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After changing the battery in my 2011 Sorento LX (76,xxx miles) it threw the code P0106. This codes says the Manifold Absolute Pressure (MAP) Sensor is bad. I tried clearing the code but it came back almost immediately. I was an hour from home so I had no choice but to drive home and try to get an appointment with the dealer.
On my way home I had the cruise control locked in at about 68mph, after about 4 or 5 minutes at that speed, the cruise control shut off and my car entered "limp mode" which would not allow me to accelerate at all. I pulled over and shut my car off and started it again a few seconds later and it ran fine, but I did not exceed 60mph in fear of the problem repetition.
I called the dealer and they wanted to charge me a little over $100 just for a diagnosis. I called a part store and the MAPS only costs $75.
I was curious if anyone else had experienced this problem, if they fixed it themselves, and if anyone knew where the sensor was located or troubleshooting techniques to determine if its the actual sensor that is bad or if something else has tripped this code. I have googled, youtubed, and searched the internet, but have had no luck finding this issue on any sorento, specifically my year and trim. Please help!
Thank you!
 

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I have the same model Sorento and the exact thing just happened, I changed the battery and now I am getting that same code P0106. I havent replaced anything yet, more to follow. This is the second time in 2 years I have had to replace this battery, its got a lot of miles for the year model about 140xxx, and the battery was bad when I had it tested (bad seal).
 

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Don't know if this applies, but why not use a small 12 v battery hooked to a cigarette holder plug and plug it in while you change the main battery. This should keep the car computer "alive" during the change out. ??
 

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If I may add to this post...
The things that are in common...
Battery replacement and Sedonas with ground problems...

When removing and replacing car batteries you "disturb" the electrical connections between the battery terminals (lugs) and the wire connection going to the terminals..

You MUST use a wire battery brush on both to remove oxidation. In this case the oxidation looks like a dull gray color and/or rust on the wire connections... this limits the current available to the electronics in the car and also the voltage available... The voltage available will drop because of the resistance of the oxidation... If the voltage drops then the electronics (microprocessors) start adding erroneous fault codes...

By adding a few drops of motor oil (left in the oil bottle) right on the CLEAN terminals will keep the air from oxidizing the lead.. Have this done with each oil change and you will NEVER have a bad battery connection again...

Also Sedonias have problems with grounds... Meaning the wires that are attached to the car's body/frame end up with corrosion also... Follow the wire attached to the negative terminal (-) that goes under the battery holder... At the end of this wire it attaches to either a multiple ground terminal or straight to the car's body... remove this connection and sand that area and apply silicon grease (to keep the air out)

Microprocessors (computers) can get "lost" and reseting them by either pushing a reset button on your desktop computer or by turning the car off then on again restores normalcy to these circuits... Bad (corroded) connections can cause all kind of problems in your car.. that don't seem to be related to just a battery replacement....

Usually the guys hired to wait on you at auto repair shops or auto parts store do not have enough knowledge to properly clean the connections before connecting the new battery..They are taught to sell products (little red and green felt washers that they put under the battery connections) and not how to properly replace a car battery...

The MAF sensor is probably more sensitive to the low voltage than other sensors and it shows up first...
Dave
 

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FYI.

Some battery maintainers/chargers have a supply mode that you can attach to the terminals. This mode provides typical battery voltage. You can use this when changing batteries by attaching the charger to the terminals while the battery is swapped out.

I have a CTEK model with this feature. It also does desulphation.

Something like this might help avoid some issues when swapping batteries.
 

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This exact thing happened with me today. Kia Optima 2010, got the battery replaced and the check engine light came on. The error code is P0106 MAP sensor. If any of you guys are still around, can you give some clue on how you got it solved?
 

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I think this solution is a bit strange. Could you explain how it is that opening and closing the hood 4 times will fix the problem?
 

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I think this solution is a bit strange. Could you explain how it is that opening and closing the hood 4 times will fix the problem?
I see this stuff all the time, on these forums. People post on old thread that's full of information, but don't say if they've done anything that's already been mentioned. Most of the time they never post back again, so you're the exception to that.

So I decided on this one to have a bit of fun, and post some gibberish, just to see if anyone would even notice. Yes, opening and closing the hood will not do anything except give you a bit of exercise. But hey, you actually read it, so I'm really excited about that! And who knows - maybe I'll see this hood 'solution' reposted some day, which would make me ROTFLAMO.

The bonus here is that I've also included what's almost always the solution to this issue. Disconnecting the battery can result in a FALSE P0106 code being set by the ECM. It's false if the vehicle has no associated performance issues in addition to the CEL and code. The solution is to just drive it, and the computer will reset the code and turn of the CEL, once it receives enough new data.

But, its' your vehicle, so if you want to spend time and $$ buying parts or cleaning connections, then carry on ;)
 

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I see this stuff all the time, on these forums. People post on old thread that's full of information, but don't say if they've done anything that's already been mentioned. Most of the time they never post back again, so you're the exception to that.

So I decided on this one to have a bit of fun, and post some gibberish, just to see if anyone would even notice. Yes, opening and closing the hood will not do anything except give you a bit of exercise. But hey, you actually read it, so I'm really excited about that! And who knows - maybe I'll see this hood 'solution' reposted some day, which would make me ROTFLAMO.

The bonus here is that I've also included what's almost always the solution to this issue. Disconnecting the battery can result in a FALSE P0106 code being set by the ECM. It's false if the vehicle has no associated performance issues in addition to the CEL and code. The solution is to just drive it, and the computer will reset the code and turn of the CEL, once it receives enough new data.

But, its' your vehicle, so if you want to spend time and $$ buying parts or cleaning connections, then carry on ;)
kiaguy002, Thanks for your advice.
as you suggest, I will wait a few days for the computer to gather more information and see if the problem disappears.

Thank you very much.
 

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