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Here's what AMSOIL says:

Oil Myth: The color of the oil indicates when it’s time for an oil change
It’s common to assume that black motor oil has worn out or become too saturated with contaminants to protect your engine and requires changing. Not necessarily. As we saw, discoloration is a natural byproduct of heat and soot particles, which are too small to wear out your engine.
The only surefire way to determine if the oil has reached the end of its service life is to perform oil analysis. Chemically analyzing an oil sample reveals the condition of the oil, the presence of contaminants, fuel dilution and so on. Several companies offer oil analysis services, including Oil Analyzers INC.
Absent oil analysis, it’s best to follow the oil-change recommendation given in your vehicle owner’s manual or by the motor oil manufacturer. The recommended service intervals for AMSOIL products, for example, are based on thousands of data points spanning years of use.
It’s best to trust the data, not your eye, in this case. Otherwise, changing the oil could amount to throwing away good oil.


I don't trust wive's tales or rules of thumb. I trust science and testing. I do my homework and almost never have a blue face. Manufacturer's are very careful in their maintenance recommendations especially for legal reasons. In point of fact, most manufacturer recommendations have a rather large margin of safety. I worked in large corporations my entire working life. If you want to throw away good oil, then go right ahead. But I'd rather spend that money elsewhere where it can actually do some good and not waste resources or damage the environment. But recognize that your car is not any better off or will last longer with excessive oil changes. I am the same way about putting in premium gas when the car is designed for regular. I've followed manufacturer recommendations on all of the cars I've had for the last 58 years and have never had major problems other than manufacturing defects. Again, the only reason to change the oil on a car like this is that the manufacturer recommends it to maintain your warranty. There are a few exceptions like tracking your car or if you drive heavily in very severe conditions, but the manufacturer has recommendations for that as well.

I may be a bit sensitive to issues like this at this time because of what's happening. I just wish that people were more interested in science and checking the facts about things our leaders say. So yes, this is a bit of a rant. But so be it.....
That's funny.
Amsoil doesn't even make it's oil.

My other Korean 2.4 GDI with only 11,200 on the odometer looked bad at it's 4k OCI.
Looked bad at the prior oil change at 7.2k on the odometer. I did not get to see the oil change at 3k on the odometer. The dealer did the free oil change.

So yes, oil color on our gas-only GDI / TGDIs matters..... a-lot. Most-all of us are using SN Plus / SP GF5/6 oils. Some are including Dexos 1 and Gen 2 on the front labels.
You're darn-right it matters.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L, 17 Ford Edge Sport 2.7L V6, 15 Mustang 3.7L V6, 08 Harley Nightrain
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If your Owners Manual specifies one year or 7500 miles, then in your still valid warranty situation, change the oil at one year.

Keep receipts and records, if you do it yourself.
Correct.

The Owners manual specifies a mileage and time, whichever comes first, and if the OP intends on maintaining warranty cover, then she needs to follow whats stated in her owners manual.
 

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That's funny.
Amsoil doesn't even make it's oil.

My other Korean 2.4 GDI with only 11,200 on the odometer looked bad at it's 4k OCI.
Looked bad at the prior oil change at 7.2k on the odometer. I did not get to see the oil change at 3k on the odometer. The dealer did the free oil change.

So yes, oil color on our gas-only GDI / TGDIs matters..... a-lot. Most-all of us are using SN Plus / SP GF5/6 oils. Some are including Dexos 1 and Gen 2 on the front labels.
You're darn-right it matters.
If you really want to know whether it matters, you should get your oil analyzed scientifically like I did with mine. Your oil will always darken with heat and engines put out a lot of heat. That doesn't diminish significantly the function of oil. On modern engines, you're looking at whether there are things like metal shavings (i.e., large particulate matter) in the oil and whether the additive level, which does go down during use, is still beyond a minimum level. If there are no large contaminants and the additive level is high enough, the oil will work well no matter what color it is. In the old days, when manufacturing tolerances weren't as good as today, there was a correlation between oil color and effectiveness because the lack of computer controls produced more sludge and you did get metal shavings. That is just not true today.

And few oil manufacturer's really make their own oil. They get a base oil from producers and then modify it. Again, trust in science because it is pretty easy to fool your eyes...
 

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The color change is not unique to any particular brand, and it darkens earlier in Turbo charged GDI engines.

I don't change my vehicles oil based on color, and at my chosen interval of 5K miles it's only a little dark.


 

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The color change is not unique to any particular brand, and it darkens earlier in Turbo charged GDI engines.

I don't change my vehicles oil based on color, and at my chosen interval of 5K miles it's only a little dark.


When you do something based on a false premise, it is hard for any of us to admit they're wrong. Like some of the posters here, years ago I thought that dark oil meant bad oil. 30 years ago, it meant exactly that. But I have spent a lot of time on forums like this, and someone told me I was wrong. So I did some research and now test my oil on the first oil change of every new car I buy. That tells me if the oil intervals are proper and if there are any metal shavings in the system. I did this at 7500 miles on this car and the oil was just fine with about 20% left on additives. I always buy my cars new and always follow the manufacturer recommendation on oil changes. I've never had any problems. When I put in full synthetic, I tested the oil again at the 7500 mile level. that had almost 50% more life in the additives. If I weren't worried about voiding the warranty, I'd go 10k miles between changes. I still cheat on the time limits as I will go more than a year between changes. From my research, I've determined that if you run your car at least a few times a week and get it up to operating temps (which takes about 5 minutes), your engine will be just fine between longer changes. Again, if you are really worried, take a small sample of oil and get it tested.
 

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If you really want to know whether it matters, you should get your oil analyzed scientifically like I did with mine. Your oil will always darken with heat and engines put out a lot of heat. That doesn't diminish significantly the function of oil. On modern engines, you're looking at whether there are things like metal shavings (i.e., large particulate matter) in the oil and whether the additive level, which does go down during use, is still beyond a minimum level. If there are no large contaminants and the additive level is high enough, the oil will work well no matter what color it is. In the old days, when manufacturing tolerances weren't as good as today, there was a correlation between oil color and effectiveness because the lack of computer controls produced more sludge and you did get metal shavings. That is just not true today.

And few oil manufacturer's really make their own oil. They get a base oil from producers and then modify it. Again, trust in science because it is pretty easy to fool your eyes...
My used Valvoline Advanced Syn 5w30 is enroute to Blackstone Lab. Due to Covid, tracking the packaged bottle on USA highways is not currently Status-available.
The last time I did this - I could track it within 24 hours of sending it.
Now it's been 3 days and nothing shows at USPS.com. I packaged the contents exactly the same. It's packaged Incognito (plain brown box)..... no logos or markings on the brown box.

I would never ship in plain sight what Blackstone provides us with. Some of the Blackstone provided shippers get thrown away by USPS. Some of their workers see the word Oil and throw the entire package away, thinking it might leak.

These Labs don't usually measure soot /carbon, unless requested at a higher cost. Soot / carbon is what made my used oil look like crappola.
Have a GDI / TGDI folks?...... change that oil much closer to Severe Service mileage, than Maximum Mileage allow in the Owners Manual. If something happens to your engine and when the dealer tears it open and sees a crappola mess in there, they will want answers...... in writing receipts.

So never give the dealer reasons to deny you a warranty fix. Oil is cheap - so keep that dipstick looking clear for at least 1-1.5k. Changing the oil at 4K will keep it cleaner..... as will Top-Tier fuel and Dexos 1 / Gen 2 oils in SN Plus / SP / GF5/6.
 

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My used Valvoline Advanced Syn 5w30 is enroute to Blackstone Lab. Due to Covid, tracking the packaged bottle on USA highways is not currently Status-available.
The last time I did this - I could track it within 24 hours of sending it.
Now it's been 3 days and nothing shows at USPS.com. I packaged the contents exactly the same. It's packaged Incognito (plain brown box)..... no logos or markings on the brown box.

I would never ship in plain sight what Blackstone provides us with. Some of the Blackstone provided shippers get thrown away by USPS. Some of their workers see the word Oil and throw the entire package away, thinking it might leak.

These Labs don't usually measure soot /carbon, unless requested at a higher cost. Soot / carbon is what made my used oil look like crappola.
Have a GDI / TGDI folks?...... change that oil much closer to Severe Service mileage, than Maximum Mileage allow in the Owners Manual. If something happens to your engine and when the dealer tears it open and sees a crappola mess in there, they will want answers...... in writing receipts.

So never give the dealer reasons to deny you a warranty fix. Oil is cheap - so keep that dipstick looking clear for at least 1-1.5k. Changing the oil at 4K will keep it cleaner..... as will Top-Tier fuel and Dexos 1 / Gen 2 oils in SN Plus / SP / GF5/6.
Again, soot and carbon deposits are not the primary reason oil darkens -- it's heat and it is normal and does not affect the longevity of the oil. Soot and carbon used to be far more prevalent years ago. But today, it is not a major problem on a relatively new car. The reasons for this is the advancements in computer controls on engine management and the much better tolerances in manufacturing because of robots and computer controlled machines that make your engine parts. You can believe that dark oil is bad, but science and the oil manufacturers will tell you something different. What is that statement???? Don't believe your lying eyes?????
 

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Soot and carbon are real in the SX. If you take any chances with the oil you could be asking for trouble. I haven't had a boosted engine before and I was surprised at the amount of soot on the exhaust tips. As I began to take notice of other SXs, I saw that it was typical. Obviously there is going to be excess carbon/soot in the engine that is going into the oil - on the molecular level, but its still there. There are two reasons I run at least 89 octane - for it's anti-knock properties of course, but also because it is about half premium which has a better additive package for cleaning. Also the Pennzoil Platinum oil is rated very high for cleaning. These are my two main strategies for long service life of the engine and turbine, along with use of a fuel stabilizer/cleaner. So far, so good - still runs like new - quiet and smooth.
 

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Soot and carbon are real in the SX. If you take any chances with the oil you could be asking for trouble. I haven't had a boosted engine before and I was surprised at the amount of soot on the exhaust tips. As I began to take notice of other SXs, I saw that it was typical. Obviously there is going to be excess carbon/soot in the engine that is going into the oil - on the molecular level, but its still there. There are two reasons I run at least 89 octane - for it's anti-knock properties of course, but also because it is about half premium which has a better additive package for cleaning. Also the Pennzoil Platinum oil is rated very high for cleaning. These are my two main strategies for long service life of the engine and turbine, along with use of a fuel stabilizer/cleaner. So far, so good - still runs like new - quiet and smooth.
Again, I think you'll be surprised if you ever test your oil. Soot is a normal byproduct of the combustion process. Extremely little of that goes into your oil. Small turbo engines do create more soot, but that doesn't mean you'll have significantly more deposits in your oil. You should not assume otherwise. Excess soot is created if your engine runs rich. It is a myth that there are any more major additives in premium than regular if you get Top Tier gas. The "extra" additives the major brands tell you about have virtually no functionality except to get more money out of your pocket. There are so many myths about things like oil and gas for your car. In a modern car, there is no such thing as "knock" if it is running properly because of the precisely controlled engine management so there is absolutely no need for higher octane gas. Don't believe the marketing gimmicks presented to you by the oil and gas distributors. If you don't believe me, again, get your oil tested. All of us want "our babies" to get the best. But again, what you seem to believe is just not factually accurate.

A lot of people get things like K&N filters and CAI's thinking that your car will breathe better. Again, unless you mod your engine, those things are a complete waste of money

There are so many things in life that we overspend on. One of my children will only get organic foods -- but they have no more nutritional value than non-organic foods. Many store brands test higher than name brands. Many private label items are made by the same companies that produce name brands. There is no third party research that shows probiotics does anything for you. In fact, it may lessen the effectiveness of bacteria in your system.

The argument that it doesn't cost a lot to be safe is a slippery slope that costs you a lot of money over the long term without any benefit. There is a psychological argument that says if you are worried about something, then the extra money might be worthwhile for your psychological comfort so you don't worry. I'm a cheapskate. I do the research and try to understand the science and won't spend a dime more than necessary. Because I've done that for the past 73 years, I'm living a very comfortable retirement and will pass on a good inheritance to my children and grandchildren. That's far more important to me than spending extra money on my car. By the way, I've owned close to 50 cars in my life and never did anything more than what was required in the owner's manual (unless it was one of my track cars). I've never had any problems because of that....
 

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Again, soot and carbon deposits are not the primary reason oil darkens -- it's heat and it is normal and does not affect the longevity of the oil. You can believe that dark oil is bad, but science and the oil manufacturers will tell you something different. What is that statement???? Don't believe your lying eyes?????
Where in my Quoted reply did I say soot / carbon is the primary reason for darkening???

I don't have a problem with darkl oil. I have a problem with seeing nasty black oil, that carbon / soot employment shows. I have a problem with folks here that keep stretching their OCIs and their soft S. Korean rod bearings take a crap. I have a problem with the dealer opening-up an engine and seeing the engine look like crap-yard ful of caked carbon flakes and then fighting the vehicle owner over warranty coverage.

One last time I'll say this here..... keep that engine relatively clean, if you suspect you have an engine that's prone to premature engine damage.
End of story..... by me here anyways. Remove the "wait" (like at the top of this thread title) and chances are, your dealer will cooperate with your badly broken down Kia or Hyundai a little better.

Get your dipstick to show clear for 1-1.5k..... beyond your last oil change.
See Ya - bye..... at least here anyways.
 

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Where in my Quoted reply did I say soot / carbon is the primary reason for darkening???

I don't have a problem with darkl oil. I have a problem with seeing nasty black oil, that carbon / soot employment shows. I have a problem with folks here that keep stretching their OCIs and their soft S. Korean rod bearings take a crap. I have a problem with the dealer opening-up an engine and seeing the engine look like crap-yard ful of caked carbon flakes and then fighting the vehicle owner over warranty coverage.

One last time I'll say this here..... keep that engine relatively clean, if you suspect you have an engine that's prone to premature engine damage.
End of story..... by me here anyways. Remove the "wait" (like at the top of this thread title) and chances are, your dealer will cooperate with your badly broken down Kia or Hyundai a little better.

Get your dipstick to show clear for 1-1.5k..... beyond your last oil change.
See Ya - bye..... at least here anyways.
It's probably been 30 years since I've seen "nasty black oil" in any of my cars. When have you seen that in any of your cars? If you are worried about "soft S. Korean rod bearings", why buy a S. Korean car? I see my oil getting dark after 600-1000 miles. So what is "clear"? Again, test your oil rather than make a rash decision. Science and testing is a good thing. If changing your oil at every 3,000 miles is good, then changing at every 1,000 miles is even better? You should not buy a car that is prone to "caked carbon flakes" or an engine that is "prone to premature engine damage". I'm very happy with my Sportage and don't have any issues with it. My warranty is intact because I follow the recommended service. Changing the oil at intervals less than manufacturer recommended is very old thinking and just not necessary today -- especially if you use full synthetic....
 
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