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2013 KIA Rio5 LX [6spd]
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Just purchased my 2013 Kia Rio/Pride5 LX 3 day ago! Yep, I'm pretty psyched because it's my first car I purchased myself with no help. Anyways to the questions:

The car has 7 miles on it and I have driven a manual transmission for quite a while to be pretty good at it. This is my first brand new car above the year 1991, lol and I was wondering is there was a break-in period for the clutch? Usually I can engage the clutch around 1500rpm and move forward with little to no gas. When I try to do the same with my Rio5 I get a small judder feeling before i get going. Does the clutch and flywheel need to seat itself for a certain period of time?

Later I experiment more and feel like the clutch engages a bit strong and that's why the RPM drops quickly with little to no gas. So I rev around 2000rpm to compensate for the rpm loss with a raw engagement and it seems like a smoother transition into first without the judder. Is this typical with this car? Anything above 1500rpm to engage the clutch seems odd. I wonder if being a 6-speed has anything to do with it. I really do hope there is a break-in period because I don't want to bring it to the dealer to find something wrong...(if I don't have to).

Thanks for any input in advanced.

Oh and yes, I'm new to these forums! I hope to learn a lot from here :)
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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1,236 Posts
There have been some adverse reports on RIO clutch action; seems that the cruise control switch on the clutch modifies the accelerator response and interfers with a smooth take-off. The switch normally detects clutch pedal operation and turns off the CC. For some reason, KIA thinks it's a good idea to use this switch to modify the accelerator program as you release the clutch. Trouble is, the take-up point comes earlier than full release of the clutch.

Breaking-in the clutch shouldn't be necessary, but you could try a few starts with higher RPM to see if that helps. Usually you just hold the clutch at the take-up point and roll the car away, fully releasing the clutch at about 10 km/h. Talk to the dealer if it worries you.
 

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2012 Kia Rio SLS and 09 Mitsubishi Lancer
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463 Posts
Its the programming in our ECU, it gives ideal shift points depending on how you are driving. Default is aimed at overall economy. If you just going with the flow of traffic it will get you shifting for a more quieter ride.

First gear though does shudder if you lift off too soon. Once you got it worked out you wont be doing bunny hops.

If you push the Kia harder though it will give you the second set of shift points that favour performance. It will get you shifting later so when your RPM drops in shifts you still stay within the peak torque band.

Usual break in periiod is the usual 1000km but most new cars dont need it.
 

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NA V, K3
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259 Posts
2000 seems high to engage into first, even 1500. At idle speed with no gas at all (foot off) if you let the clutch out you stall?
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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Its the programming in our ECU, it gives ideal shift points depending on how you are driving. Default is aimed at overall economy. If you just going with the flow of traffic it will get you shifting for a more quieter ride.

Usual break in periiod is the usual 1000km but most new cars dont need it.
Hmmm... But it's a manual?

No particular ECU configuration should make the car hard to drive. If that's KIAs idea of setting up manual transmission, thank goodness their autos are good. I would no longer buy a manual car.

Personally, I favour a sensible break-in period of about 2,000 km. Nothing dramatic, just mid-range RPM and no hard acceleration. No, you might not ruin an engine by ignoring the run-in period, but if anything is amiss, there's more chance of damage occurring. I start by limiting RPM to 2000-4000, gradually widening this as the engine matures to, say 1250-6000.

It's just possible that a some hard starts will knock a few rough edges off the clutch surfaces, but you shouldn't have to do that with a new car. (I guess the dealer will try that approach as a first line of attack).
 

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2013 Rio 5 EX White MT
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105 Posts
Unplug the sensor at the top of the clutch assembly under the dash and drive for a bit to see if that is what you are feeling. I unplugged mine and it now drives just like my previous 2010 manual Koup. You do lose cruise control though. I also did the motor mount mod to get rid of that clunky feeling when you accelerate and take your foot off since the stock mount is very soft and travels way too much for a manual.
 

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2013 Rio 5 EX White MT
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105 Posts
2000 seems high to engage into first, even 1500. At idle speed with no gas at all (foot off) if you let the clutch out you stall?
It idles at 600 rpm, letting the clutch out normally would easily stall. You would have to release very slowly and be burning the clutch to move without using the gas pedal. You shouldn't be lugging a new engine (under load at low rpm under 1k), probably not good for a broken-in engine too.

Maybe you meant an automatic engaging drive or first at idle being the correct way.
 

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2012 Kia Rio SLS and 09 Mitsubishi Lancer
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Hmmm... But it's a manual?

No particular ECU configuration should make the car hard to drive. If that's KIAs idea of setting up manual transmission, thank goodness their autos are good. I would no longer buy a manual car.

Personally, I favour a sensible break-in period of about 2,000 km. Nothing dramatic, just mid-range RPM and no hard acceleration. No, you might not ruin an engine by ignoring the run-in period, but if anything is amiss, there's more chance of damage occurring. I start by limiting RPM to 2000-4000, gradually widening this as the engine matures to, say 1250-6000.

It's just possible that a some hard starts will knock a few rough edges off the clutch surfaces, but you shouldn't have to do that with a new car. (I guess the dealer will try that approach as a first line of attack).
The manuals in the 1.6 all have shift indicators on the dash. It has different sets depending how your driving it. It has sets for economy/comfort and performance
 

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2017 KIA Forte5 SX, 2017 KIA Sportage EX Lux, 1986 Pontiac Fiero SE 2m6
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For any/all manual drivers, I'd recommend doing the clutch slave cylinder spring/plate removal and re-bleeding. Especially if you're comfortable driving manual. This will give you more precision in the clutch pedal and feedback. I know I've said it a few times lately - but one of the easier/better modifications for a drivers' car.
 

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NA V, K3
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It idles at 600 rpm, letting the clutch out normally would easily stall. You would have to release very slowly and be burning the clutch to move without using the gas pedal. You shouldn't be lugging a new engine (under load at low rpm under 1k), probably not good for a broken-in engine too.

Maybe you meant an automatic engaging drive or first at idle being the correct way.
No, of course auto's automatically start rolling once you lift your foot off the brake.

In manuals, you don't have to let it out slow, but obviously you don't let it out as fast as you would if you were changing gears. Just enough until it starts to catch then gas and no clutch, or if you're good, no gas (until it starts to catch and let it out faster) and not as much burning. At least not as much burning as you'd be doing at 2000rpm...

In traffic, there is no need for gas unless the speed picks up. Going from 0-3mpg (~ idle speed) doesn't put that much strain on the engine. Not like if you were trying to merge on an onramp to get on a crowded, at speed moving freeway.
 

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2013 KIA Rio5 LX [6spd]
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Discussion Starter #11
Hey everyone,

Thanks for the feedback! I've been driving my Rio5 around for a while and just broke 1000miles. I think I understand the clutch better now. I don't get the shudder as much or at all getting out 1st gear anymore. I came to realize that the clutch is just different from the other cars that I have driven.

The contact patch is much further up once you release the clutch pedal. It's almost as if its near the very top before letting go of the clutch pedal completely. It took some time getting use to.

My observations continue as I learn how to drive the car. So this is in the order of how I shift into first.

1. Clutch depressed all the way down.
2. Shift into 1st gear.
3. Slowly release clutch until contact patch is engaged.
(this is where it gets tricky IMO)
-At this point you can feel that the transmission is engaged. If you release a little further the this is where the shudder usually happens and RPMs drop because of the engagement. THEN if you release even more (clutch almost completely released) The car starts to move forward and you can actually have the car move forward with just the clutch alone.

4. If the car is moving on its own momentum by the clutch engaging I just release the clutch and gas away like normal. It also because smooth if rolling down a driveway or downhill.

5. If the car is at a stand still and isn't moving I have to add some gas as I release the clutch and most of the time I match it no problem.

I guess I just have to learn the clutch a bit better. I drove my friends Mazda 3 (6spd) and I could drive it like normal with no problems...

I'm convinced that it's just a different clutch. Thoughts?
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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The technique that I was taught was to release the clutch to the take-up point (i.e. engine slows a little or car starts to move slightly), then hold the clutch at that point and gradually apply some accelerator. Fully release the clutch once you're under way; at that stage you might be doing 10 km/h in first gear and the engine will be at 1500 RPM or so. Most experienced manual drivers will do this automatically first time in a new or strange car and will soon adapt. Once you are used to a particular car, it comes naturally. Sounds like you KIA clutch might need a bit of adjustment

Lower powered cars require more sensitivity with the clutch. I've driven a powerful car that was almost impossible to stall on flat ground.
 
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