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Hello, I'm Fabrizio, I write from Italy.
I just registered and I can just do my presentation.
They are one of the forum moderators Kia sportage2011 (Forum Kia Sportage).
Since last year, many of our users have had big problems with freezing of the fuel in the filter then it turns off the motor running. We wrote to Kia Italy, who told us that "the problem depends on the quality of the fuel."
In our opinion it is not true. We are experimenting with various solutions.
The problem is exclusively on the engine 1700. The motors 2000 does not have the problem.
This is my question. Have you had any cases off to freeze diesel fuel (I am aware that your extremely cold weather)?
thanks
 

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Buondi Fabrizio,
I`m from Russia. I hope that Siberia is well known for its ringing frosts. Now it is -34° or even -43°C out there. We have no frost issues from there, nor even single complaint. In Moscow -12°C now, no information about fuel freezing in the filter too in any kind of motor.
P.S. special washing liquid freezes below 30°C - that`s the problem indeed.
 

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It can't be the engine's fault, since even insulated fuel lines will lose heat eventually.

It shouldn't have anything to do with quality, but fuel additives. In cold areas, fuel stations quietly begin to sell "winter gas"; possibly they didn't expect such cold weather in your area. Additives for sale usualy contain isopropyl alcohol for fuel injection, or methanol for carburetors (I don't know why specifically). A couple additives say they are diesel compatible, preventing gelling.
 

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In order for the fuel line to freeze on gas engines, water must be present in the fuel. Where alcohol is blended into the fuel, the problem can be severe, because alcohol absorbs water. There are several additives that prevent this while also stabilizing the fuel and providing fuel system cleaning.
For Diesel engines, the problem is similar except moisture does not have to be present. Diesel can 'gel' in the fuel lines/filters in cold weather. Again, there are additives for this, but it's true that high-quality Diesel made for automobiles already is anti-gel. If there is moisture in the Diesel, there are also additives available to dry it out. I think you need to find out exactly what grade fuel you're buying and/or consider getting it somewhere else. But in the meanwhile you will have to find out which additives you need now to clean and de-water your fuel system, based on what is available to you.
 

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Wow. I guess temperature wouldn't be an obvious cause in places where temperature extremes are unusual.

Gasoline has a far lower freezing point then water, but it still freezes (as 1saxman says, the concern is more water). Diesel solidifies as a gel, not far from water's freezing point.

If your fuel station doesn't, you need to add the antifreeze-additive. As well, the common recommendation is also to keep over a quarter-tank full, for it to hold more heat overnight. If you're in a normally-temperate climate, and global warming is making it freeze, be sure to use proper antifreeze coolant instead of water; I'm told that's a common substitute.
 

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Freezing point of gasoline depends on the blend; some hydrocarbons won't solidify until -184. Generally, gasoline freezes around -40 to -60. Anywhere those temperatures are expected, they put antifreeze alcohols in the fuel. The usual problem with gasoline is the moisture, as mentioned earlier. Diesel gels around -6 apparently.

Oh, I'm using metric, because screw Liberia and Burma ;-). Also, talking freezing points, celcius makes extra sense.
 
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