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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #1
In 2007 Sportage LX 4 Cylinder, I have a fine oil mist spraying out a seal near the top of the engine.

The sprayed oil is landing on the "hot" thing nearby and then dripping onto the exhaust pipe at the bottom. It causes a certain amount of smoke.

I think this is a gasket of some sort, but I don't know what it's called.

Please take a look at the two photos I've attached. I've pointed a red arrow to the place from which the oil sprays

What is this? Is replacing this a job an amateur can do? How much do you think a mechanic would charge?

Please let me know. As usual, I'll appreciate any feedback I receive.

Best regards.

113437



113438
 

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2011 Forte SX 2.4L (thankfully MPI) A/T 144K miles
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The arrow is pointing to the valve cover gasket, which can be replaced by a DIYer. However, the job does require careful attention to detail, and IMO a novice should use an (inch) torque wrench, in order to avoid guessing how much to torque the bolts. (but of course I'm not implying that torque wrenches should be used only by novices)

An independent shop would charge around $150-400, and a stealership would probably be $400-500. If you feel at all uneasy about your ability to get something like this accompliished, then I suggest finding a good, honest independent shop to get the job done right.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #3
The arrow is pointing to the valve cover gasket, which can be replaced by a DIYer. However, the job does require careful attention to detail, and IMO a novice should use an (inch) torque wrench, in order to avoid guessing how much to torque the bolts. (but of course I'm not implying that torque wrenches should be used only by novices)

An independent shop would charge around $150-400, and a stealership would probably be $400-500. If you feel at all uneasy about your ability to get something like this accompliished, then I suggest finding a good, honest independent shop to get the job done right.
Thank you so much for your reply.

I’ll research “valve cover gasket” to try to decide if I’m going to attempt this on my own.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L, 17 Ford Edge Sport 2.7L V6, 15 Mustang 3.7L V6, 08 Harley Nightrain
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Thank you so much for your reply.

I’ll research “valve cover gasket” to try to decide if I’m going to attempt this on my own.
Search “valve cover gasket” and “camshaft cover gasket”.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank you so much for your reply.

I’ll research “valve cover gasket” to try to decide if I’m going to attempt this on my own.
I think I can do this.

I can't find any info on Sportage, but I found a video for a 2007 Elantra that looks like it has the same engine.

Do you have an idea of what the torque should be?
 

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2011 Forte SX 2.4L (thankfully MPI) A/T 144K miles
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I don't have specs for your vehicle, but the final torque will be somewhere around 100 inch lbs. However, that torque value is only one of multiple important things. I don't know what you've seen in the videos, but here are some generally accepted 'good practices' to follow when installing this type of gasket.

There will be a specific bolt tightening sequence pattern for your vehicle, which is the tightening order on installation, and also for removing the bolts (in the reverse order) as well. Multiple passes (in sequence) are used to tighten the bolts - around 1/3 the final torque value for the first pass, 2/3 for the second, and final (spec) torque value for the final pass. Close is ok for the first 2 passes, and many folks do them by hand (however, use the torque wrench if you have any concern about your ability to come close by hand).

There will also likely be spark plug well gaskets included with the valve cover gasket, and those might have special considerations on your vehicle. And another, very important item is to find out if there are any 'transition' points on the head, which will require the use of a SMALL amount of RTV to bridge those gaps. Aside from those points (if any), do not use RTV with a solid gasket. Also be very careful when removing the old gasket material from both surfaces, in order to avoid gouging the metal, and do not pry the valve cover off, if it does not easily separate from the head (carefully work it loose using plastic tools). Clean up all bolts and bolt holes, before installing the new gasket.

I strongly recommend obtaining the valve cover gasket procedure for your specific vehicle, instead of using another set of specs. There may be something very important, specific to this vehicle which may (if not done) cause the job to ultimately fail. I'll also add that you will find other DIYers saying that some (or all) of what I wrote above is unnecessary, and that they have installed gaskets the fast and easy way. My answer to those folks is - your vehicle, your choice.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate your feedback as it has helped me better understand the process. Thank you.

I have not found "the valve cover gasket procedure for your specific vehicle." I'm probably not looking in the right places. I want to obtain this information before I start work.





I don't have specs for your vehicle, but the final torque will be somewhere around 100 inch lbs. However, that torque value is only one of multiple important things. I don't know what you've seen in the videos, but here are some generally accepted 'good practices' to follow when installing this type of gasket.

There will be a specific bolt tightening sequence pattern for your vehicle, which is the tightening order on installation, and also for removing the bolts (in the reverse order) as well. Multiple passes (in sequence) are used to tighten the bolts - around 1/3 the final torque value for the first pass, 2/3 for the second, and final (spec) torque value for the final pass. Close is ok for the first 2 passes, and many folks do them by hand (however, use the torque wrench if you have any concern about your ability to come close by hand).

There will also likely be spark plug well gaskets included with the valve cover gasket, and those might have special considerations on your vehicle. And another, very important item is to find out if there are any 'transition' points on the head, which will require the use of a SMALL amount of RTV to bridge those gaps. Aside from those points (if any), do not use RTV with a solid gasket. Also be very careful when removing the old gasket material from both surfaces, in order to avoid gouging the metal, and do not pry the valve cover off, if it does not easily separate from the head (carefully work it loose using plastic tools). Clean up all bolts and bolt holes, before installing the new gasket.

I strongly recommend obtaining the valve cover gasket procedure for your specific vehicle, instead of using another set of specs. There may be something very important, specific to this vehicle which may (if not done) cause the job to ultimately fail. I'll also add that you will find other DIYers saying that some (or all) of what I wrote above is unnecessary, and that they have installed gaskets the fast and easy way. My answer to those folks is - your vehicle, your choice.
 

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09 kia spectra ex,04 Neon,04 Chry. T&C, 08 Pontiac G6 gt
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Looks to me like your vehicle is equipped with the 2.0 liter motor, a very common and much used motor for your year. The valve cover gasket replacement is the SAME for all car model applications(Sportage, Spectra). For a beginner, go to your local car parts store and buy at least a Haynes repair manual for your car, it will cover the Sportage, Spectra line. I did this for our daughters Spectra, unfortunately it is 65 miles away from me now and in her trunk do I can't look up the spec's or steps for you.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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41 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I can't find any specific information for this engine. I've seen two videos showing Elantra engines that look almost identical to mine. However, neither of them used a torque wrench. So, I'm concerned about that.

Folks, I'm going to do this job today. I'm just concerned about the torque and torque sequence. I want to make sure the bolts are tight enough, but not too tight.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #11
My spark plug wires aren't long enough to remove them from the top of the engine. So, I need to remove the other end of the wires, but they won't come off. How's a good way to do this without tearing them up?

Just in case these aren't spark plug wires, I've attached a photo. I have to remove the wires circled in red to get the wires out of the top.

113549
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #13
Hello.

The cover has two hoses going to it. One seems to be clogged.

I don't know what the part is called.



Any suggestions?
113551
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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Most likely PCV. Looks gunked up. You may not be happy when you pull the cover.
Clean out as much gunk as you can with a putty knife and flat bladed screwdriver. Don't let the gunk fall into any oil drain back holes. Plug them (oil drain back holes) with paper towels. Once you get this stuff loose try to suck it out with a shop vac. Its going to be messy. Get some brake cleaner to spray the rocker cover. Everything else does not need to be hospital clean, but don't leave this built up gunk behind. You need a new PCV valve, and perhaps a new rubber tube. (I'm looking at the left hose nipple and the gunk at the end.)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you for your reply.

The PCV Valve won't come out. It just spins around. It looks as though there's some sort of grommet embedded in the cover... the thing won't come out.

Red arrow points to brass piece that spins with PCV Valve


113552


Most likely PCV. Looks gunked up. You may not be happy when you pull the cover.
Clean out as much gunk as you can with a putty knife and flat bladed screwdriver. Don't let the gunk fall into any oil drain back holes. Plug them (oil drain back holes) with paper towels. Once you get this stuff loose try to suck it out with a shop vac. Its going to be messy. Get some brake cleaner to spray the rocker cover. Everything else does not need to be hospital clean, but don't leave this built up gunk behind. You need a new PCV valve, and perhaps a new rubber tube. (I'm looking at the left hose nipple and the gunk at the end.)
 

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09 kia spectra ex,04 Neon,04 Chry. T&C, 08 Pontiac G6 gt
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The one with the arrow to it is the PCV valve(the one with residual foam covering it) the other is the port for equalizing air and goes to the air cleaner assembly.
PCV is a threaded fit and if is just spins is probably stripped plastic threads of the Valve cover Does not need to be removed to remove the valve cover itself.Once that is off, the PCV can be "flush" cleaned with with spray carb cleaner or spray "Brake Klean", the spring and valve inside the PCV is what you'll want to be concerned about cleaning out of hardened oil vapor residues.
You really should have spent the $18.00 at any auto parts store for the Haynes repair manual for your vehicle. My daughter is permanently residing 65 miles away, so there is no time soon to go get it from her.
 

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2007 Sportage 4 Cyl
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Discussion Starter #17
On the underside of the valve cover are about 20 screws. Are these safe to remove? I'm thinking I can find out what's on the inside of the PCV Valve and somehow get it out that way.

What do you think?

113553
 

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09 kia spectra ex,04 Neon,04 Chry. T&C, 08 Pontiac G6 gt
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Yes they can be removed for access to the "channeling" of the PCV system. Not sure how deep that brass insert goes thru the plastic Valve cover that the PCV valve screws into. Never had that apart on ours, so I can't be of much help as to what you'll find.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'm assuming that if one of these screws fell out (after I put them back) that it would destroy the engine. Right?

Yes they can be removed for access to the "channeling" of the PCV system. Not sure how deep that brass insert goes thru the plastic Valve cover that the PCV valve screws into. Never had that apart on ours, so I can't be of much help as to what you'll find.
 

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That depends entirely on how they come out and re secure when putting back together. Yes if they don't "snug up" well, they MAY "back out" and fall onto valve train components(not a good thing). There are automotive sealing products like Loctite thread lock that can be purchased from any auto parts store. People there can assist in which is needed for your task.
On the "plus side"...you've made good progress in getting the valve cover off, Hang in there!
 
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