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2009 Kia Borrego EX V8
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, my check engine came on today. I wasn't sure what was going on, but I have an OBD II scanner at home, so I thought I would check out what code came up before I bring it in to the dealer. But after I connected the OBD II scanner to the car, the scanner kept having error that the car did not respond. Then I checked the connectors and it seems to me that the pins on the car connector and the OBD II scanner don't match. I search on the internet, and did not really find anything. The one thing I found on the internet is a picture of an OBD II connector on the a Sorento. But this OBD II connector seem to be different from the one in my Borrego. Anyway, I can't scan the OBD code, so I took the car into the dealer, and the service manager there was nice enough to check the gas cap for me and found that it was loose. He told me that the engine check light should go away in a day or two. But I'm still bugged that I my OBD II scanner doesn't work with this car. I wonder if it requires a different connector/cable. I think the car manual does say that it's OBD II.
 

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2009 Kia Borrego EX V8
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I just called Autoxray. You probably can guess the answer: buy the new code reader. I had the OBDII reader for a while. So it's probably not CAN comliant. But then if they change the OBD protocol, they should call it something different, maybe OBD III. That would make it too easy for the do yourselfer like me know the difference. Also according to the Autoxray guy, except for the ground, power pins, the communication pins are not standardized:((
 

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2009 Borrego
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320 Posts
I have a scangauge II on my other vehicle, which can clear OBD II codes... but I haven't tried it on the Borrego yet. Away from home now but will try when I get back.
 

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Borrego
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51 Posts
Additional OBD from Kia Training

I did some more checking I hope this helps.
http://www.kiatechinfo.com/pds/training/OBD_2.pdf

diagnostics.png

OBD II Connectors
Kia vehicles typically have two Diagnostic
Connectors installed:
OBD II Connector - Conforms to standard SAE J1962, which defines requirements for the
connector location, design, terminal assignments and electrical interface
requirements. The connector has sixteen pins and is located in the passenger compartment on the driver's side of the dash under the knee
pad. Power to the Scan Tool is continuously provided by pin 16. The Kia Hi-Scan Pro Scan Tool DLC Cable 16 (P/N 09900-21100) will mate with this connector. For all Kia OBD II compliant vehicles, engine and transmission data are available at this connector. ABS, Traction Control System and SRS data are also available at this connector on some newer models, such as 2001 Optima (for earlier models like 2000 Sephia, this data must be retrieved from the Kia Diagnostic Connector underhood).
Kia 20-pin Diagnostic Connector - Most Kia
vehicles have this Kia-specific connector, which is located in the engine compartment.The Scan Tool requires DLC Cable Adapter (P/N 09900- 29020) to connect. OBD II engine and transmission data are available at this connector.
On some Kia vehicles, this connector provides the only access to ABS,Traction Control System and SRS data. On some vehicles, data from those systems are also available at the OBD II connector, but the underhood connector does have testing circuits and capabilities that the OBD II connector does not have. Relays, keyless
entry and the fuel pump circuit can also be accessed here.


The law also requires that the vehicle
manufacturer design the diagnostic system in
a manner that permits retrieval of OBD II data
in a standard format using any available
generic scan tool using one of four data
transfer protocols:
• SAE J1850 VPW
- (Used by GM, 10.4k Baud data transfer
rate)
• SAE J1830 PWM
- (Used by Ford, 41.7k Baud data
transfer rate)
• ISO 9141-2 CARB
- (Used by most Kia, and other
European
and Asian, 10.4k Baud data transfer
rate)
• ISO 14230-4 KWP 2000
- (Used by 2001 Kia Optima V6,
19.2-115.2K Baud data transfer rate)
 

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2009 Kia Borrego EX V8
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all responses. I found the website scantool.net, which would let you connect the OBD to your laptop which in my case I have a netbook that would be ideal. But in the mean time, you can always go to any car parts store and have the code read and reset for free.
 

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Kia Rondo 2009 4cyl LX
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