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i bought my pro ceed at 12months old ( 4751 miles ) from a car superstore. had sceduled services done at local GOOD GARAGE member. kia have voided my warranty on the fuel system and engine because garage added FORTE engine oil flush and system cleaner. when i queried this kia uk just told me to take it to court. saying the products were not recognised by kia. both the main dealer and kia uk said this. when i asked what products they use they would NOT inform me. i believe as i did not buy the car from kia directly or have it serviced by kia then they want me out of their system. has any one else suffered kia this way
 

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Cee'd VR-7
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I am very sorry that this has happened to you, but Kia make it very clear in their warranty documentation what the conditions are for cover. In fact the same applies to almost all car manufacturers. Still, look on the bright side, Kia are such reliable cars that you may not even need a warranty.
As a foot note, did you read the terms and conditions after you bough the car before having it serviced?
 

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How do Kia know that Forte was added, did you tell them or was it on the service paperwork? Why was it brought up,do you have a warranty claim then?

Did your local garage use Kia parts for the service? If they didnt you can say goodbye to your warranty anyway.
 

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All these additives do is maximise the garages profits, they are just "snake oil" and have no benefits whatsoever. Sold to gullible customers who think or are persuaded to believe they are some kind of magic.

Manufacturers don't normally void warranties because of their use simply because they do absolutely nothing, in fact some main dealers like the Nisssan one we used to go to tries to con us into having then at another £40 or so. I suspect that your "GOOD GARAGE" have failed to do the work exactly to the schedule or have used non-Kia parts.
 

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Plenty of evidence on here and the other Kia forum that the warranty has been honoured when the car has been bought form a non-Kia delaer and serviced by independants.

When your "GOOD GARAGE" serviced the car was the work carried out to the Kia schedule and was it done on time and were genuine parts used. Any of the above three will give Kia a genuine reason (not an excuse) to invalidate the warranty.

I cannot understant what you mean when you say "Kia would not tell you what products they use". In the handbook there is a list of correct oil grades and specifications for differenet engines and as far as any parts go they must be genuine Kia.

Our Kia dealer does not use any fuel or oil additives, in fact no delaer I have ever used has. The correct oil does not require any and all fuel sold in the UK meets the BS EN spec for petrol or diesel as required by Kia.

Can you give us some specific info about your car age and model exactly when your car was serviced (age and distance). If the car was a year old when you bought it the car was due for its first service regardless of mileage, was it carried out at that time. If it was not done until months later that will invalidate the warranty.
 

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Kia Ceed, MGTF, Various Jeeps new and old, FIAT 500
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Kia cannot just void the warranty despite what people on here say.
Of course they can if the car has not been maintained as per the schedule and has used Kia parts.

Its clearly stated in the warranty/service book.

Kia are only following the EU rules on servicing being carried out by independant garages. If the rules are not followed its bye bye warranty.

And just because the garage was a member of the "GOOD GARAGE scheme" does not gaurantee that they have followed the correct schedule, fitted the correct parts or carried out the work at the correct time. The "GOOD GARAGE scheme" is just a trade organisation that ensures the members meet certain standards, means little if those standards are low ones.

Warranties work both ways, the manfacturer has to replace/repair if the owner keeps the vehicle maintained correctly.
 

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Kia Ceed, MGTF, Various Jeeps new and old, FIAT 500
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No its not. Read the post I reference. Warranties are covered by UK Contract law and the ability to void a contract by either party is subject to the constraints of contract law particularly the legal principles of Materiality, Reasonable Person and Unfair Contract clauses.

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No its not. Read the post I reference. Warranties are covered by UK Contract law and the ability to void a contract by either party is subject to the constraints of contract law particularly the legal principles of Materiality, Reasonable Person and Unfair Contract clauses.

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I cannot be arsed to read the post you referenced but basically you are saying that even if I fail to get my car serviced correctly Kia cannot void my warranty.

If you believe that you are either naive or mad.

All warranties have conditions attached, ignore those conditions and you loose the warranty. EU law states that to keep the warranty intact you can have the car serviced outside the official dealer network but the garage must be VAT registered and must use genuine parts and lubricants to the correct specification and it the work must be carried out to the manufacturer schedule.
 

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Cee'd VR-7
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Would you expect Bosch to honour their warranty on your washing machine if you had it serviced by a non-approved agent?
I rest my case:shades:
 

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Kia Ceed, MGTF, Various Jeeps new and old, FIAT 500
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I am neither naive or mad, simply qualified and experienced on the matter of UK contract law covering warranties and until I retired a recognised independent expert witness in the UK court, including Crown Court and the High Court in relation to such contracts. On the basis of this experience I wrote the referenced thread to explain the exact legal position. As I noted many people were confused and I had seen incorrect advice being given. As you say you can't be arsed reading it.

There is no EU law on this matter.

There is an EU Directive (this is not a law per se) as part of the implementation of the Treaty of Rome on restrictions to competition from which the motortrade was exempt. There was a subsequent EU decision removing what was known as a Block Exemption so preventing manufacturers from insiting franchised dealers were used and instead only that servicing was carried out in-line with manufacturers guidelines by a competent person. In the UK the SMMT has suggested that VAT registration is used by manufacturers as an indicator of a garage with a suitable size to be competent. (I.e turnover above 77k). This IS NOT law and no judgement has yet been made in any UK Court of precedence that supports the VAT threshold as a suitable test, however it does seem reasonable and a legal challenge on thus point would seem unlikely to succeed. Interestingly in France the VAT (IVA) test is not used by Kia or anyone else but rather that the service agent has a SIRET number i.e. is an officially govt registered business.


If you want I can quote the relevant UK Acts of Parliament, legal judgement setting precedent and EU directives, but that would be boring.

Personally I would suggest that people read the thread I have listed or if you don't believe me check a reputable consumer web site such as Martin Lewis' Money Saving Expert site.

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For clarity I have never said that if you do not get your car serviced as set-out in the manual (i.e. you breach the t&cs) that Kia cannot refuse warranty claims BUT it rather it depends on how you breach the t&cs as to whether it is legal to void the warranty. It will almost always be illegal for the whole warranty to be voided due to servicing issues, but depending on the circumstances it would be legal to refuse a paricular claim if there has been a RELEVANT and MATERIAL breach of the owners obligations under the warranty and those obligations were REASONABLE and FAIR in the circumstance.

The capitalized word are legal definitions and a court backed by UK Statute and case law will decide what is Relevant, Material, Fair & Reasonable.

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Would you expect Bosch to honour their warranty on your washing machine if you had it serviced by a non-approved agent?
I rest my case:shades:
You have not presented a case just a supposition based on an incorrect assumption.

There is a reason why it is called a warranty as this has a specific legal meaning.

Conditions are terms which go to the very root of a contract. Breach of these terms repudiate the contract,allowing the other party to discharge (void) the contract. A warranty is not so imperative so the contract will subsist after a breach. Breach of either will give rise to damages. It is an objective matter of fact ( i.e.for a court to decide) whether a term goes to the root of a contract. But in essence breaching a warranty obligation does not allow the whole contract to be voided.

So yes, under UK Contract law just using a none approved agent is not sufficient to void a warranty contract. As a very minimum Bosch would need evidence, prima facia, that the 3rd party service had either directly or inter alia led to a failure and even then they could not void the whole warranty contract just refuse a specific and directly related claim.

This sort of threat of a voided warranty is typical of the "smoke and mirrors" used by manufacturers to scare customers that leads to the "rip off Britain" tag.

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Never read such a load of nonsense.

Its quite simple, if you don't follow the manufacturers servicing requirements you loose your warranty.

What is wrong with that, you have failed to keep your part of the original deal, why should the manufacturer keep theirs.
 

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Never read such a load of nonsense.

Its quite simple, if you don't follow the manufacturers servicing requirements you loose your warranty.

What is wrong with that, you have failed to keep your part of the original deal, why should the manufacturer keep theirs.
I agree skidlid, if he wants to spend thousands on lawyers with no guarantee of success to get a few hundred £, $, or whatever job done on the warranty that's his problem.
 

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Spencernj, are you prepared to prove this.

Buy a new Ceed and neglect it for say 5 years with no servicing. When something inevitably fails due to lack of maintenance and Kia rejects the warranty claim take them to court and spout all the nonsense you have written above.

If you are sucessful it does us all a favour, means we can neglect our cars and still have a warranty.

If you are unsucessful you are out of pocket and the remainder of people posting on this thread are proved correct.

How about it.
 

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I agree skidlid, if he wants to spend thousands on lawyers with no guarantee of success to get a few hundred £, $, or whatever job done on the warranty that's his problem.
What worries me most is some people who read this forum may actually believe what spencernj has written and think the terms and conditions in the service book do not have to be adhered too and Kia will simply roll over when challenged.

Such posts are dangerous and missleading and could cost forum users dearly if they follow the advice given.
 

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Please read above I have never said that if you do not follow the conditions that they cannot refuse a claim but rather that a warranty contract cannot be voided by the breach of a particular requirement.

I am surprised how many of you are unable to accept the opinion of a suitably UK qualified expert. For background the last court case I worked on was EDS -V- BSYKB in 2009/10 which was a £700M claim and on which I appeared at the High Court as an expert on such matters and was on the stand for two days and spoke on the terms of the implied warranties given by EDS to BSKYB. I was engaged at that time by DLA Piper one of the UK largest litigation practices. (Just Google eds bskyb spencer-jones which is my surname, if you don't believe me).

My two clients post court case this have used my advice in relation to warranties in ICT within building contracts of value £380M and £500M, before early retirement this year (when I moved to France and bought a UK Kia).

At law school the difference between a contract condition and a warranty is something you learn on day one. Look at Contractual terms in English law - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

On my last car I had this very issue of them claiming the warranty was void due to mechanical work and parts used done by a none approved Mercedes dealer after an accident, due to work done by the insurers approved repairer. A simple recorded letter to the MD of Daimler Chrysler UK pointing out UK law and noting my intent to pursue the matters through the court made them change their mind!

PS. Unlike disbeliever I do not intend to bang on this point, if people chose to ignore free legal advice (that would have cost £200 an hour when I was in work) and pay for repairs they could get for free that is up to them. Also for those who google further will discover that my expertise is ICT Contracts not automotive BUT the legal principles in terms of warranties are identical. If you wish to disagree please cite the UK case law and statute on which you rely as I have done. Also sate your legal qualifications and track record including significant cases and courts you appeared in, as I have Done. I qualified in
1982 at Liverpool John Moore's and post graduate at Manchester in 1985.
 

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Come on spencernj, you are comparing warranties on huge projects to warranties on a car. Whist you client was quite happy to rack up legal costs on a £700million claim I don't think you would be happy to spend the same amount if the diesel pump packed in on your Ceed.

We are talking about the real world with real people here, not the world occupied by multinationals with huge budgets.

Totally different scenarios.
 
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