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Discussion Starter #1
This isn't really just isolated to Sorento's actually as I have had this issue with all KIA's with the smart key and even remember having to do the same on the Mitsubishi Outlander/Lancer's with a fast key/push button start.

Every time a vehicle equipped with this feature has a dead battery we have to use two sources of power (two jump boxes/a jump box and a car hooked with cables/two cars with cables) to get the cars to start. If you try to only use one source of power you just get rapid clicking from the engine bay.

Can anyone shed some light on this? The reason I'm asking is because I want to see what the deal is so I can have my parts department order a jump box that has enough juice to do by itself if possible. Having to jump a car in this manner in front of a perspective customer is a sure way to turn them off real quick!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I thought about including that in the post. The boxes are fully charged.

I'm starting to think that it's not the box that's the issue but actually the state of the battery.

You see these cars that I'm/we are jumping are on the showroom and are completely drained of any power in the batteries. The car does absolutely nothing when attempting to start. Perhaps the cells are too far drained to be started even with a fully charged box.

I'm not certian of how a jump box works or is designed to work (supposed to be capable of jumping a car with a fully drained battery or if they have to have a minimum amount of voltage in the battery to be able to get the car to crank???).

Anyone?
 

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Race Blue MY12 Skoda Octavia RS TDI Manual
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I'm not certian of how a jump box works or is designed to work (supposed to be capable of jumping a car with a fully drained battery or if they have to have a minimum amount of voltage in the battery to be able to get the car to crank???).

Anyone?
A jumper box is basically a car battery with cables and clamps on the end.
You connect it up, and the car uses the power from the jumper box (we'll call it the 'other battery') to actually start the car.
Then, when you disconnect the 'other battery', the car runs off its own battery.
Because you're in a show room, you're probably not letting them run long enough (like a 20min drive) to recoup enough energy to actually give them some charge.

You'd be best off buying a 240v AC battery charger, and connecting it to every vehicle in the yard - one a day. Just to make sure there are no issues.
Might be worth replacing all the dead batteries.
Once a car battery drops below about 9v (around 10% battery capacity is something like 11.5v) its worth replacing, because later down the track, your customers are going to complain about prematurely dead batteries.


EDIT: I don't think you guys use 240v, but you get my point. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
A jumper box is basically a car battery with cables and clamps on the end.
You connect it up, and the car uses the power from the jumper box (we'll call it the 'other battery') to actually start the car.
Then, when you disconnect the 'other battery', the car runs off its own battery.
Because you're in a show room, you're probably not letting them run long enough (like a 20min drive) to recoup enough energy to actually give them some charge.

You'd be best off buying a 240v AC battery charger, and connecting it to every vehicle in the yard - one a day. Just to make sure there are no issues.
Might be worth replacing all the dead batteries.
Once a car battery drops below about 9v (around 10% battery capacity is something like 11.5v) its worth replacing, because later down the track, your customers are going to complain about prematurely dead batteries.


EDIT: I don't think you guys use 240v, but you get my point. :)
I do.

I checked with parts yesterday and today I was informed that the boxes we have currently are 900a and that they are going to order some with 1700a to see if that does the trick. We shall see...
 

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2011 Kia Sorento EX V6 AWD & 2010 Hyundai Sonata SE
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If you read the manual.. you are suppose to put the fob in the glove box slot when you have a very low battery.
That only applies when the battery of the actual FOB itself is low. Not the vehicle.

To the OP. I have had to boost a few dead cars at my work that use the 'Push To Start system' and have had no issues at all.
 

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2012 AWD Sorento GDI EX
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Kia

I wrote to Kia's customer support, asking if they had any specific instructions for jump starting the Sorento. I was worried about burning up the car's computer on start up.. The next day I found a message on my phone. The Chirpy Kia Support gal said they had no idea how to jump a Sorento, to go talk to the dealer.

I suppose we're breaking new ground on this matter. All I want to avoid is burning up a $900 engine/UVO computer trying to jump the Sorento. It would be just my luck that it wouldn't be covered under the warrantee.

Without specific instructions, I will set the jumper cables and wait awhile for the battery to charge before turning on the ignition.

Just a side note, My mother is law's Lexus cannot be jumped. You can start the car, but as soon as you disconnect the cables, the engine dies. I gather the Lexus alternator doesn't work if the battery is low.
 

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2012 Sorento EX FWD GDI Titanium-Silver, 2005 Honda Accord EX-L
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I haven't looked at the fuse box that would be under the hood to see but there should be a main fuse that would blow if one were to criss cross the jumper cables accidently to prevent damage to any other electronics in the vehicle. It happened to me once and the only thing I hurt was my pride.
 

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If either the battery or the alternator is bad, sooner or later you will have a problem. If you have both, much worse.

When the battery is bad, you will have a problem starting your car. Boosting the battery will have little effect on the battery as it will not be able to hold a charge. If you can get your car started, you may get to where you're going with the alternator alone. If the car demands too much electricity and the alternator can't/doesn't provide it, the car may turn off. Then you need another boost.

If the alternator is bad, the battery will eventually drain and you will have a problem starting your car and keeping it going. When the battery is fully charged, all will seem well. As the battery becomes depleted, and since the alternator is not regenerating electricity, it cannot keep the car going and the car will turn off. If you get a boost, you will be fine until the battery level diminishes below a certain level.

The battery is mostly for starting your car and from that point, the alternator usually provides the juice to keep it going. The alternator also recharges the battery. The battery is electricity storage for starting the car and for whenever there is a momentary demand that the alternator cannot deliver.

That's my understanding :)

I once had a bad alternator. Got home driving between 20 and 25 km by three or four jumps from kind passersby. I turned off as much interior lights, fans, etc and tried to press the brakes as little as possible. Replaced the alternator myself. This was a 1990 Jeep Cherokee. It's easy to remove the battery and have it (load) tested at a local car shop, like Canadian Tire. Helps to determine if it's the battery or alternator. If still under warranty, best to let the dealer handle it. The battery warranty may be pro-rated...I believe I saw this in the warranty manual. May differ between regions.
 
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