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Kia Sedona 2017
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I am replacing my brakes.
1) Should i bleed brakes?
2) If yes, is there a manual?

I know start from the farthest, but looking for a video or something more specific like what type of Brake oil etc.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L
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11,753 Posts
Hi,
I am replacing my brakes.
1) Should i bleed brakes?
2) If yes, is there a manual?

I know start from the farthest, but looking for a video or something more specific like what type of Brake oil etc.
What do you mean by "replacing my brakes" - just pads, rotors, calipers, .......?

With brakes being a key piece of safety equipment on a car, is it safe to take on such a job if you don't have sufficient knowledge of what the job entails? - do you have someone that could assist?
 
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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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1,374 Posts
Yes, please heed this warning from ron1004. The braking system on your vehicle is the most critical single item. Please have a knowledgeable friend help guide you or take it to a trusted shop!
 

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Kia Sedona 2017
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am replacing brake pads only. And yes, I think I can muster the skills to replace brake pads.My question was not about replacing the pads, but the requirement of bleeding the brakes. What determines if it is required (besides spongy pedal)?
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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Yes, the brakes should always be bled when performing a brake job. It is not wise to push old burnt fluid back into the system because the ABS valve body can be harmed/contaminated creating other issues. Always bleed each wheel starting with the furthermost from the master cylinder, passenger rear 1st. Have a friend help you. Have her press the peddle down gently then you crack open the bleeder screw until the pedal goes to the floor. Put a rubber hose over the bleeder screw to channel the old fluid into an old jar or coffee cup. Do not release the pedal until you have re tightened the bleeder screw. If you do air will enter the system, and air is compressible! Bad Ju-Ju! Do this until fresh clean brake fluid comes out. You will need to top off the master cylinder several times during this procedure! Use a good quality DOT 4 synthetic fluid. Repeat all remaining sides.... Good luck!!
And BTW, the brakes may feel a little spongy until the pads seat them self on the rotors and the pad binding material starts to off-gas from the pads....~50 miles. Let us know how you make out!!
 
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09 kia spectra ex,'11 Dodge Journey AWD,04 Chry. T&C, 08 Pontiac G6 gt
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Also extremely important to NOT let the brake fluid reservoir get to low and draw in air as member LouO posted of multiple check/filling of fluid will be needed. You do NOT want air to be drawn in from either end. Particularly important with ABS systems, if they do get air in them they can be a nightmare to bleed air back out.
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L
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I am replacing brake pads only. And yes, I think I can muster the skills to replace brake pads.My question was not about replacing the pads, but the requirement of bleeding the brakes. What determines if it is required (besides spongy pedal)?
Your question was about "replacing the brakes" which could mean a few things, and now that you've informed us that it is only the brake pads being replaced can we offer the appropriate answer which is NO you would not need to bleed the brakes if all you're doing is pad replacement.

Of course, if the fluid is very old, more than three years, then it would be a good time to replace the brake fluid.

On my 2015 and 2017 vehicles I've tested the brake fluid and replacement is not required at this time.

PTE Tester Calibrated for for DOT 4 Brake fluids
 

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'16 Sedona SX, '09 Genesis
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There is nothing about the replacement of brake pads that REQUIRES brake fluid change. You don't have to, and the brake system will work just as well as before... assuming the rotors are in good condition and not gouged, pitted or worn beyond the minimum service thickness.

That said, by the time your brake pads are worn to a point of needing replacement, more than likely it has been some 2-3yrs since the last time any brake service was done. Most brake fluids are hygroscopic, which means it likes to absorb moisture from contact with air. Over time, the absorbed moisture will degrade the fluid and lowers its boiling point. The entrained water is also more likely to corrode internal brake parts (think little valves and springs inside a typical ABS unit). So, it is a good idea to flush the brake fluid with new fresh fluid.

Brake fluid replacement schedule is in the owner's manual. Every 2 yrs, IIRC. Realistically, I'm not that conscientious enough to flush my brakes exactly every 2 yrs, but I try not to go much longer than that before I do it.

Bleeding ABS brakes is no different than what it always has been with non-ABS. Strictly speaking, there are small passages inside the ABS unit that doesn't get flushed, when you just bleed the 4 main circuits to each wheel. Some factory diagnostic software has provisions to tell the ABS controller to open up the ABS valves to bleed out those parts, while you are bleeding the main circuits. But... even without doing that, bleeding 99% of the old fluid out is still much better off than if you don't. And whenever you step on the brakes hard enough to trigger ABS, those valves will open up and the ABS pumps will run, even if just momentarily. Those "dead end" sections will get flushed out and replaced with relatively fresher brake fluid.
 

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2015 Sedona SX-L
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Brake service is easy, don’t listen to the naysayers that suggest this is some kind of rocket science. Just be careful and thorough and follow a guide/forum/YouTube if you’re not familiar with the process or if it’s your first time.

No you don’t have to bleed the brakes unless you opened the hydraulic circuit for some reason, which you won’t if you’re just replacing the usual wear items— pads & rotors.

That said, I like to bleed old fluid from the calipers whenever I change pads. That’s a simple bleed procedure (which was described above by another poster) done before you compress the caliper piston in to change your pads. It’s not a complete flush but it gives me some piece of mind that some new fluid is in the system, and the old heat-exposed fluid is removed from the calipers. If your brake fluid is older than 3-5 years you should consider a complete flush.

As mentioned above whenever you bleed, pay close attention to the master cylinder reservoir to ensure it has fluid in it— if it runs empty while you are bleeding you will introduce air into the system which requires a lot of effort to get back out.
 

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2017 Sedona LX+, 2019 Optima LX
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Did it to the Sedona about a year ago. It's very simple, just like every other car with a hydraulic brake system. Start at the pass rear, then the driv rear, pass front, drv front. It just tedious to do. I would suggest doing it every 2-3 years, or if you start feeling some spongy/wooden feel to the brakes. These vans weight more than 4500lbs unloaded, they can easily cook brake fluid. I would rec using some sort of synthetic fluid with a high boiling point, like valvoline synthetic (cheap enough on sale and readily available).
 
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