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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 2016 Kia Sporage from dealer. After driving for 10km suddenly the EPB light… Hill Holder Light… EBS light came on on the display and the car become very sluggish as if the hand brake is engaged. I pulled over and turned off/on the car and the lights went off. Drove for another 3km or so and again all the lights came on and car would hardly accelerate.
Do you know what could've gone wrong?

I'm thinking it could be a major issue with the braking system.

Regards,
Sam
 

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2011 Hyundai ix35 AWD CRDi
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SEVEN YEAR UNLIMITED KILOMETRE WARRANTY against defects arising in materials or manufacture for private and general fleet and Government fleet vehicles sold from 1 October 2014

I think if it still qualifies for factory warranty and you just got it I'd be redirecting this to the dealer or Kia.

These later vehicles are somewhat complex with all the stability programs and sensors etc could be anything. Without a factory level scan tool it would be difficult to know where to start. I'd expect there's an error code stored amongst all those lamps lit up and the deactivation of those features.

I'll give you an example for my Hyundai. I have an ix35 which shares some of it's DNA with the sportage but it's a generation before this. I replaced the steering column, it also contains the steering angle sensor and that data is used by the stability program ESP. That feeds into all sots of other sensors like ABS, Traction control etc. The angles sensor needs to be zeroised at centre.
I drove it without doing this for a test, within seconds it brought up an ESP error, lost all power, barely could get 1200RPM from it, ABS came on, all 4 calipers were chattering away, basically it went nuts. Once zeroised it was normal again.

Just saying it may seem like a hand brake issue , may be brake related like sensors . What does the opertor manual say about all those amber indications ? What are the 2 in the top right corner that are blurred?
 

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2011 Hyundai ix35 AWD CRDi
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also meant to mention electronic throttle bodies these days also so control of that can be limited to a failsafe condition when these errors are triggered, that was why I had virtually no throttle
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The top one on the right is BSD (Blind spot detection). I was keep getting alert and warning sound to check BSD system. Im not sure about the other one on the left.
 

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2013 LX & 2020 EX KIA Sportages
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The top one on the right is BSD (Blind spot detection). I was keep getting alert and warning sound to check BSD system. Im not sure about the other one on the left.
Sounds like a bad sensor. Car needs hooked to a computer and diagnosed. The sluggishness is probably the car going into limp mode detecting a problem. If you just bought it from a dealer, take it back.
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like a bad sensor. Car needs hooked to a computer and diagnosed. The sluggishness is probably the car going into limp mode detecting a problem. If you just bought it from a dealer, take it back.
I contacted the dealer and they asked me to take the car to their preferred mechanic to check the car. Wondering if this would void the warranty if Kia service centre mechanics find un-authorized mechanic has touched the car?
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L
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I contacted the dealer and they asked me to take the car to their preferred mechanic to check the car. Wondering if this would void the warranty if Kia service centre mechanics find un-authorized mechanic has touched the car?
What dealer?

If a third party service shop has worked on it and its found that they caused the issue, then you guessed right, Kia will not cover the repair under warranty - Kia will certainly fix it, on your dime.

"their preferred mechanic" - is that the same one that most likely screwed it up?
 

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1995 Procharged Mustang Cobra, 2021 K5 GT Line
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You need to take to a Kia Dealer......
 

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Your warranty, assuming it's still valid, is with the dealer not some third party mechanic. If the dealer is a genuine Kia dealer then they will have their own Kia trained mechanics.
 

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1995 Procharged Mustang Cobra, 2021 K5 GT Line
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How many miles on your Sportage? The only Kia warranty left on yours is a 5 year, 60,000 basic warranty.
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The car has 7 year warranty and done 56K.
Unlike US… in Australia there isn't any laws to protect buyers when purchasing a lemon car. I can't just walk in and tell the guy I don't want the car and get a refund.
Thats really unfortunate that on my first day of owning this car I have to deal with this issue.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L
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The car has 7 year warranty and done 56K.
Unlike US… in Australia there isn't any laws to protect buyers when purchasing a lemon car. I can't just walk in and tell the guy I don't want the car and get a refund.
Thats really unfortunate that on my first day of owning this car I have to deal with this issue.
The Lemon law would not apply in this case anyway.

If you had bought from a Kia used car sales I'm confident that they would correct the issue at no cost to you.

Common law should have the seller liable to repair this, but as you've already found out, they will insist on their backyard mechanic doing it, and there's little to no chance of him getting this right.
 

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The car has 7 year warranty and done 56K.
Unlike US… in Australia there isn't any laws to protect buyers when purchasing a lemon car. I can't just walk in and tell the guy I don't want the car and get a refund.
Thats really unfortunate that on my first day of owning this car I have to deal with this issue.
People get rid of vehicles for a reason. Sometimes when you buy a used car you get lucky and get one traded by someone who just wanted a new car. Sometimes, they trade it because it has issues. If you purchased it from a smaller dealer who "has a person they like to send their cars to", at least it shows they may be committed to make it right. If their guy can't fix it, take it to a KIA dealer for a diagnosis. Then talk to the selling dealer. Once their guy knows what it is, he should be able to fix it. Might cost you a couple bucks at KIA though. "Or KIA will fix it under warranty" ?
 

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2011 Hyundai ix35 AWD CRDi
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I don't know what state you're in but there's generally statuatory warranties. My first preference in this case would be if it has full service history and has valid factory warranty that would be the best way to go for diagnosis and fitment of genuine new parts .

It's interesting to read up on it .

Do you know the vehicle history? PPSR search prior to the deal?

Here's some info copied for QLD, consumer guarantee is also worth noting.


Statutory warranty period
A 'class A' statutory warranty applies when the vehicle:
  • has an odometer reading of less than 160,000km on the day of its sale
and
  • has a built date of no more than 10 years before the day of its sale.
The 'class A' warranty expires after 3 months or the first 5,000km, whichever occurs first

Defects
A statutory warranty will cover most defects. The vehicle has a defect if a part:
  • does not do what it is supposed to do
  • has worn out so much that it no longer works.
A statutory warranty does not cover defects in:
  • tyres or tyre tubes, batteries, fitted airbags or radiator hoses
  • lights (other than a warning light or a turn indicator light used as a hazard light)
  • an installed radio, tape recorder or CD player
  • an aerial, spark plug, wiper rubber, distributor point, oil or oil filter, heater hose, fuel or air filter
  • paintwork or upholstery
  • air conditioning ('class B' statutory warranties only).
Statutory warranty also doesn’t cover:
  • accidental damage due to the buyer’s own misuse or negligence
  • anything the buyer fitted to the vehicle after the time of sale.
Repairs under warranty
A buyer must notify you of a defect. You have 5 business days to decide if you will fix the defect under the warranty. You will need to contact them in writing before the end of the fifth day.
If you don’t reply in time, you cannot refuse to fix the defect (regardless of what caused it).
The buyer will have to deliver the vehicle to either:
  • your premises
  • an authorised repairer of your choice.
You must repair the defect within 14 days, unless you have an acceptable reason.
Excessive distance
The authorised repairer should be less than 20km from your place of business. You can only use a more distant repairer if the buyer agrees to use them.
If the vehicle is more than 200km from your place of business, you may choose to either:
  • nominate the qualified repairer nearest to the vehicle's location
  • pay delivery costs to use your preferred repairer.
Warranty extensions
You must extend the warranty by 1 day for each day the vehicle is with you for repair or being repaired.
You must record the extension details, including the date:
  • the buyer brought the vehicle in
  • you returned the vehicle.

New vehicle warranty
You must still give a statutory warranty to the buyer even if the vehicle also includes a new vehicle warranty. However, the buyer can decide to have the manufacturer do repairs if they're required.

Consumer guarantees
A consumer guarantee is a promise that you make to any consumer that buys goods or services. This includes vehicles and trailers.
Consumer guarantees apply in addition to any other warranty, including statutory warranty and manufacturer's warranty.
Find out more about consumer guarantees
The consumer guarantees on a vehicle will apply:
  • for a reasonable amount of time after the vehicle is sold
  • even if the vehicle didn’t come with a statutory warranty
  • regardless of any other warranties from the business
  • even if other types of warranty have run out.
The amount of time that is reasonable:
  • varies from vehicle to vehicle
  • will depend on the price and quality of the specific vehicle
  • is not defined by when other warranties run out.
What the consumer guarantees promise
You must guarantee that a vehicle you sell:
  • is of acceptable quality
  • matches any description or demonstration model
  • is fit for any purpose that the consumer made known to you before buying (either expressly or by implication) or the purpose for which you said it would be fit for
  • is legally available for you to sell
  • comes with the right for the buyer to own and use it
  • has a clear title
  • will have spare parts and repairs available for a reasonable time
  • will live up to any other promise that you make about its quality, condition, performance or characteristics.
You cannot refuse to honour a consumer guarantee. Nor can the buyer sign them away.
Consumer guarantees will not cover:
  • accidental damage due to the buyer’s misuse or negligence
  • anything the buyer fitted to the vehicle after the sale.
How they work
A buyer can seek a remedy if a vehicle doesn’t meet a consumer guarantee.
Find out more about remedies and refunds.
Under consumer guarantees, a failure may be corrected by:
  • returning the vehicle for a refund or a replacement
  • getting repairs to the vehicle
  • compensating the consumer, such as for a drop in value.
 

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I had a similar experience with a 2011 Sportage EX and it was the Crankshaft Position Sensor wiring harness connector - just needed to be pushed together all the way. I didn't do it so don't ask me where the hell it is. :)
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
I don't know what state you're in but there's generally statuatory warranties. My first preference in this case would be if it has full service history and has valid factory warranty that would be the best way to go for diagnosis and fitment of genuine new parts .

It's interesting to read up on it .

Do you know the vehicle history? PPSR search prior to the deal?

Here's some info copied for QLD, consumer guarantee is also worth noting.


Statutory warranty period
A 'class A' statutory warranty applies when the vehicle:
  • has an odometer reading of less than 160,000km on the day of its sale
and
  • has a built date of no more than 10 years before the day of its sale.
The 'class A' warranty expires after 3 months or the first 5,000km, whichever occurs first

Defects
A statutory warranty will cover most defects. The vehicle has a defect if a part:
  • does not do what it is supposed to do
  • has worn out so much that it no longer works.
A statutory warranty does not cover defects in:
  • tyres or tyre tubes, batteries, fitted airbags or radiator hoses
  • lights (other than a warning light or a turn indicator light used as a hazard light)
  • an installed radio, tape recorder or CD player
  • an aerial, spark plug, wiper rubber, distributor point, oil or oil filter, heater hose, fuel or air filter
  • paintwork or upholstery
  • air conditioning ('class B' statutory warranties only).
Statutory warranty also doesn’t cover:
  • accidental damage due to the buyer’s own misuse or negligence
  • anything the buyer fitted to the vehicle after the time of sale.
Repairs under warranty
A buyer must notify you of a defect. You have 5 business days to decide if you will fix the defect under the warranty. You will need to contact them in writing before the end of the fifth day.
If you don’t reply in time, you cannot refuse to fix the defect (regardless of what caused it).
The buyer will have to deliver the vehicle to either:
  • your premises
  • an authorised repairer of your choice.
You must repair the defect within 14 days, unless you have an acceptable reason.
Excessive distance
The authorised repairer should be less than 20km from your place of business. You can only use a more distant repairer if the buyer agrees to use them.
If the vehicle is more than 200km from your place of business, you may choose to either:
  • nominate the qualified repairer nearest to the vehicle's location
  • pay delivery costs to use your preferred repairer.
Warranty extensions
You must extend the warranty by 1 day for each day the vehicle is with you for repair or being repaired.
You must record the extension details, including the date:
  • the buyer brought the vehicle in
  • you returned the vehicle.

New vehicle warranty
You must still give a statutory warranty to the buyer even if the vehicle also includes a new vehicle warranty. However, the buyer can decide to have the manufacturer do repairs if they're required.

Consumer guarantees
A consumer guarantee is a promise that you make to any consumer that buys goods or services. This includes vehicles and trailers.
Consumer guarantees apply in addition to any other warranty, including statutory warranty and manufacturer's warranty.
Find out more about consumer guarantees
The consumer guarantees on a vehicle will apply:
  • for a reasonable amount of time after the vehicle is sold
  • even if the vehicle didn’t come with a statutory warranty
  • regardless of any other warranties from the business
  • even if other types of warranty have run out.
The amount of time that is reasonable:
  • varies from vehicle to vehicle
  • will depend on the price and quality of the specific vehicle
  • is not defined by when other warranties run out.
What the consumer guarantees promise
You must guarantee that a vehicle you sell:
  • is of acceptable quality
  • matches any description or demonstration model
  • is fit for any purpose that the consumer made known to you before buying (either expressly or by implication) or the purpose for which you said it would be fit for
  • is legally available for you to sell
  • comes with the right for the buyer to own and use it
  • has a clear title
  • will have spare parts and repairs available for a reasonable time
  • will live up to any other promise that you make about its quality, condition, performance or characteristics.
You cannot refuse to honour a consumer guarantee. Nor can the buyer sign them away.
Consumer guarantees will not cover:
  • accidental damage due to the buyer’s misuse or negligence
  • anything the buyer fitted to the vehicle after the sale.
How they work
A buyer can seek a remedy if a vehicle doesn’t meet a consumer guarantee.
Find out more about remedies and refunds.
Under consumer guarantees, a failure may be corrected by:
  • returning the vehicle for a refund or a replacement
  • getting repairs to the vehicle
  • compensating the consumer, such as for a drop in value.
I live in NSW and we have pretty much the same ACL and dealer warranty rules. The issue came back again yesterday after driving for another 30 mins. Check BSD System alert, Hill assist, Parking Hold… EPB lights came on and car went straight into limp mode. Luckily I was in the car park so could immediately find a spot to park the car then switched it off… waited for a min then turned it back on. Called the dealer and explained the situation. They asked me to return the car to get it diagnosed. I'm thinking of returning the car and getting a refund. I think it would be a cumbersome experience as the car is under finance. I was planning to get few days off work and go for a short trip interstate but now I'm reluctant to drive the car.
Not sure if dealer can reject my refund request or would deal with it without any dramas. I lost interest in this car. I'm so upset :cry:
118349
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L
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Tell the used car dealer that the only way you'll have confidence in the diagnostics and repair is if it was done by an authorized Kia dealership and if he balks at that, let him know you want to exercise your cooling-off rights.
 
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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Tell the used car dealer that the only way you'll have confidence in the diagnostics and repair is if it was done by an authorized Kia dealership and if he balks at that, let him know you want to exercise your cooling-off rights.
Unfortunately in NSW cooling-off period is only one day! I know its ridiculous.
The dealer was operating on the weekened Sat 8:30am to 5:30pm and Sunday 10am to 4pm and I signed the contract on Friday afternoon… so one day period doesnt apply to me.
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Unfortunately in NSW cooling-off period is only one day! I know its ridiculous.
The dealer was operating on the weekened Sat 8:30am to 5:30pm and Sunday 10am to 4pm and I signed the contract on Friday afternoon… so one day period doesnt apply to me.
Quote below from fairtradimg NSW:

"Yes, the notice of a purchaser’s right to the cooling off period must be included in the contract. The notice must be in the prescribed form. The prescribed form is Form 12 in the Motor Dealers Regulation 2014"

I wasn't aware of this and dealer didn't provide the form.

"You cannot keep the vehicle during the cooling off period, unless agreed. If you keep the car during this time and you still ‘cools off’, you’re liable for any damage, other than fair wear and tear."

I drove the car already. Although haven't signed the cooling-off form.
 

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2016 Kia Sportage AWD 2.4L
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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Just to give everyone an update about the car. Dealer took it to Kia service centre for repair. At this stage I'm more inclined towards cancelling the sale and request a refund and already spoke to dealer but they keep insisting that they can fix the issue in few days.
 
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