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Also about the fords saying 5K mile intervales is a crock of crap. I just looked in my mustangs manual, it states oil changes every 3K miles. Hmmm where you getting your info??
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
ICellKiaz brought in the comment about Ford and the 5 & 10K oil changes, which is true. Per the rebuttal of his 02 Mustang not allowing this, this is not an apples to apples comparison. IcellKiaz was referring to, I’m sure he’ll correct me if I’m wrong, present day and concerning the myth of 3K filter changes, not something of older technology per 3K oil changes. Also, ICellKiaz did not say “every” Ford but in the past couple of years it includes the majority of cars and several light duty trucks.

I briefly mentioned Honda and their new oil filter routine. I know I’ll be called a liar but recently several of their units now call for an oil filter change at every second oil change or every 10K miles.

I was going to get into warranty concerns regarding extended oil changes. A little patience and all would have been handled but my schedule is now too tight to elaborate.

US residents can read the magneson-moss act of 1975. Send me PMs or E-mails if there are any questions & I’ll address them after X-mas or early Jan.

There’s more than one service manager in my area that ended walking away with his tail between his legs when all I did was mention the words, Magneson Moss. It's a very powerful tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #23 (Edited)
I said I’d share some personal service procedures. I was going to get into transmissions, rear ends and other areas in another thread for the benefit of all. But with all the distractions time won’t allow it, if ever. Perhaps if I get enough requests I’ll do something on my blog next year or on a small lube group I have on Yahoo. Since this tread’s intention was about the safety of using synthetics in engines, I’ll continue to finish what I started in this regard.

My 07 Cobalt 2.2 Ecotech uses an OLM= oil life monitor. Now, I’ll admit this engine is not very hard on oil. FYI this car gets about 80% of its’ mileage on the highway.

At 1,400 I swung synthetic in along with my break-in additive mix. Around 6,500 miles I dumped it and used the same synthetic. At the second oil change the OLM was around 25% and I had reset it at 1,400. At 1,400 miles it was at 90%. Due the math, had I not reset it at 1,400 at 6,500 it would have been around 15%.

I have seen a couple setups like mine run over 8,000 miles before the OLM hit zero and have reports of a few at 8,500 or so.

I’ll not run my Cobalt’s OLM to zero on conventional but I will on the current cycle with the XL 7,500 mile oil.

The next change it’s getting 5W-30 – ASL 15-25,000 mile or a once a year oil. Unless a year passes first I’ll run the OLM to zero, reset it and run it down to 50%. Then I’ll run a UOA and see how things look, I’ll estimate at that time I’ll have about 11-12,000 miles logged in that cycle.

Like the Hyundai/Kia 100K warranty GM gives me a 100K-mile drive line warranty.

I can, by the limitations of my warranty, run my OLM to zero or change oil once a year, which ever comes first and use conventional 5W-30 that meets GM spec 6094M, which most 5W-30 oils do. FYI GM spec 6094M is a cold flow test.

Now a critic might say something like, “There goes your nice warranty with that 15,000 mile oil change”. Amsoil will warranty my engine against oil related failures if I change the oil & filter per their recommendations plus I have the magneson-moss act on my side.

Our 2002 Olds Alero V-6, which I gave to our daughter 3 years ago will typically not trigger the OLM until around 4K if city driven which it gets a lot. I’ve seen it go as far as 6,800 miles before the OLM is triggered if 80-90% highway driven.

Around 5,000 I swung synthetic in it. Since I run synthetics here too I allowed the OLM to trigger and typically I had let it run another 2,000 miles or so until last Dec.

Since last Dec. the Olds has our TSO 0W-30 in it. TSO is an oil for up to 35,000 miles for normal service, 17,500 severe. There’s about 13,000 miles on the cycle and the OLM has triggered 4 times in about 11 months.

Don’t try my Olds work without guidance but it looks great!!!!!!!

Other than a leaky intake manifold gasket on the Olds, which this engine was known for & covered under warranty at 49,000 miles it’s been a stellar performer. Should also mention the intake leak was found in a used oil analysis that I normally do on a car that is close to leaving warrantable guidelines. This car has 142,000 miles on it and still gets mid 30s for highway mileage.

An OLM has no clue what’s in the engine for oil. They were programmed based on properties of conventional oils meeting certain specs and those specs are not unusual. OLMs record engine RPMs, frequency of starts, lengths of starts, the type of driving you’re doing, engine temps, continual TPS movement etc.

I could get into a couple downfalls with OLMs but time won’t allow.

Now I can hear it, “I don’t have an OLM on my Mustang & Kia”. I know and my Sonata, Jeep & Vibe don’t. My new Rondo won’t either.

The Vibe is short tripped to death and has about 35k miles. The vibe gets an oil change twice a year on XL synthetic, normally every 5,000 miles or so.

The 93 Jeep I-6 & is a beater I have out of state. Been using a HDEO synthetic for about 5 years, had used 5W-30 synthetic since about 40K miles. This poor thing has over 275K miles on it but the driveline is fairly sound. Now oil gets changed every fall or early winter, as it doesn’t get used much from X-mas thru late April.

30 years ago I would have been fearful in running anything past 4,000 until I got into synthetics. Then 4K to me was high risk but if you could have seen the insides of some of my engines even back then you’d see the light.

Engines of 30-40 years ago were also much harder on oil than most of today’s engines unless you only know stop and wide open plus oil technology has made vast improvments both in conventional and synthetic.

I’m running out of time. There’ll be more regarding our viscosity discussion.
 

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1fastkia,

I'm not even going to attempt to refute anything you said because it is just that unfounded. Let me give you a idea, I WORK FOR KIA and I know what is and is not covered by warranty. I also have a background in Mechanical and Petroleum engineering. The only reason I bought a Kia was the ability to get replacement parts for next to nothing and the fact that I don't want to rack up miles on my nicer cars. I might know a thing or two. I don't need to hear about your theorys that would violate Federal Law.

ICellKiaz out....
 

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ICellKiaz brought in the comment about Ford and the 5 & 10K oil changes, which is true. Per the rebuttal of his 02 Mustang not allowing this, this is not an apples to apples comparison. IcellKiaz was referring to, I’m sure he’ll correct me if I’m wrong, present day and concerning the myth of 3K filter changes, not something of older technology per 3K oil changes. Also, ICellKiaz did not say “every” Ford but in the past couple of years it includes the majority of cars and several light duty trucks.

I briefly mentioned Honda and their new oil filter routine. I know I’ll be called a liar but recently several of their units now call for an oil filter change at every second oil change or every 10K miles.

I was going to get into warranty concerns regarding extended oil changes. A little patience and all would have been handled but my schedule is now too tight to elaborate.

US residents can read the magneson-moss act of 1975. Send me PMs or E-mails if there are any questions & I’ll address them after X-mas or early Jan.

There’s more than one service manager in my area that ended walking away with his tail between his legs when all I did was mention the words, Magneson Moss. It's a very powerful tool.
The mm act is for modifications done to a car, not maintence.
 

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1fastkia,

I'm not even going to attempt to refute anything you said because it is just that unfounded. Let me give you a idea, I WORK FOR KIA and I know what is and is not covered by warranty. I also have a background in Mechanical and Petroleum engineering. The only reason I bought a Kia was the ability to get replacement parts for next to nothing and the fact that I don't want to rack up miles on my nicer cars. I might know a thing or two. I don't need to hear about your theorys that would violate Federal Law.

ICellKiaz out....
Im gald you work at kia. Cause not every dealer is the same.. Call berlin city car center in williston vermont and ask them for yourself if you don't beleive me. Ill get you the number if youd like!
specsx of this site will tell you the same thing. We both use the same kia dealer....
 

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A manufacturer can not void your warranty for adhering to the service guidelines in the manual. If you let them get away with it, that means you are gullible and they are crooks. Do you honestly believe everything a DEALER tells you? They want someone to come in every 3,000 miles so that they can waste that person's money, time, and non-renewable natural resources while they laugh all the way to the bank. Seriously, think about it for a second and you might see a common denominator. They make statements that make their selves money...

So again. It's your time and money. But I got a better idea. Next time you feel compelled to change your oil out prematurely, call me, and instead we can take your $20 and flush it down the toilet together. The result is similar, but instead we will have some sort of entertainment for our $20 watching it swirl down instead of giving it to a liar that just wants your money. The car is fine either way.

You are correct, not every Kia dealer is the same. So you should find a new one and your buddy too.
 

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A manufacturer can not void your warranty for adhering to the service guidelines in the manual. If you let them get away with it, that means you are gullible and they are crooks. Do you honestly believe everything a DEALER tells you? They want someone to come in every 3,000 miles so that they can waste that person's money, time, and non-renewable natural resources while they laugh all the way to the bank. Seriously, think about it for a second and you might see a common denominator. They make statements that make their selves money...

So again. It's your time and money. But I got a better idea. Next time you feel compelled to change your oil out prematurely, call me, and instead we can take your $20 and flush it down the toilet together. The result is similar, but instead we will have some sort of entertainment for our $20 watching it swirl down instead of giving it to a liar that just wants your money. The car is fine either way.

You are correct, not every Kia dealer is the same. So you should find a new one and your buddy too.
What do you mean by that first sentence? Your saying you don't have to go by the manual for your service intervales? Yes you do. Its made by the manufacturer. It says point blank there if you dont follow these recomendations it will void the warrinty. A kia worker like yourself can get by without following it cause you work there. Easy isnt it. But for the rest of the people here, I suggest you do change it every 3K. Unless this Icellkias guy is your service guy of course.

My oil changes cost me my time and like 10-11cks. Not to bad to feel like my motor is nice and lubricated with a new filter to boot... Its not premature to change at 3K. Id rather spend that 10 bucks, then spend hundreds in repair costs down the road...
 

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Like I said with the dealer here they only go by severe intervales. Driving in vt is severe so I do say its the way it is for a reson. Where else can it be -25 below, then with wind chill it feels like its -45. one day then 45 out the next. With 3 feet of snow then its 60 out. Dusty dirt roads everywhere, weird climate, summer time itll be 95 with 100% humidity. Feels like 105 outYes severe is what should be done...
Besides where can you drive where severe driving conditions are not? Not too many.
 

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If you are indeed a driver in a "severe service" application, that's fine. But you can't blanket statement an entire region. What about the guy that stores his car for the winter? What about someone that spent the winter in Florida and simply came back home near 7,500 miles. Will their warranty be voided if they weren't severe service qualified?

The service guys don't follow you around. They don't know anything you don't tell them. So if you are weak and can't handle the pressure of some guy making $9.00/hr, go ahead and be silly. But today's lubricants can more than handle 3,000 miles between changes with a few exceptions. Look up the requirements for an SL/SM rated motor oil and then tell me you couldn't go longer.
 

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If you are indeed a driver in a "severe service" application, that's fine. But you can't blanket statement an entire region. What about the guy that stores his car for the winter? What about someone that spent the winter in Florida and simply came back home near 7,500 miles. Will their warranty be voided if they weren't severe service qualified?

The service guys don't follow you around. They don't know anything you don't tell them. So if you are weak and can't handle the pressure of some guy making $9.00/hr, go ahead and be silly. But today's lubricants can more than handle 3,000 miles between changes with a few exceptions. Look up the requirements for an SL/SM rated motor oil and then tell me you couldn't go longer.

To the first statment. Oil changes no matter what have to be done at 3 months time. Even if it is a 7500 mile service. I put my car away for the winter and change the oil before it goes away and after. Thats way to many months to have the same oil. Remember the 3K or 3 months whichever occurs first.
If your guys are making only 9hr thats bad. The techs up here make well over 12.50 to start.
My biggest point isnt really the oil issue its the filter. More than 3K you might be compromising the filter media, and it might not be quite as effective. Not saying its useless but to an extent yes. Even k&n need replacing every 3K. Probably wont hurt not to but isnt your investment into a car worth that extra 30 bucks in filters a year?
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
Time is short but essentially under the Magneson-Moss act the manufacture has to prove what you did caused any issues. Some suggest this law only applies to modifications while in reality this is not the case.

Ok, going to court costs money. That’s why I use maintenance products both oil and filters that have a warranty regarding extended oil changes both in time and mileage.

People should not have to worry about this. I was simply trying to make you aware of the laws existence. However, I’d not go out of my way to test the law.

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Here’s a well-documented case regarding extended oil changes. While it’s not a car, the basic principle applies.

AMSOIL - 409,000-Mile Oil Drain Interval Mack Engine Teardown

In reality, big rig diesels have many more issues to deal with than a typical gas engine thus the bypass filtration etc. Most big diesels run what is sometimes referred to as a lube finder besides the engine mounted filters.

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

I’ve cut and pasted the beginning of our viscosity discussion all into one. There’s a break mid way to mark where we left off.

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In my every day work the one question I got hammered with the most & still do is, “What viscosity oil should I use”?

THAT even though it gets old is the best question anyone can ask. Why? I’ll answer that with a question.

What’s the most important aspect in choosing engine oil other than knowing what group of oil one should use? Yes, grouping is important. Some engines must use a synthetic. Knowing which synthetic in some cases is also important. For this discussion we’re worrying about viscosity but grouping can still play a role.

All things being equal, that being the group of oil I’m using, viscosity is the single most important aspect in choosing oil.

Most choose oil with a viscosity that we believe to be correct or at least I hope you are. But would another viscosity improve or reduce the life of the engine? Can we choose a viscosity outside a manufacturer's recommendations? Would a certain viscosity give me better fuel economy & cold start protection?

Well, yes to all in most cases. Could this mean to maintain peak efficiency I’ll have to change oil every 2-3 months due to changing weather? Ah ah.

The viscosity of oil can be listed at any temperature. However, in the interest of standardization the tests lab reports show use a low temp (100F or 40C) & a high temp (210F or 100C).

In my youth it was common to use 10 wt oil in the winter & a 30 wt in the summer.
I’ve seen where it was suggested to use a straight 20 wt year around. In reality this is one of the best recommendations I’ve ever seen even to this day for moderate temps. I remember when 10W-20 hit the market. Someone up there was watching over me.

Originally, all oils were straight weights and there’s nothing wrong with using a straight weight if the conditions are correct.

Some might think that 50 years ago or more every time the calendar flipped people were changing oil. Well, that’s sort of true. Most cars used into the 40s and thru the late 50s needed an oil change every 1,000-1,500 miles. Now think of that and think of how some complain about the few pennies they spend when they need to change oil at 3-4,000 miles. However, many cars until we got into the 50s didn’t have oil filters.

For the purpose of efficiency you want to run the lightest grade oil in your engine possible, within limits of course.

Heavier oil provides more bearing film and that's important at the lower end. If your oil is too light the bearing wear can increase.

If the oil is too heavy upper end metal wear can increase. Many might have heard of cam & valve train wear. Even in remote cases I’ve seen some accelerated piston skirt, cylinder bore and ring wear too. These issues are more noticeable in overhead cam engines, which most of us are now using.

Too thin of an oil at operating temp can cause a slight loss in fuel economy. This isn’t always true but more so in an engine that’s getting a bit tired or had an issue that caused some excess scuffing in or within a cylinder. If the rings can’t hold a good oil film you’ll get a tad larger loss in compression versus when using a heavier oil.

The trick is to find the right viscosity for your particular engine and there is no one size fits all. But, thanks to chemistry & with proper oil grouping, it’s getting darn close.

************************************************************

We have a slug of viscosity ranges to choice from but I’ll only get into the common gas applications.

In the past 25 years or so the common use of 10W-30, which became popular in the 60s has swung towards 5W-30. The swing to 5W-30 was for 2 main reasons. Better cold startup, which gives better top end AKA cam lubrication and a tad better fuel economy.

5W-20 is becoming more popular and is one I really like if the engine is in good condition & speced for it. Many use 0W-20 in cold climates & for many hybrids. My only exception with 20 wt is for the guy that lives on the Interstate. This is only my preference, which came from some personal experiences not suggestions from the refineries, test labs or auto manufactures.

Starting around 2000 5W-20 was slowly being speced to aid in fuel economy AKA CAFÉ tests. While in reality it helps a tad, much like synthetic will help a tad, it’s not a major factor unless you do a lot of short tripping & more so in winter. Here again from what I’ve seen the net result is 1-2% in normal driving. I’ve not done any testing in short trip driving but have reports of 2-3% so hey, every bit helps.

We are finding a few vehicles with very high mileage, which were speced for 5W-20, seem to work a bit better on 5W-30. This seems only to be the case in hard driving and it makes sense. Likely this is because of the cylinder issues I talked of earlier where too thin of an oil can lower efficency on a tired engine.

Recently 0W-30 has become somewhat favored & recommended with some applications. It’s one I’m now using in 2 of my vehicles. I can see where this oil could become very popular.

You may recall earlier I had mentioned where 5W-30 can break down a bit faster than 10W-30. So, how can we trust a 0W-30 for any length of time? Again better living thru chemistry and with most oil companies 0W-30 is a group IV.

For the average driver, the key is to generally find a multi viscosity that’ll give cold start up protection along with full operating temp protection, work for your particular conditions & fall within the parameters of a new cars warranty requirement. Doesn’t seem all that hard does it? No but it’s important and chemistry has made it easier.

Earlier I had talked about possibly stepping outside a manufactures recommendation. I also mentioned my using 0W-30 in my Sonata. Hyundai speced this engine for 5W-20 but will allow a 5W-30. 95%+ of its miles are on the Interstate. Amsoil gave me written coverage to use 0W-30 providing I change the Amsoil oil filter every year or 25,000 miles. This car will hit 20,000 miles annually without even trying, which is part of the reason I went for the super extended oil and have a warranty to boot. This car without question fits in a NORMAL service schedule and my dealer even agreed!!!!

Typically an auto manufacture will have few issues with using a 0W-XX for cold weather but it’s best to ask first or use a product that already covers you.

When someone asks me what viscosity oil to use I will suggest they look in their operator’s manual to try and confirm what I might suggest. In the case of our Hyundai/Kia, this is also covered in our on-line service manuals.

http://www.kia-forums.com/do-yourself/41502-online-service-manuals.html

First I want to know the main drivers driving style. Do they floor it right out of the gate or are they environmental & safety minded? Do they mostly take short trips, stop and go driving or highway driving? Do they tow a lot? Of course the make of the car weighs in. What’s the general condition of the engine, sometimes they don’t have a clue. How many miles are on it?

Hopefully you see why viscosity is the most important aspect in selecting oil, all things being equal of course.

I have to wrap this up.

Hopefully I’ve covered all the E-mail & PM questions. If I missed any it would be best to E-mail me not PM and I’ll get to them in early Jan. If I find them relevant like the past were I’ll again share the conclusions here.

What started off as a 3-4 page lesson got a bit extended. Hope you didn’t get too bored but you now realize there are many options available to you outside the common myths and mis-conceptions.

Look before you leap!

Knowledge is power!

Happy holidays

Got a little joke on my blog.
 

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My thoughts

I may be a newb on the forums but I am an employee of Ashland, the makers of Valvoline, I am also an engineering student and have taken some mechanical and thermodynamic classes. I am not trying to say what I write will be right because I may be wrong, but here goes...

First, the group V oils you mentioned are not the base stocks used in crankcase oils, they are for the transmission fluids, DEXRON-VI is a prime example. These oils/fluids can last 60k and that is why they are expensive.

Second, there is nothing wrong with conventional motor oils as long ans you change it and the filter at every service interval. Most driving classifies as severe unless you drive 80% or more highway. Stop and go city driving qualifies as severe in this industry no matter how you baby the car, which is why when you get your oil changed they will more than likely suggest a synthetic blend. As said earlier the recommended interval for severe usage is 3000 miles. If you do "severe" driving then using a synthetic oil, which protects against wear better, you can go the recommended interval which should be found in that little book no one seems to read called an owner's manual.

Third, the benefits of synthetics are as follows:
- Reduced stress on engine
- Improved fuel economy (minimal at best)
- Reduced sludge deposits
- Reduced engine temps (minimal again)
- Reduced friction
- Longer oil life

Now here is the deal. The hydrocarbons in synthetic oils are all the same size and shape. They are smaller than the average conventional hydrocarbon, and since they are more of them can fit on a surface, increasing the surface area touched by the oil molecules, and each molecule has the potential to absorb a certain amount of heat, thus the more molecules you can fit on a surface the more heat the oil can absorb. This helps decrease the engine temp. Since the molecules are smaller that also results in reduced friction, and less stress on the engine. Synthetics are also made from a premium base stock and usually has additional synthetic additives and detergents, so they do not sludge up as easily which allows them to last longer. Also, since they prevent sludge develops it allows the engine to work more efficiently which improves fuel economy but the biggest gains are not even 1% improvement.

If you want to switch from a conventional to a synthetic oil and have a lot of miles I would recommend using a high mileage synthetic such as Maxlife Full Synthetic, which has some other additives that recondition the seals and gaskets to help prevent leaks, or pick up some engine treatment which will do the same thing.

Lastly, I would never go over the factory recommended oil recommended service interval no matter the oil used, and 3000 miles is still the most widely recommended interval just because most driving is classified as severe. I use a K&N Oil filter and Valvoline Synpower in my GMC Canyon and still change the filter and oil every 3000 miles. In my 2005 Optima I use Maxlife Full Synthetic, and will change it every 3000 miles.

In summation, for conventional oils, follow the recommended service intervals in your owners manual if you drive mostly highway, or every 3000 miles if you do alot of stop and go, do alot of city driving, or tow anything. For synthetic uses, use the recommended intervals unless you are a like me and take more care of your car than is healthy (mainly bc I get a case of Maxlife Synthetic for less than $20).

Peace.
 

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well said, like I said, conventional oils are perfect for your everyday commuter car. A misconseption is that "if I use syth. my car will last longer" Not true in any way shape or form. There are cars that go well past 300K miles and have only seen conv. oils.
Yes if you stress the crap out of your car on a daily basis, then you might wanna use synth. But if you just drive your car normally and not like a maniac, your fine with regular oils.
 

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Reading all of the replies on this leaves me confused on the calender time between changes. I have a show Corvette that has litterally only had 3500 miles on it since it was completely rebuilt in 2003. I try to take it out for a short trip every month or so durring the winter time to maintain the charging system and keep all the fluids flowing through it (gas, coolant, transmission, rear-end). It was my understanding from years of show car circuts that this would also allow any condensation in the oil to evaporate through the crank case ventalation system after reaching 220F or so.
I did change the oil from regular to synthetic after breaking in the engine. Since then i have only changed the oil once, about May 2007, and seriously don't intend to change again for another couple of years (maybe 2000 miles). Is this wrong? Durring show season it is mostly driven on highways to shows. Durring the winter i only hit the highway for a 10-15mile drive at about 75-80mph then take her home.
It seems wasteful to change it every year on this car, so what is correct? She is on 10-30 mobil1 now with a very rare bronze filter that is reused after cleaning. But then again she is a 450hp (before the NoS that i haven't turned on since tuning in 03) beast built with some of the best parts available.
 

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Oil breaks down over time just as it does at high heat. I would not drive the car on oil that has sit for more than 6 months, especially if it is a high performance car. But thats just me.
 

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Maybe i should try to clarify how i am looking at this to get a better response on just how long that sitting period should be.
We learned in basic organic chem that oil is hydrophobic. Thus the milk-shake emulsification you see when there is a lot of water in the oil while running...the water gets forced around the oil molecules under pressure with air. But if you put that in a container almost all the water (the anti-freeze does some bonding) settles out in an aqueous layer.
Now mix 50/50 fresh oil and water in a jar and in minutes you have 2 pure layers. Let that sit for days...the water can not evaporate out since it is sealed under the oil and layers can not mix. ??? My question as to just how long is partly from this fact.
Now take a quart of oil and top off your car...but you only used half. If you put the lid back on and set it on the shelf and accidentally forget about it (especially with a synthetic) for a year or so, Isn't it still good enough to go in your car? How long do some stores end up having them sit on a shelf? In these 2 examples the oil can't break down since it is out of contact with air born contaminants or direct UV (or any real light) to cause break down. The other part of my questioning is that the engine is basically sealed just as well... So, just how long before it REALLY, TRUTHFULLY starts to break down? And how long until that break down honestly means that the oil is no good and should be changed?
I am not trying to be a smart ___ . I am trying to find out if there is any real science or long term data research to address this and give me a good calender time i really should use to plot changes that will not waste the oil and still give my engine the protection it needs.
In this day and age conservation should be viewed before corporate propaganda and real world usages should be looked at closer to get a maximum time and use out of resources.
So who holds this truth?
I know that synthetics were developed to increase longevity and are less prone to breaking down. I know that oil can't break down with-out mechanical or chemical interaction. So were would that leave the show car guys if they want to help conserve by getting the most usefulness out of the synthetic oil? When does time take precedence over mileage? Just how far can i trust synthetic oil?
 

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I would never let me mustang have its oil for over 6 months. (usually 3 or 3K miles, except over the winter months). But once spring hits, no matter how many miles Ive driven, I still change it.
Im not gonna risk my motor on not changing oil when you should. And with you high hp engine, I def,. wouldnt dare let my oil sit there for that long.
I drive my car all of 5K a year if that. It gets 2 oil changes in summer, 1 when I take it out in spring and one when I am gonna put it away for winter. Unless I went more than 3K in a summer which I havent yet.
 

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Oil breaks down over time just as it does at high heat. I would not drive the car on oil that has sit for more than 6 months, especially if it is a high performance car. But thats just me.
Welcome:00000732: I am glad that you are here.;) We may not agree entirely but the discussions should become more interesting.
 
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