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weird... if you pump them on cold, they should be OK.

The only advice would be to adjust pressure on cold - the time when you get TPMS.
 

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I have filled them before going to bed, right when I get up, right after I leave, after I get to work, after work, ect. Nothing helps. I would think of a leak, but it never happens dead in the summer when temps stay above 50-60 at night.
Even when I work 12 hrs during the day and it sits that whole time, I don't get the tpms. Its only overnight. Its not sitting thats doing it, so I assumed it was temps leading to it. It does look soft in the morning.. Yet you arrive at work and light is off, tire looks fine again. How, I don;t have a clue. its only 7 miles to work now.

They have done this since day 1 of owning the car. Dealer says its normal for that tire.
 

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hmmm...
sorry for saying that, but is it TPMS light or low pressure light?
I get TPMS "error" light from time to time - no CEL, no codes - no way to tell why. For sure not pressure issue.

So, since you get a low pressure light, check the pressure. In all of them. Add to the spec and you should be fine.

In Rondo, 225/50x17 I need to add a few PSI before winter. On some colder times I add even a few more. When summer comes back, I need to release some air... Normal condition.

FOR sure I would not drive when the TPMS comes on. It means that instead of 32 PSI you got 25? Less?
 

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This topic arises from time to time just to see who was asleep during elementary science classes. As the man said, 'snake oil'.

It's worthwhile adjusting 'cold' pressure depending on ambient temperature. About 1 PSI for every 10°C difference in temperature. Tyres usually run 20°C hotter on the road.
 

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Hyperbole and facts aside for a moment........

I live in Canada, where in my province it goes from as hot as 100 degrees in the summer, to as low as -40 in the winter. All temps quoted in Fahrenheit.

Commonly our winters are in the 0 to -20 range.....going down to -40 for weeks at times. I started putting nitro in my tires 6-7 years ago, and I have never had a slow leak again.

Before, when the winter weather changed dramatically in 24 hours (a 30 degree swing in temps is not unusual) it was not uncommon for the odd tire to be soft and require some air. This has not happened since.

Now, you can say that maybe remounting it with some rim goo might have been all that was required, who knows, but in my particular climate, driving only new cars with OEM tires, having nitro made a difference.

And no, I do not own a tire shop that sells nitro.
 

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you've been putting "nitro" in your tires, as you put it, since day one, 78% of everything you put in there was "nitro".

N2 it is not the reason you aren't getting flats etc regardless of the ambient temperature. You're just lucky, which is a far better explanation that using pure N2 in your tires, for your performance over the past 6-7 years.

And to actually PAY extra money for this snake oil....well one born every minute as the saying goes i guess.
 

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I fully realize that 78 % or whatever of oxygen is comprised of nitrogen. They started putting it in certain aircraft due to the ambient temperatures encountered when moving thru thru different speed and altitude envelopes, because that 22% must have made a difference somehow. The outside air temps at 40,000 feet are similar to our extreme winters here, and as we chill and thaw, our temps can fluctuate dramatically.

Not only have slow leaks stopped, but TPMS lights have also stopped going off as well. Most TPMS systems light up if there is a .5 PSI variance.......to me, pure nitrogen reacts differently than oxygen. Obviously, something is happening here and I am no chemist, but if it works for me...........so be it.

YMMV in a different climate.
 

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As others may have said in this thread, nitrogen in the tires is to keep the tire pressure more stable in a wider temperature range. That's it.

A lot of top speed racecars and exotics have nitrogen in the tires because of the high temps generated from their higher tested top speeds (higher speed, higher tire temp, higher tire pressure). I don't really think its worth the extra cost, but if your shop does it for free, sure go for it.
 

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I just had a flat tire that the repair shop plugged and they filled the tire with regular, not nitrogen.

So I guess it varies by who is selling what.
 

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Physics 101: The actual difference is made by the water/moisture content in the air inside the tire.
Some shops run a de-humidification device (called commercially "Compressed Air Dryer") after their compressors, and that puts the air in the same category as the nitrogen - low to no moisture. But it costs money to buy one and uses extra electricity to run.

The problem with the water/moisture vapors is that, at low temperatures, will partially condensate (and eventual fully condensate) inside the tire. That is called a "Dew point temperature".
The pressure will drop because liquid/solid water takes less volume than vapors of water. There are even diagrams that show the relation between water partial vapor pressure and temperature - they are used in HVAC world.

In regenerative desiccant dryers of the heatless variety, at 100 psig, such a dryer will usually have a dew point rating of minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit, though sometimes the dew point can drop as low as minus 100 degrees.
 

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I fully realize that 78 % or whatever of oxygen is comprised of nitrogen. They started putting it in certain aircraft due to the ambient temperatures encountered when moving thru thru different speed and altitude envelopes, because that 22% must have made a difference somehow. The outside air temps at 40,000 feet are similar to our extreme winters here, and as we chill and thaw, our temps can fluctuate dramatically.

Not only have slow leaks stopped, but TPMS lights have also stopped going off as well. Most TPMS systems light up if there is a .5 PSI variance.......to me, pure nitrogen reacts differently than oxygen. Obviously, something is happening here and I am no chemist, but if it works for me...........so be it.

YMMV in a different climate.

wow i musta missed this one, but the outside air temp at 40000 feet is around -60°C. Air temp drops roughly 2°C per 1000 feet from surface ambient. That is a FACT any pilot is aware of.

Show me when we hit -60°C anywhere in Canada? Nothing even remotely CLOSE to that....anyplace there are roads anyway.

N2 is used in aviation because it is more stable with temperature swings. LARGE temp swings. Temp swings that can go from +60°c sitting on the sun baked ramp somewhere in the African summer to the aforementioned 40000 foot cruising altitude. And that swing can occur in 15 or 20 minutes.

KIA issued a TSB plainly stating that N2 in tires offers NO benefit to owners. That's a KIA TSB!

You are spreading uninformed mis-information.
 

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Sorry for the late reply, but I don't get down here to the rest of the forum often.

Could I suggest Timmins, Ontario perhaps ? It is the coldest place in Canada apparently.

My point was that anecdotally, it seems to prevent slow leaks in my experience.

We just finished a solid month of consistent -30 to -40 weather every day here in Calgary, the coldest February on record in 25 years according to the news media. So, if you drive outside and then park inside your heated garage (like many do) you get the 50-60 degree celcius temperature swing I spoke of, well within the time frame you mentioned.

Even if you don't however (my wife gets the garage at our condo, and I get the street) I've had slow leaks in the colder temps here before I started using nitro, and now I don't.

YMMV.............

FWIW I am not spreading misinformation at all. Their TSB says it adds "little, if any, appreciable value"...........not "none" as you stated.
 

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Just my experience, make what you want of it. I was actually on the scene of a car show where a Bugatti was going to run for the show. The guy asked a bunch of us if we had an air compressor. Initially we all said no, but then I remembered I had a cheap cigarette lighter one from Wally world. They used it to top of the tires before they ran it 200+ mph. IMO that debunks nitrogen innthe tires period!
 
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