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2019 KIA Sorento SX - 3.3L GDi V6 - AWD
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It depends on what was meant by "fuel system cleaning".

If you are using "TOP TIER GAS" (and if you're not, you should be), then there is no need to have your fuel system "professionally" cleaned.

See: Home | Top Tier Gas


I also recommend, as @SoNic67 suggested above, using a "aftermarket fuel system cleaner" before every oil change (this is what I do).

See THIS POST


Richard
 
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Soul 2019+
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4 Posts
If you get fuel in the US don’t worry about it. Almost all fuels sold here are Tier1 fuels. If you regularly fill up with Chevron or Shell you are definitely safe as both use great fuel additives.


Let Those Who Ride Decide
 

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2012 Optima EX 2.0T
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It depends on what was meant by "fuel system cleaning".
On a separate note, my understanding is that fuel system cleaners do not actually clean intake valve deposits because DI systems inject the fuel after the intake stream (i.e., intake valve is not washed with fuel). I have a 2012 Kia Optima EX 2.0T falls into this scenario because it is a GDI engine, I believe.

The KIA dealership quoted me $357 for a "Complete Fuel System Cleaner" which includes:
  1. MOC additive
  2. Cleaning/brushing of a ??? part (not fuel injector) - advisor couldn't elaborate/explain
  3. But the intake manifold is not removed and no cleaner solution is used
Does this KIA service actually remove the carbon build up at the intake valve then for a GDI engine?
 

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Sportage LX AWD 2014, Forte LX+ 2014
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992 Posts
On a separate note, my understanding is that fuel system cleaners do not actually clean intake valve deposits because DI systems inject the fuel after the intake stream (i.e., intake valve is not washed with fuel). I have a 2012 Kia Optima EX 2.0T falls into this scenario because it is a GDI engine, I believe.

The KIA dealership quoted me $357 for a "Complete Fuel System Cleaner" which includes:
  1. MOC additive
  2. Cleaning/brushing of a ??? part (not fuel injector) - advisor couldn't elaborate/explain
  3. But the intake manifold is not removed and no cleaner solution is used
Does this KIA service actually remove the carbon build up at the intake valve then for a GDI engine?
If intake mani isn't coming off then they cannot clean intake valves by scraping or blasting.
While I know some VW/Audi and BMW dealers offer valve cleaning service by blasting them, it's a liability for most, if not done properly and it costs more, usually $600+
 

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2012 Soul Base
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I don't know the specs on different years and models, but GDI (Gasoline Direct Injection) engines where the fuel mix doesn't cross the intake valve are the most important to do intake cleaning on. A big part of the problem is that the Positive Crankcase Ventilation system puts the vapors from the crankcase into the intake manifold so that it is drawn into the engine when the intake valve is open and is burned. Over time the debris in the vapor builds up on the intake valve, where it carbonizes from the engine heat had builds up to where it eventually will cause problems. Indirect injection, like throttle body or multi-port, injects before the intake valve, so the fuel mix tend to wash the intake valve, so there's little or no buildup. I bought my 2012 Base Soul to tow behind our motorhome, and it had low mileage, had been well maintained (even came with the maintenance records), but nothing showed whether the intake had ever been cleaned, so I bought the chemical kit and did the cleaning myself, hoping that it didn't have enough buildup that it needed mechanical cleaning. I'm retired now but the shop I worked in did a lot of VWs, which had big problems with the buildup in their GDIs, and we did walnut shell blasting when needed, so I had a plan B if needed. On engine teardowns, the oil control rings on the pistons often carbon up too, but that seems to happen after the intake valve is already pretty crusted up, and chemical cleaning often will get rid of problems there, too. All you do it inject the chemical into the intake until the can is empty, then shut the engine down for a set time (I tend to add 30 minutes or so, so that crud in the rings can loosen up better) and then you take it for a drive to flush out the crud. Man did mine burn a bunch of crud out. And I felt like I was driving a new car. I also added a fuel additive to the tank, plus did an oil and filter change. I was really surprised by how much more power the car had, plus my fuel mileage has improved. This picture shows the simple setup. You pull the intake hose and then insert the yellow hook shaped tube (note red arrow), put the intake hose back on over the yellow tubem put the correct size orifice in the hose from the can, then press the valve on top of the can and let the foam inject with the engine running. Easy.
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Sportage LX AWD 2014, Forte LX+ 2014
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CRC IVD cleaner is very common and a good product that's available at many places and reasonable priced, car owner with a Phillips screwdriver can do the cleaning at home or parking lot.
 

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2012 Soul Base
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CRC IVD cleaner is very common and a good product that's available at many places and reasonable priced, car owner with a Phillips screwdriver can do the cleaning at home or parking lot.
I've heard nothing but good about it. I think we stuck with Berryman's because you didn't have to manually spray it into the intake (just snap the button in the locked open position) but that may have changed. I told the lady who grooms our pups that I'd do her Hyundai so will check it out.
 

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2020 Soul LX, AT
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79 Posts
I apologize, but I just don't understand fuel system cleaning, to the extent being talked about here.
This is a four year old thread, with only 10 posts. Not what I'd call a 'Hot Topic'.

As suggested and encouraged by KIA, I put a bottle of "Techron" in my gas tank every 3k miles, usually before an oil change, with NEVER any indication that I need anything else. My Soul just runs Great!

Thank Y'all for coming.
 

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2012 Soul Base
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I apologize, but I just don't understand fuel system cleaning, to the extent being talked about here.
This is a four year old thread, with only 10 posts. Not what I'd call a 'Hot Topic'.

As suggested and encouraged by KIA, I put a bottle of "Techron" in my gas tank every 3k miles, usually before an oil change, with NEVER any indication that I need anything else. My Soul just runs Great!

Thank Y'all for coming.
That's a good question and I can sure see how the issue can be confusing. There are actually two separate issues, fuel system cleaning, and de-carboning the engine. Carbon buildup has always been an issue (I remember my dad kicking our 57 Chevy into passing gear now and then to "clean the carbon out" as he would say). In the past the carbon buildup tended to be in the combustion chamber and mainly on the top of the piston and in the grooves on the pistons where the compression and oil control rings are installed. The fuel system cleaning with the additive does a variety of things, like removing moisture from the system, cleaning varnish from internal areas of components, like the injectors, and providing increased lubrication that protects the internals while they've being cleaned. An additive like the Techron you're using is money well spent. The carbon cleaning doesn't seem to be mentioned much in the KIA manuals, probably because the extent of the carbon buildup wasn't well known at first. Now that we have seen problems on Direct Injection engines experiencing carbon buildup, manufacturers like CRC and Berryman's have developed products to deal with that can clean the carbon buildup, provided it's not too severe. If they want to do the pressurized fuel system cleaning as a preventative measure and you've been following the fuel additive schedule, I don't think I'd do it. On the other hand, doing a carbon cleaning I think is important on a GDI engine. Since I bought my car used with just over 70K on it I did it because I wasn't sure whether it had ever been done. My car ran well and I did it to prevent future problems but I feel like I'm driving a different car. I'm getting better mileage. but shortly after doing the carbon cleaning I did a full service that included full synthetics and fuel additive, so not sure how much each part played in the mileage improvement. It's only 1 or 2 mpg, but at today's prices I'll take it.
 

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Sportage LX AWD 2014, Forte LX+ 2014
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Fuel system cleaning (in short) consists of adding a solution to gas and such solution helps dissolving gunk in the tank, fuel pump, fuel lines, high pressure fuel pump, fuel rails and injectors. It may also help cleaning combustion chamber as fuel/solution mix enters the chamber before spark occurs.
Valve cleaning is done either chemically or/and mechanically in case fuel/air mix doesn't run over intake valves which is the case with Direct Injected engines in general. This time cleaning solution can be injected into air intake as it'll run over intake valves along with air coming into combustion chamber.
 
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