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2016 Kia Sorento SX+ 3.3L V6 (red)
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Discussion Starter #1
For my fellow western Canadians (and others in cold climates): How is the heat going? In my 2016 Sorento, even with plugging the car in while it's parked, it's taking about 15 minutes to get it to where the car is actually warm. And it never seems to even get really all that hot; even with the heat set on "HIGH", the fan at max, and the top and bottom vents going, it still doesn't seem to get to the point of "wow, it's really hot in here, I should turn it down." The heated seats and steering wheel are great though.

How is everyone else's Sorento doing in winter? Any issues getting it nice and toasty inside?
 

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2019 KIA Sorento SX - 3.3L GDi V6 - AWD
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Same with my 2019
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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I tend to run the RPMs up a bit on a super cold day by staying in lower gears until the car is fully warmed per the temp gauge on the dash. That at least gets the temp to where it's going more quickly. But like you, I never would have bought a heated steering wheel, and now I engage it every time! Takes about 2 blocks and the gloves come off.
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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Don't let your car idle for many minutes in the cold. That's terrible for your engine, and it will significantly shorten its life. The only thing worse than letting it idle for a long time is to drive it right away after starting it up and revving it above 3k rpms. Those two scenarios are where most of the wear on your engine is going to come from.

I don't want to find out, but I would guess it would take about 10-15 minutes for my cabin to feel warm after startup. If you want to keep your car for 8+ years, I would just accept the fact that you live in Canada and deal with driving in a cold car for a few minutes. Start it up, let it idle for 1-2 minutes, then be on your way.
 

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Sorento 2017 EX v6
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In -40C I let it idle for 15 mins and it's OK in the cabin, if I crank it to 25C it gets pretty toasty after another 25 min.
 

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2019 KIA Sorento SX - 3.3L GDi V6 - AWD
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2016 Sorento EX V6
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I would never have an auto car start for the simple reason it is bad to idle you engine.... especially in the cold.... and especially a DI engine.

Just start it up, drive, and keep the rpms low. Less wear and carbon buildup than idling!
 

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2016 Sorento EX 2.0T
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I haven't been driving the Sorento as much lately since it has the child seat in it and my wife uses it most often now. However, back in Dec 2017 when temperatures where like this I recall driving on the highway and noticing the heater seemed to be struggling keeping the cabin warm. I also had to keep the manual front defrost on to keep the windshield from fogging up, for some reason the auto defog didn't do much.

On the nice side we had it outside this time last year for a week when temperatures were like this without plugging in the block heater and never had any starting issues in the morning.
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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rejestered,

Why is idling your car bad for the engine?
When the weather is colder, your car's computer senses this with the feedback it receives from the MAP sensor. This causes the engine to run richer than it normally would (like in the summer, for example). The computer knows it has to inject more fuel because cold air is denser and requires more fuel for ignition to take place.

The result of this is unburned fuel getting on the cylinder walls and effectively cleaning them. That's nice if your walls are caked with carbon, but it's not nice if they're in good shape (because the fuel will mix with the engine oil, which causes the walls to deteriorate much faster than they normally would).
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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? The MAP sensor is for measuring local barometric pressure. Perhaps you are thinking of the MAF sensor, which measures total air (which incorporates density, which is partly a function of temperature).
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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? The MAP sensor is for measuring local barometric pressure. Perhaps you are thinking of the MAF sensor, which measures total air (which incorporates density, which is partly a function of temperature).
Pretty sure the MAP sensor in the 2016+ is a 2-in-1 for both pressure and temp.
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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No, it's got a separate barometric pressure sensor. But I keep tripping over the terminology. Kia does still have a separate BAP, and they eschew the MAF in favor of the MAP + IAT sensor pair. Too bloody many acronyms.

BTW, I have yet to figure out what they do with the BAP sensors on these engines. You can almost completely air starve one to the extent that it should appear to the MAP to be operating at 20,000' elevation, and there's no seemingly no comparison to the BAP data that would throw a red flag to say that's a problem. Cover 80+% of your air filter in film some time, and note that the vehicle gasps and stumbles all over itself, especially at heavy throttle (lack of air kinda does that), and yet the ECU throws NO codes even while struggling to lean out the mixture and keep things running.

If the poor thing is air starved and working at the very bottom of the trim table, and yet the barometric pressure indicates sea level, you'd think the conflict would either claim the baro sensor was shot, or that there was a severe air restriction, or better yet, suggest that with that kind of data mismatch, a person really should check both. ECU does neither -- at least not as of 2016.
 

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2016 Sorento LX V6 AWD
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No, it's got a separate barometric pressure sensor.
Yes, there are separate sensing mechanisms, but I'm saying they're both included in the same part (which is more commonly referred to as the MAP sensor).


On my Yamaha outboard, it's called a 'sensor assembly' which is a more accurate name I suppose.
 

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The barometric sensor is definitely a separate component. The MAP sensor and the associated IAT takes care of the incoming air flow/density measurements rather than using a MAF as used to be the case.
 

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2016 Sorento SX Turbo AWD (sold)
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For my fellow western Canadians (and others in cold climates): How is the heat going? In my 2016 Sorento, even with plugging the car in while it's parked, it's taking about 15 minutes to get it to where the car is actually warm. And it never seems to even get really all that hot; even with the heat set on "HIGH", the fan at max, and the top and bottom vents going, it still doesn't seem to get to the point of "wow, it's really hot in here, I should turn it down." The heated seats and steering wheel are great though.

How is everyone else's Sorento doing in winter? Any issues getting it nice and toasty inside?
It's normal. 2014, 2015 & 2017 3.3 Sorentos in the family over the years and none provided what we western Canadians would consider acceptable heat output. My 2.0 turbo was slightly better but not much better.
A bit of advice, keep the fan on low until the motor reaches operating temperature. The heater core acts like a small radiator and the more air you pull through it, the longer it takes for the motor to reach operating temperature.
 

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2017 Sorento SXL
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this is normal. you dont want to idle for that long. it's not good for the engine. you want to let the engine warm up, 1-2 min MAX and then start driving. It will never be HOT idling.
 

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2016 Sorento SXL
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MAP-BAPIAT.jpg


Will have to check. It's what drives several of the P222x codes when it faults. It is in there between the intake and the air cleaner and the throttle body, where a MAF sensor might otherwise sit. IIRC, Kia calls it the "BPS". It's part of a dual assembly with the IAT. The MAP sensor is separate from that assembly. You can see where they hook up in the wiring diagram, above. The diagram doesn't call out the IAT specifically, but it is the 'device' on the right hand side of the block called "Barometric Pressure Sensor".
 
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