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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The direct injection system in Sorento engines is fantastic for fuel economy/efficiency. But the downside is that carbon constantly builds up on the cylinder valves (since no fuel comes in through the air intake to clean the valves, as it did in older fuel-injected engines). The way to combat this (without taking your engine apart) is to perform an intake treatment with something like CRC GDI Intake Valve Cleaner every 10k miles or so. This will help keep the engine running smoothly, especially at idle. Here are the steps:

1. Open the hood and remove the plastic engine cover.

115381


2. Disconnect the hoses connected to the main intake hose at the following points (using some pliers to loosen the clamps):
115382


115383


3. Disconnect the MAP sensor wire harness.
115384


4. Loosen the circle clamps that secure the main air intake hose (one on the air filter housing side, and one on the throttle body side). This requires a Phillips head.
115385


115386


5. Remove the main air intake hose by grabbing it with two hands on the air filter housing side, and pushing hard toward the throttle body. Then lift up, and pull it off the throttle body side.

6. Follow the directions printed on the can of CRC GDI cleaner, and spray directly into the throttle body.

Just make sure the throttle body opening isn't slanted downward at all, or the treatment will run back out instead of soaking the valves.
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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Nice write up! Thanks!
Any one out there care to take on the 2.0L Turbo Motor and procedure for cleaning?
 

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2016 Sorento EX V6
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I really think this issue is overblown. I use top tier gas most of the time and at 76k miles so far so good. I dont idle the car for long periods of time or do a bunch of short trips though.

Never seen an issue in the 2016 and up Sorento forum on carbon build up...
 

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2017 Sorento Ex Turbo GDI
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Nice write up! Thanks!
Any one out there care to take on the 2.0L Turbo Motor and procedure for cleaning?
I second this. I don't think they have a throttle body; the air cleaner prevents access; and I have no idea which of the hoses it would be safe to use. Also, I have never seen a discussion on the pros and cons of blasting broken off carbon deposits though the cylinders. Is this really a good idea for the drive train?
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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Discussion Starter #5
I second this. I don't think they have a throttle body; the air cleaner prevents access; and I have no idea which of the hoses it would be safe to use. Also, I have never seen a discussion on the pros and cons of blasting broken off carbon deposits though the cylinders. Is this really a good idea for the drive train?
Open your hood, remove the plastic engine cover, and take some pics near the main air intake hose (coming from your air filter housing). We can probably point out the places you can safely disconnect and spray through. Basically, you can spray anywhere inside the main air intake hose, but I've found that some of the overspray collects in the reservoir connected to the main intake hose. So that's why I recommend removing the hose completely now.

As for the pros/cons, think about what is happening all the time in your engine: carbon builds up on the valves, but some is also passing through the combustion chamber. This happens all the time. If you let the carbon build up for years, and then did a treatment, yes, that might mess with your engine internals or the exhaust. But if you start doing the treatment before it ever gets really bad, the negative effects should be minimal.
 

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2020 Sorento SX
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I second this. I don't think they have a throttle body; the air cleaner prevents access; and I have no idea which of the hoses it would be safe to use. Also, I have never seen a discussion on the pros and cons of blasting broken off carbon deposits though the cylinders. Is this really a good idea for the drive train?
All fuel injected vehicles have a throttle body, it's how you control the amount of air into the engine and therefore the speed of the engine.

The idea of cleaning off carbon deposits is to help the air flow past the intake valves and to do it before big chunks break off and prevent the valves from closing completely affecting the efficiency of the engine.
 

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Sorento LX V6 2018
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.

As for the pros/cons, think about what is happening all the time in your engine: carbon builds up on the valves, but some is also passing through the combustion chamber. This happens all the time. If you let the carbon build up for years, and then did a treatment, yes, that might mess with your engine internals or the exhaust. But if you start doing the treatment before it ever gets really bad, the negative effects should be minimal.
Although I have no problem spraying through the elbow on the intake hose, I do agree that it's probably a better preventative item than a fixit item. I think if I had 100,000 miles without every treating the engine, I probably wouldn't apply this cleaner and would more than likely take a borescope to the engine before I decided it needed an more extensive treatment. My hope is that this cleans the valves while they are only slightly dirty. And, it may eventually be a completely unnecessary treatment as there seems to be a number of owners claiming 100K+ miles without any driveability issues. I still believe that properly warming up the car and getting those surfaces hot is critical to keeping them as clean as possible. Short drives will not be kind to a GDI engine.
 

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2019 Kia Sorento LX 3.3L GDI V6 - FWD (Sparkling Silver)
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The direct injection system in Sorento engines is fantastic for fuel economy/efficiency. But the downside is that carbon constantly builds up on the cylinder valves (since no fuel comes in through the air intake to clean the valves, as it did in older fuel-injected engines). The way to combat this (without taking your engine apart) is to perform an intake treatment with something like CRC GDI Intake Valve Cleaner every 10k miles or so. This will help keep the engine running smoothly, especially at idle. Here are the steps:

1. Open the hood and remove the plastic engine cover.

View attachment 115381

2. Disconnect the hoses connected to the main intake hose at the following points (using some pliers to loosen the clamps):
View attachment 115382

View attachment 115383

3. Disconnect the MAP sensor wire harness.
View attachment 115384

4. Loosen the circle clamps that secure the main air intake hose (one on the air filter housing side, and one on the throttle body side). This requires a Phillips head.
View attachment 115385

View attachment 115386

5. Remove the main air intake hose by grabbing it with two hands on the air filter housing side, and pushing hard toward the throttle body. Then lift up, and pull it off the throttle body side.

6. Follow the directions printed on the can of CRC GDI cleaner, and spray directly into the throttle body.

Just make sure the throttle body opening isn't slanted downward at all, or the treatment will run back out instead of soaking the valves.
You're a superhero. Thank you so much!
 

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2017 Sorento Ex Turbo GDI
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Open your hood, remove the plastic engine cover, and take some pics near the main air intake hose (coming from your air filter housing). We can probably point out the places you can safely disconnect and spray through. Basically, you can spray anywhere inside the main air intake hose, but I've found that some of the overspray collects in the reservoir connected to the main intake hose. So that's why I recommend removing the hose completely now.

As for the pros/cons, think about what is happening all the time in your engine: carbon builds up on the valves, but some is also passing through the combustion chamber. This happens all the time. If you let the carbon build up for years, and then did a treatment, yes, that might mess with your engine internals or the exhaust. But if you start doing the treatment before it ever gets really bad, the negative effects should be minimal.
As Rick pointed out, I misspoke when I said the engine didn't have a throttle body. What I meant to say was that I didn't think it had a mass air flow sensor. At any rate I did as suggested and took a picture of the area in question. I see three possibilities; one at 6 o'clock; one at 9 o'clock and one at 12 o'clock, although that one looks a little problematic due to the "L" shaped fitting. I await advise on which to use.
115389
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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Discussion Starter #10
As Rick pointed out, I misspoke when I said the engine didn't have a throttle body. What I meant to say was that I didn't think it had a mass air flow sensor. At any rate I did as suggested and took a picture of the area in question. I see three possibilities; one at 6 o'clock; one at 9 o'clock and one at 12 o'clock, although that one looks a little problematic due to the "L" shaped fitting. I await advise on which to use.
View attachment 115389
The circle clip at 4 o’clock. Loosen that, push the hose toward 10 o’clock, and pull it up just enough so you can spray inside there. I think that’s the safest point to spray.
 

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Sorento EX V6 2018 on 5/16/20. Ebony Black.
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I really think this issue is overblown. I use top tier gas most of the time and at 76k miles so far so good. I dont idle the car for long periods of time or do a bunch of short trips though.

Never seen an issue in the 2016 and up Sorento forum on carbon build up...
I think the reason so many people are interested and want to do this, is to keep the valves as clean as possible for longevity at 200-300K miles. More like a long term preventative maintenance plan.
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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Discussion Starter #12
I think the reason so many people are interested and want to do this, is to keep the valves as clean as possible for longevity at 200-300K miles. More like a long term preventative maintenance plan.
Exactly. The carbon never stops building, but it it builds up slowly over time. So you can go years and never notice a real problem. But if you wait too long to treat it, the valves could potentially get fouled up enough to where it's now too risky to do an intake treatment of any kind, because you'd be pushing larger carbon chunks through the engine and out the exhaust.
 

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2014 Kia Optima SX-T
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Just did this to my 2.0T at 60k. Somebody else on the forums told me how to do it :) Feel the same way about GDIs and carbon building so hopefully this helps.

My engine wasn't idling rough or have cold start misfires before I did the treatment. The engine might idle slightly smoother after. I can't really tell a whole lot of difference. Didn't see a lot of smoke while doing this process and didn't get any puffs of smoke driving around after the heatsoak. I'm thinking I'll do this again next oil change or maybe every other oil change at first because I haven't done anything until now. Clean it up a little and then maybe do a routine treatment it every 6-10k.
 

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mine has 2.4 L 4 cyld engine and if I remove the clip as shown in the picture and spray from that end in that big hose then is that the proper way?


115433
 

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Sorento LX V6 2018
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mine has 2.4 L 4 cyld engine and if I remove the clip as shown in the picture and spray from that end in that big hose then is that the proper way?



View attachment 115433
Closer to the throttle body would be better as you will get some pooling of the cleaner going through the entire intake track from the access point indicated.
 

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mine has 2.4 L 4 cyld engine and if I remove the clip as shown in the picture and spray from that end in that big hose then is that the proper way?


View attachment 115433
When I sprayed a can of CRC Intake Cleaner last Sunday, I removed the vacuum hose to the left of the red arrow in the attachment pic. It's the hose nearest the big rippled tube, not the one slightly further back.
Mine is the 2019 Hyundai 2.4 GDI.
View attachment 115433

The only sdpot beyond that point is loosening the big hose clamp at the throttle-body / intake - then spraying directly there. Not much pivot room for aiming the spray can there, unless more items are removed first.
 

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When I sprayed a can of CRC Intake Cleaner last Sunday, I removed the vacuum hose to the left of the red arrow in the pic. It's the hose nearest the big rippled tube, not the one slightly further back.
Is this the place you sprayed crc? I assume you also have 2.4 L 4 cyld engine correct?

115435
 

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Yes, the one on the left<<<<<
 
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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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Happy Trails.....since you have the turbo motor would you be so kind and show us where you sprayed the CRC into?
Since the turbo is pushing air, even at idle, were you able to actually get the spray into and past the throttle body?
Thanks!
 

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I just used crc intake valve cleaner, followed all the instructions, the car is running fine however check engine light is ON. Any suggestion?
 
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