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Discussion Starter #1
I just saw this video where a guy try to climb a little terrain elevation and he just got stuck and all the traccion escapes from the right front wheel.


Go to minute 1:08

I wonder if this is normal. I mean this car supposedly have tracion control.

thanks
 

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2013 Sorento EX V6 AWD
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**shrug**

It appears to be a FWD model, not AWD. Even with traction control, I wouldn't expect a FWD crossover to be able to negotiate a sand dune...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
if you go to minute 2:10 you clearly can see traccion in the rear wheels so it should be 4WD or AWD
 

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2013 Sorento, Suzuki V-Strom
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The Sorento does not have limited slip differentials. What you saw happens. Some momentum to get over the hump would help.
 

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2013 Kia Sportage EX
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His approach angle was all wrong. But personally, I would not take my Sorento off-roading. It's really just a car with a SUV body and not designed for anything but maintained roads. If I need to go off the beaten path, I use my GMC Sierra Z71.
 

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White 2012 SX AWD
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Yes, this can happen. If one wheel on each axle has no traction, without limited slip differentials, the wheels without traction spin freely. All of the above comments are correct though about what the Sorento was designd for.

Best thing to do in that situation is to have some momentum, lock in 4wd and choose the best approach angle to try and avoid having one wheel on each axle withut traction.
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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I just saw this video where a guy try to climb a little terrain elevation and he just got stuck and all the traction escapes from the right front wheel.

I wonder if this is normal. I mean this car supposedly have traction control.
Traction control usually means electronic limiting of traction while accelerating in slippery conditions. As illustrated in the video, the Sorento is obviously unsuitable for even moderate off-road.

As one poster said, "It can happen". I remember getting stranded in front of a friend's house where there was a landscaping feature in the lawn; normal RWD car with no LSD. Was able to get enough traction by hanging out of the open front door with the engine idling in Drive.
 

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2013 LX I4 GDI AWD, 2006 S2000
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Notice that the driver's side rear wheel is off of the ground (look under the car). If one wheel on each axle is without traction and no LSD, then no go. I think the test driver planned this failed attempt. Most people who know how to drive off road would have chose a different approach angle.
 

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2015 Sorento EX V6 AWD Ebony Black
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Would this still happen with AWD lock on?
 

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This is what you get with crappy suspension travel and no locker on the axle. A limited slip wouldn't have even helped here since this guy was managing to get his wheels elevated. Limited slips really don't work that well. The eLSDs that some cars use now do work that well and would have fixed this problem. The new Hyundai Santa Fe has such a system and would almost definitely not have been stuck here.
 

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Typically:

2WD, Open differential = 1 wheel drive
2WD, Limited Slip or Locking differential = 2 wheel drive
4WD, Open differentials, open transfer case = 1 wheel drive
4WD, Open differentials, locked transfer case = 2 wheel drive (front + rear)
4WD, limited slip rear differential, locked transfer case = 3 wheel drive
4WD, limited slip rear differential, open transfer case = 1 (front) OR 2 (rear) wheel drive
4WD, limited slip front + rear differential, locked transfer case = 4 wheel drive (pretty rare because of driveline stress when you turn)
4WD, limited slip front + rear differential, open transfer case = 2 wheel drive (either front or rear)

AWD usually has a viscous-coupled "transfer case" and therefore isn't completely open, but isn't locked either. Usually there is a torque split, but (AFAIK) if there is no traction on the front or rear it acts as an open differential. AWD can also have limited slip differentials front and rear, but I don't think most crossovers have limited slip on either (It's more for high performance racing like Mitsubishi Evo / Subaru WRX).

I don't know how the Sorento's transfer case is setup, but if it really has a "lock", then knowing what KLS said about the open differentials, you actually have two driven wheels (one front, one rear).
 

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2015 Sorento EX V6 AWD Ebony Black
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This is what you get with crappy suspension travel and no locker on the axle. A limited slip wouldn't have even helped here since this guy was managing to get his wheels elevated. Limited slips really don't work that well. The eLSDs that some cars use now do work that well and would have fixed this problem. The new Hyundai Santa Fe has such a system and would almost definitely not have been stuck here.
Theoretically, If either the front, or rear, or both, had a limited slip (positraction) differential here, wouldn't the wheels on the ground have driven the vehicle forward, regardless if the other wheels were spinning, or not, in the air? That's what I was always led to believe.
 

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2011 Sorento V6 AWD
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Yea looks like a staged attempt to me. A stock FWD has no business trying that, even though he could have done it if he knew what he was doing. That would not slow me down but I have awd and better tires.
 

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Theoretically, If either the front, or rear, or both, had a limited slip (positraction) differential here, wouldn't the wheels on the ground have driven the vehicle forward, regardless if the other wheels were spinning, or not, in the air? That's what I was always led to believe.
Theoretically it would depend on the LSD setup. A Torsen would not work to transfer any torque with one wheel in the air, unless you applied the brakes while pushing on the accelerator (old hummer trick). A viscuous limited slip differential can transfer torque with one wheel off the ground, but usually those have such a limited ability to transfer torque that with one wheel off the ground they are unable to send enough torque to the wheel with traction to get the vehicle moving. The electronic clutch coupling mechanisms like the Sorento has really work surprisingly well, they function more like an "automatic 4WD" than an actual "limited slip". But, as was noted above, the Sorento only has one such coupler, and it links the front and rear axles, so if each axle has a wheel off the ground (or with little to no traction), the center coupler would do no good.

If the Sorento also had a multiplate clutch on the front or rear axle this guy never would've had a problem. If it had better articulation of the suspension to keep the tires in better contact with the ground this would have likely never happened. Finally, what a lot of companies have begun doing, is really getting the stability control system to become much smarter and apply the brakes to a single spinning wheel, this allows torque to "flow" through the open differential on a single axle to the wheel with traction and get it going. Subarus implementation is called VDC and works surprisingly well. They call these eLSD or electronic limited slip differentials, but they (in practice) work more like a locker (that is they transfer torque better than a LSD), the price of course being likely shorter brake life. Hyundai has put a similar system on the new 2013 Santa Fe that they are calling torque vectoring (which it is not, Hyundai is exaggerating, but its still a welcome addition to the drivetrain logic).
 

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... Finally, what a lot of companies have begun doing, is really getting the stability control system to become much smarter and apply the brakes to a single spinning wheel, this allows torque to "flow" through the open differential on a single axle to the wheel with traction and get it going. Subarus implementation is called VDC and works surprisingly well. They call these eLSD or electronic limited slip differentials, but they (in practice) work more like a locker (that is they transfer torque better than a LSD), the price of course being likely shorter brake life. Hyundai has put a similar system on the new 2013 Santa Fe that they are calling torque vectoring (which it is not, Hyundai is exaggerating, but its still a welcome addition to the drivetrain logic).
My BMW 135i actually did this in liu of a "real" limited slip differential. It's becoming a trend with the racing-lite crowd because it's so much cheaper than a real limited slip. The torque vectoring stuff is pretty amazing, lots of the cars now defeat torque steer with it, and even help "steer" the car back into a lane if the computer detects you're crossing into the next lane. The downsides to this stuff, is when pushed hard, it will dump an awful lot of heat into your brakes. I could see this happening if you were (hard core) off-roading with an eLSD, or applying too much gas on the track out of corners. When that happens, the car will usually go into a "limp home mode" until things cool off (Which is better than nonfunctional brakes due to fade)
 

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My BMW 135i actually did this in liu of a "real" limited slip differential. It's becoming a trend with the racing-lite crowd because it's so much cheaper than a real limited slip. The torque vectoring stuff is pretty amazing, lots of the cars now defeat torque steer with it, and even help "steer" the car back into a lane if the computer detects you're crossing into the next lane. The downsides to this stuff, is when pushed hard, it will dump an awful lot of heat into your brakes. I could see this happening if you were (hard core) off-roading with an eLSD, or applying too much gas on the track out of corners. When that happens, the car will usually go into a "limp home mode" until things cool off (Which is better than nonfunctional brakes due to fade)
A lot of the new technology really is impressive, glad to hear the implementation in your beamer works well.

If I were doing serious off road work (which I never do, most I do is go through field, rutted trails, and logging roads in and around the hunting camp) I would want a true center locker, and probably a rear locker as well. The multi plate couplers like in the Sorento can overheat if used too much (at which point they will shut off and give you a warning light on the dash to let you know), and overuse of an eLSD seems like it could lead to a warped rotor(s) due to massive heat, and would likely lead to much shorter brake parts life.

That said the multi plate coupling units have shown their worth over years and across nearly every single car brand, and I am sure that the eLSDs are on their way to doing so. I would prefer both setups in vehicles I own, since my vehicles spend nearly their entire life on the road, and when they are not on the road the "off road" conditions are not particularly difficult to traverse.
 

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I like the current awd. they're not really offroad and/or 4wd. I had a Jeep cherokee with a center locking differential that I could engage/disengage with a lever in between driver and passenger seat. Pain in the a__. A lot of additional maintenance and failures. Cost and inconvenience not work it for what the SUVs are typically used for these days.
 

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I had a buddy back in college with an XJ that blew out the rear u-joint. SO whadya do when you're a poor college student? He drove around as a FWD (4 Hi -- I think he had the full time xfer case) jeep for a few days until he could get a new one pressed on :eek:
 

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2013 Sorento AWD EX-V6 Luxury
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I just don't understand this video, I was gone hunting with my car and got no problem like this and Ive been to far more bad situation then that. In water grass along a river and I get out of it easily. in swamp on a field with my friend hunter who has some big pickup 4x4 and my sorento did the job !

I think this guy was paid to show poor performance ! ;)
 

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2011 Kia Sorento EX V6 AWD & 2010 Hyundai Sonata SE
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Go to 1:00 in the video...not sure what to believe at this point!

 
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