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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First I want to thank everyone for all of their posts. I am generally a reader, not a poster and have found answers to several problems with my sporty by reading this forum.

I replaced my exhaust manifold with a used one (the old one had a crack in it). When I made the change the O2 sensor was still on the replacement, so I just left it on and plugged it in.

With the old manifold I had a check engine lite and it stayed on with the replacement. Most of our driving is short trips and my mileage was usually about 20-21mpg. On long trips it was about 24-25.

Now my mpg is about 14. I assumed the O2 sensor was bad and bought a new one. I believe the default failure is to run the engine rich to prevent problems with too lean fuel.

Now my problem..I CAN NOT GET THE O2 SENSOR OUT. I tried penetrating oil, I tried when hot. I tried when cold. I purchased an O2 sensor socket and used an extender to get more torque and screwed up by just rounding the nut part of the sensor. My next thought is to take the manifold off and try to heat it with a torch. I am more than hesitant. I do not want to try to find another manifold.

Does anyone have any tricks or suggestions?
Could a O2 simulator be used to trick the ecu?



Thanks
Harold
 

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Caribou, Otter, Buffalo
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Common issue, cut the O2 off with a sawzall, leave the nut intact.

Using a 6 point socket and an extension on a Johnson bar.. Philip
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
update

I tried the 6 point socket and I messed up again. I applied too much torque and broke the sensor flush with the manifold. I anm now going to take the manifold off and try to get the rest of the O2 sensor out.

thanks
hd
 

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1998 Kia Sportage 2.0L DOHC 4x4 Auto.... 1998 Ford Explorer XLT 4.0L SOHC 4x4 Auto.
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Did you get it out?
 

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My Car always show engine check up in dashboard, that my engine specialist ask with me, this is O2 sensor problem with diagnostic code PO130 , did I replace O2 sensor, where O2 sensor place must be replace , and where store or weblink , I must bought this item, please info and solution for my car KIA Sportage 2000 EX.

My Friend suggested to replace O2 sensor with O2 Sensor KIA Carnival cause will be long life , is it a true ?
 

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I just replace o2 sensor with carnival, and then try to start engine, the check engine light in dashboard is off, after that for hours later check engine light in dashboard come again, in.iagnostic trouble come P0 127, how to problem solved this code, any body know to solve ,info me please soonest, thanks
 

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OBD Code P0130 refers to
The O2 sensor produces a voltage based on oxygen content in the exhaust. The voltage varies between .1 and .9 Volts, .1 indicating lean and .9 indicating rich. The ECM constantly monitors this voltage while in closed loop to determine how much fuel to inject. If the ECM determines that the O2 sensor voltage was too low (less than .4 Volts) for too long (for more than 20 seconds (time varies with model)), this code is set.
Symptoms
Possible sumptoms of OBD code P0130
Depending if the problem is intermittent or not, there may be no symptoms other than MIL (malfunction indicator lamp) illumination. If the problem is constant, then symptoms may include one or more of the following: MIL illumination Engine runs rough, missing or stumbling Blows black smoke from tail pipe Engine dies Poor fuel economy
Causes
Possible causes of OBD code P0130
Usually the cause of P0130 is a bad oxygen sensor, however this isn't always the case. If your o2 sensors haven't been replaced and they are old, it's a good bet that the sensor is the problem. But, It could be caused by any of the following: Water or corrosion in the connector Loose terminals in the connector Wiring burnt on exhaust components Open or short in the wiring due to rubbing on engine components Holes in exhaust allowing unmetered oxygen into exhaust system Unmetered vacuum leak at the engine Bad o2 sensor Bad PCM
Possible Solutions
Using a scan tool, determine if the Bank 1, sensor 1 is switching properly. It should switch rapidly between rich and lean, evenly. 1. If it does, the problem is likely intermittent and you should examine the wiring for any visible damage. Then perform a wiggle test by manipulating the connector and wiring while watching the o2 sensor voltage. If it drops out, fix the appropriate part of the wiring harness where problem resides. 2. If it doesn\'t switch properly, try to determine if the sensor is accurately reading the exhaust or not. Do this by removing the fuel pressure regulator vacuum supply briefly. The o2 sensor reading should go rich, reacting to the extra fuel added. Reinstall regulator supply. Then induce a lean condition by removing a vacuum supply line from the intake manifold. The o2 sensor reading should go lean, reacting to the enleaned exhaust. If the sensor operates properly, then the sensor may be okay and the problem may be holes in the exhaust or an unmetered vacuum leak in the engine (NOTE: Unmetered vacuum leaks at the engine are almost always accompanied by lean codes. Refer to the appropriate articles for diagnosing an unmetered vacuum leak). If the exhaust does have holes in it, it's possible that the o2 sensor may be misreading the exhaust because of the extra oxygen entering the pipe via those holes 3. If none of this is the case and the o2 sensor just isn't switching or acts sluggish, unplug the sensor and make sure there is 5 Volt reference voltage to the sensor. Then check for 12V supply to the o2 sensor's heater circuit. Also check for continuity to ground on the ground circuit. If any of these are missing, or aren't their proper voltage, repair open or short in the appropriate wire. The o2 sensor will not operate properly without proper voltage. If the proper voltages are present, replace the o2 sensor.

OBD Code P0127 refers to
The intake air temperature sensor is built into mass air flow sensor. The sensor detects intake air temperature and transmits a signal to the ECM. The temperature sensing unit uses a thermistor which is sensitive to the change in temperature. Electrical resistance of the thermistor decreases in response to the temperature rise.
Symptoms
Possible sumptoms of OBD code P0127
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
Causes
Possible causes of OBD code P0127
- Intake air temperature sensor harness is open or shorted - Intake air temperature sensor electrical circuit poor connection - Faulty Intake air temperature sensor
 
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