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Kia Sportage 2016 , GT line , 185 Hp , Awd ,Iridium red
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello guys,
My car has a bit of a harsh ride on 19 inch wheels , on 17 it`s a bit better . I bought it second hand , with 55.000 km .
I understand that this car is made with a sportive character in mind , but it`s affecting me on every small bump , especially from the rear side . How is the comfort in yours ?
I`m thinking to switch to 17 inches ...but then it will be too ugly..

Also I read that on some cars ( not kia) they forget to remove some plastics from the shock absorbers( usually placed there when new cars are transported ) ...and they don`t travel all the way. Somebody knows how to slide the dust protection from the shock absorbers ?
I would like to check if those pieces of plastic are still there .

Any advice that can improve road comfort is well received....
 

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2018 Sportage SX
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I`m thinking to switch to 17 inches ...but then it will be too ugly..
Lots of people here drive on 17" and do not think it is ugly, and I'm not sure where 2" wheel difference will make a great looking car ugly. However, I would suggest not worrying about how those 2" look if the drive feels better. My Sportage is not a "float on the road" smooth drive, but I have driven in much bumpier SUVs like Subarus and the Sportage can hold it's own in it's class, bumpwise.
 

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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Said it many times but I love the change from 19 to 17" wheels. Trying to get enough money together to do a nice summer 17" wheel & tire setup.
There is a difference in the ride. I have never been a fan of low profile setups.
 

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Kia Sportage 1.6 CRDi 2018
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I wasn't very happy with my Sporty's ride when I bought either. I was expecting a more floaty - heavy feeling vehicle, though to be honest a year later I can't say that I've ever felt uncomfortable over any surface I've driven. Which is unlike other SUVs (Qashqai, Renegade, Duster) I've been given as company cars. Having said that expert reviews always commented on the Sportage's sportier handling as opposed to the Tucson's more relaxed, comfortable (but less sporty) driving manners. I did ask the dealer if I could fit Tucson's springs on my Sportage but they didn't know (they're useless as I've asked them numerous technical questions and they didn't want to get involved), though on the internet I discovered that they do fit. Anyways if you're interested in this it may be useful to drive a Tucson over a familiar route that you often drive in your Sportage to judge the ride and handling compination. One more thing I wanted to try but never came around to doing it was to disengage the antiroll bar and drive the vehicle in order to figure out whether this is responsible for the somehow strong suspension rebound.
 

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Kia Sportage 2016 , GT line , 185 Hp , Awd ,Iridium red
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9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Said it many times but I love the change from 19 to 17" wheels. Trying to get enough money together to do a nice summer 17" wheel & tire setup.
There is a difference in the ride. I have never been a fan of low profile setups.

@SSportage , your type of rims are pretty nice . Can you tell us the model please ?
For now I have a 19 inch set for summer and 17 inch set for winter , Borbet black. I cannot say that they look very nice,being black they don`t go very well with the iridium red colour of the car ,that`s why I am also reluctant to go on 17 but my back asks for it . Also , I didn`t have time to test it extensively on 17 inches as I drove it only a few miles after setup and then I had to leave the country.
I test drove Tucson before buying the Sportage , I didn`t like it at all , very wobly and the comfort was not much over Sportage...

Don`t know if the problem is with the springs or with the "high-performance" 2 stage shock absorbers..
 

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2017 Kia Sportage
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17's will give a better ride because of the larger, and more flexible sidewall. That's one of the reasons I purchased an EX over an SX. That said, also look at the tire pressure. Slightly lower tire pressures will give a slightly better ride. In no case go over the recommended pressures listed on your door plate. You can also improve the ride quality by changing tires to one with a softer compound. Look at the Tirerack ratings for ride quality. My wife has neck problems and I've purchased gel seat cushions for her and the ride is far less jarring. You do have to modify these cushions to enable passenger airbags, however, as airbags will turn off if it doesn't sense a real passenger in the seat. If you are interested in doing that, let me know and I'll tell you how that is done....
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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The only downside to going from the 19's to the 17's is the loss of tread width, which in snow is not bad, but you loose some grip in the dry, and you get a little more sidewall rollover (which also impacts dry handling).
 

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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[SSportage[/USER] , your type of rims are pretty nice . Can you tell us the model please ?

I got them and the Nokian snow tires from Discount Tire. I do get compliments all the time. Even my brother likes them.
MBM OPTIMA 73.10
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Kia Sportage 2016 , GT line , 185 Hp , Awd ,Iridium red
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Discussion Starter #9
The only downside to going from the 19's to the 17's is the loss of tread width, which in snow is not bad, but you loose some grip in the dry, and you get a little more sidewall rollover (which also impacts dry handling).
Well , I can live with that if I have some comfort . Anyway it`s not even close to a sports-car with 185 hp and 1.7 tons so I don`t drive it too hard in order for the roll to be annoying .
 

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2017 Kia Sportage
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The only downside to going from the 19's to the 17's is the loss of tread width, which in snow is not bad, but you loose some grip in the dry, and you get a little more sidewall rollover (which also impacts dry handling).
Actually you shouldn't lose any tread width because you should maintain the same width for any size. And sidewall rollover at 35 psi is practically nil so there should be NO impact on dry handling. I've tracked a number of cars and can tell you this from experience. Besides, who races a Sportage?
 
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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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Actually you shouldn't lose any tread width because you should maintain the same width for any size. And sidewall rollover at 35 psi is practically nil so there should be NO impact on dry handling. I've tracked a number of cars and can tell you this from experience. Besides, who races a Sportage?
Thread width/contact patch does vary significantly with a change in aspect ratio (if you maintain over all tire circumference). That and stiffer side walls (less rollover) is the whole benefit of the move to +1 or +2 tire/wheel combinations.

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Thread width/contact patch does vary significantly with a change in aspect ratio (if you maintain over all tire circumference). That and stiffer side walls (less rollover) is the whole benefit of the move to +1 or +2 tire/wheel combinations.

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Actually, it doesn't change if you maintain the tread width and tire circumference, only the profile changes with a +1 or +2 combo. Tread width has little to do with wheel size. You can put on a 225/17 or 225/19 on the car and virtually nothing changes. +1 simply means you've moved from a 17" wheel to an 18" wheel, not that you've changed the width of the tire at all. The only time when a +1 or +2 size actually makes a positive difference in handling is when you race the car at it's limits. On a race track, the only difference with lower profile is slightly quicker reaction times. Rollover differences are so small to make them almost non-measurable. If the tire width remains the same and the tire pressure remains the same, the contact patch also remains the same no matter what the profile changes to. That said, if you do change the tread width, whether you change the wheel size or not, there will be some differences with the primary one being less traction and more hydroplaning in wet/snow conditions. There a two reasons people move to a larger wheel/lower profile combo -- they think it looks better (the primary reason) and also if they race the car and want a very slight reduction in lap times. I can't tell what you're thinking, but my guess would be that when you think of a change to +1 or +2, you are also thinking that you're putting on wider tires. That is something I would not recommend for this car.
 

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Actually, it doesn't change if you maintain the tread width and tire circumference, only the profile changes with a +1 or +2 combo. Tread width has little to do with wheel size. You can put on a 225/17 or 225/19 on the car and virtually nothing changes. +1 simply means you've moved from a 17" wheel to an 18" wheel, not that you've changed the width of the tire at all. The only time when a +1 or +2 size actually makes a positive difference in handling is when you race the car at it's limits. On a race track, the only difference with lower profile is slightly quicker reaction times. Rollover differences are so small to make them almost non-measurable. If the tire width remains the same and the tire pressure remains the same, the contact patch also remains the same no matter what the profile changes to. That said, if you do change the tread width, whether you change the wheel size or not, there will be some differences with the primary one being less traction and more hydroplaning in wet/snow conditions. There a two reasons people move to a larger wheel/lower profile combo -- they think it looks better (the primary reason) and also if they race the car and want a very slight reduction in lap times. I can't tell what you're thinking, but my guess would be that when you think of a change to +1 or +2, you are also thinking that you're putting on wider tires. That is something I would not recommend for this car.
Again, check the tire calculator while attempting to keep the overall circumference close to the same.
 

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Again, check the tire calculator while attempting to keep the overall circumference close to the same.
Again, check the tire calculator while attempting to keep the overall circumference close to the same.
Don't get your point. Using the calculator.... 225/60/17 and 225/55/18 have the same tread width and circumference. What are you looking at?????
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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Sorry, but I was looking at moving from the 245/45-19 used on the SX to the 225/60-17 that would replace them (keeping the circumference equivalent). Moving to those 17's you lose 0.7" of width.

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Don't get your point. Using the calculator.... 225/60/17 and 225/55/18 have the same tread width and circumference. What are you looking at?????
Actually, after further research I concede! You are correct. Keeping the with the same when going from one wheel diameter to another does maintain the contact patch and circumference. I am used to doing these calculations to move to a wider tire while maintaining circumference.

Thanks for hanging in there and teaching an old dog.

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Sorry, but I was looking at moving from the 245/45-19 used on the SX to the 225/60-17 that would replace them (keeping the circumference equivalent). Moving to those 17's you lose 0.7" of width.

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Actually, after further research I concede! You are correct. Keeping the with the same when going from one wheel diameter to another does maintain the contact patch and circumference. I am used to doing these calculations to move to a wider tire while maintaining circumference.

Thanks for hanging in there and teaching an old dog.

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I would try to keep with the same width. So look at the 245/55/17 if you want 17" wheels. Wider tires than that just doesn't make any functional sense on this car. Narrower tires only make sense for snow tires. The 55 profile tires will give you a slightly better ride while maintaining handling characteristics. By the way, you can't be much older than this 72 year old...... I am older than dirt....
 
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Kia Sportage 2016 , GT line , 185 Hp , Awd ,Iridium red
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Discussion Starter #18
Guys , I don`t know how it`s in your areas , but in mine it`s simple . It must have the tyre sizes from the certificate of conformity , and in my case , the car has 245/45/19 or 225/60/17 . All other dimensions are not legal and can lead to the suspension of pinkslip by the police . So i`m obliged to go with 225/60/17 ..
 

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Guys , I don`t know how it`s in your areas , but in mine it`s simple . It must have the tyre sizes from the certificate of conformity , and in my case , the car has 245/45/19 or 225/60/17 . All other dimensions are not legal and can lead to the suspension of pinkslip by the police . So i`m obliged to go with 225/60/17 ..
We don't have that issue in the USA. I believe one of the historical problems in your part of the world was than people, because of cost, put tires that were too slim on their cars -- which is very dangerous. That problem doesn't exist here which is why we have no laws about the width of tires. We do have limits about how fast you can drive on a skinny compact spare, however, in some states.
 

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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225.60.17 is perfect. I wont re-post any pics but that's what I changed my winter setup to and looking forward to the OEM tires wearing out so I can do the same with all season tires.
Guys , I don`t know how it`s in your areas , but in mine it`s simple . It must have the tyre sizes from the certificate of conformity , and in my case , the car has 245/45/19 or 225/60/17 . All other dimensions are not legal and can lead to the suspension of pinkslip by the police . So i`m obliged to go with 225/60/17 ..
 
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