoses == pipe ==== hose (cut this) == angle up pipe ==

I left the original pipes there (didn't want to bother removing them). Also you need to tie up the length of hose on to something. There is the exhaust pipe that runs near it so you need to keep the hoses away from it; rubber will melt if too near.

Get one long hose for each outlet (make sure it's a tight fit to the pipe). Also hose clamps.

engine -== down pipe = new hoses ============================ up to the last pipe. Hose clamps (zip tie the hose (Not super tight)) along the remaining pipe so hose is being held up by the zip ties along the original pipes.

DO NOT confuse the inlet pipe from outlet pipe.

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Definitely do the timing belt. If not it can snap and kill the engine.

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Not sure about the O2 sensor. I know the CAT are expensive. You may have to do your own investigation.

Good luck.
 
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