Kia Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
2013 Sorento, Suzuki V-Strom
Joined
·
506 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Five weeks now on the new Sorento.

The parking brake went too far down. The adjuster is under the car, about under the left rear passenger seat. I tightened that until the parking brake felt normal.

The tire pressures were high. I set to 33 psi. The spare was low, 50 psi. I pumped that up to 60. The compact spare tires are minimal for operation anyway, and a low one is really useless.

The headlights were poor. They were aimed too low and one was lower than the other. The height adjustment takes a 6 mm hex key (Allen wrench). These took about 2 full turns on one and 2-1/2 on the other one to get them level and pointing down the road instead of down at the road. They're much higher and lighting the road better, and we're not getting flashed by on-coming cars.

I wanted to upgrade the bulbs. I don't want HID lights.* H9 halogens are brighter and work well for the low beams. They require slight modifications to the connector and the top "key" where it fits into the assembly. Easy to do, they work very well, no legal problems, no glare, and none of the cheezy blue tint. DIY: Converting an H9 bulb to fit H11 light socket. - RX8Club.com

I put Narva Rangepower +50 H1 bulbs in the high beam spots. These are brighter but slightly shorter bulb life. One concern is that I wired the daylight running light function as noted in another thread, and that is running these bulbs. We'll see what the DRL function does to the life span of these bulbs. H1 bulbs
http://www.kia-forums.com/2011-xm-s...t-running-lights-2011-sorento.html#post347096

There is no good upgrade for the 881 fogs or any of the other bulbs.


*HID in the projector low beams might work OK, but there could be KIA warranty issues, plus it is more work to do. HID in any reflector assembly is a very poor idea, so I didn't put them into the highs or the fogs. In any light assembly, especially the reflector assemblies, it is critical to put the light source in the exact optical center of the reflector and lens (if the lens has optics). Even a halogen with a crossways filament won't work right in an assembly made for a halogen with a lengthwise filament. There is no way to get the HID light source in the optical center of a reflector made for a halogen bulb. If you see a car coming at you where the lights are just balls of glare, some fool put HID into his lights. And, HID bulb retrofits are illegal. Also, the higher the color temperature (more blue the light looks) the worse the light is for glare for both the driver and on-coming drivers, especially in fog, rain, highway rain haze, and snow. Short wave length blue light scatters and causes glare. Longer wave length yellow light scatters much less and produces much less glare. The less blue and the more yellow (within reason) the better the driver and other drivers can see.
 

·
Registered
2012 Kia Sorento SX, 2003 Honda S2000
Joined
·
183 Posts
The lights are not at the same height for a reason. When two vehicles are coming towards each other the light that is on the drivers side of each vehicle is aimed slightly down so that they do not blind the vehicle coming towards them. The passenger side headlight is aimed slightly higher to throw light further down the road. This configuration also allows for better light distribution on the ground in front of the vehicle which is especially handy in low visibility conditions (such as heavy rain at night, helps you see the lines better).

http://www.coolbulbs.com/HID-VISUAL-HEADLIGHT-AIMING-PROCEDURE.pdf
 

·
Registered
2013 Sorento, Suzuki V-Strom
Joined
·
506 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Doug, I agree that was the way we aimed the poorly focused sealed beam lights years ago. I don't know if that applies as much to modern lights with the sharp cut off.

In any case, on my car the driver's light was the high one.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top