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Discussion Starter #1
I just had my 16 Sedona serviced today for oil change and tire rotation, and the guy at the local Hyundai dealership I used gave me a list of recommended maintenance items.

First and foremost, he said the battery is showing "increased resistance" and should be replaced. Is this common for a car of this age? My van has the factory battery and about 35k miles on it. The only thing I can think of is that it was a 2016 leftover new vehicle when I bought it summer of 2017, so it essentially sat in a lot for maybe 20 months with essentially no miles put on it, compared to maybe 10 months for your average new vehicle sold. Would that have degraded the battery to where it needs to be replaced after just three or four years (and only two years of regular driving)?

Oddly, my key fob battery keeps going out too. It gave its first low battery warning after just 11 months of ownership, and I've since then replaced it another times, and the warning light is on again! That's every 6 months. Maybe my cheap amazon marketplace button batteries are of poor quality and/or old? Once I run through them, maybe I'll put a new energizer/duracell button battery in and see how that does.

Anyone else run into poor battery life issues, either with the car battery or key fob? Thankfully I don't have that issue others are reporting where the battery just mysteriously drains while the car isn't even on.
 

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It's a sales tactic. They want to sell you a battery. I bought my Cadenza used, at a Nissan dealer, but brought it to my local Kia dealer for an inspection. The end result of the inspection: "Looks like you need a new battery, you have a weak cell. We can have one here for you overnight."

I took it back to the Nissan dealer and they did a thorough test on the battery and it showed nothing wrong. A year later and it has been completely fine.

What's really sad is that I paid just over $100 for the inspection, and they wanted another $100 for the battery. The must have thought I was an easy victim.

Every time I brought my Sedona in for the free oil changes: "Oh your cabin air filter is dirty. Looks like you need a new one."

They're trained to look for things that make them profit.
 

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Go to a local DIY auto parts place (A*Zone, Adv*Auto, O'R*y, etc). and ask them for an in-car battery test. They will come out with their tester and in a few minutes you can get a second opinion direct from their machine. It's not unreasonable/unheard of for a 3-4 yr old battery to go bad. There will be a date code stamped on the battery (it it's like my OEM one it will be 2 digit week followed by 2 digit year stamped into the plastic, but could be a sticker).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I will get a second opinion from Advanced Auto or similar place. I was dumb enough to buy the maintenance package from the dealer, which turned out to just be 10 oil change and rotations. This dealer is really close to my house, and this is my fifth appointment with them. Hadn't tried to upsell me on anything yet, so I was a bit surprised at his claims today. He also recommended their 30,000 mile $600 package which includes all sorts of things like brake fluid flush, coolant flush, he even brought up transmission fluid change!

As opposed to the user manual, which I checked and I couldn't believe this, doesn't recommend changing anything but oil and air/cabin filters during the first 100,000 miles. I don't even think it recommends coolant flush.

So you've got these dealer service people trying to change fluids early and the manufacturer going crazy with I guess "lifetime fluids." I guess the truth is somewhere in the middle.

I'm thinking transmission fluid at 60k, spark plugs at 90k, coolant flush and brake fluid flush at maybe 40k or 50k?
 

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These days with modern media, and tight competition, the manufacturers post their annual service costs, and the low numbers posted are achieved by things like "lifetime fluids" etc., and then you get the dealerships "advising" totally different service requirements and intervals to boost their income, and that works on most folks because they're not that familiar with the requirements and their legal position (they're not members here).

Use the owners manual as a guide and tell the dealership what you want, and let him know that you're only interested in what the manual states, or consider using a reputable independent place for routine maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I checked the owners manual again, and it only recommends coolant flush at 120,000 miles, and for some odd reason afterwards the coolant then needs to be flushed every 30,000 miles.

Transmission fluid is listed as "no check, no replace", so lifetime I guess, unless under "heavy driving conditions" in which case it becomes replace at 60k.

It keeps asking to inspect brake and power steering fluid, but nothing about flushing and replacing them.

It doesn't mention spark plugs basically at all.

All that seems overly optimistic to me. I think I'll play it in the middle and just do the spark plugs, transmission oil, and brake fluid all at 80k miles, and then at 160k miles if I still have the van at that time.

Anyways, off to advanced auto I go to see how the battery really is.
 

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Do yourself a favor and buy a battery load tester from Harbor freight. Costs $20 ($16 with 20% off coupon you can find everywhere). It will tell you in an instant whether your battery is still in good health. It is pretty much the same tool the auto parts stores use for their FREE test. Having one yourself means you can check periodically and spot issues before it causes other more expensive problems. Too many drivers continue to operate on batteries that are already getting weak. This puts a strain on the charging system and the batt can quit any time... usually in the middle of a road trip 1500 miles from home.

Depending on how the battery has been used and abused, 3-4 yrs is not all that uncommon. You say "only 2 yrs of regular driving"... does that mean it wasn't driven much or at all the other 1-1/2 to 2yrs? If so, that could cause more trouble for the battery than if it has been regularly driven and charged.

As for "heavy driving conditions"... that usually means how most of us drive... lots of short distances running errands, stop and go traffic, etc.
 

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Battery Tester/Analyzer seems like a good idea I should of done a long time ago. I counted and have 7 batteries (cars (3) , boat (1 set), toys (2))

One Example (digital)
 

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Regarding the key fob, I had the same issue with our 2015 Sedona. I was using cheap Harbor Freight batteries, and they would only last maybe a few weeks before I started seeing the “Low Battery” message. I switched to a good name-brand battery (Energizer?), and so far it’s been months with no problems.

I think our fobs are sensitive to battery brand.

Hope this helps...



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well I dropped by my local advanced auto, and their battery tester came back "good" with over 935 cold cranking amps. I don't think the machine they used showed anything about the internal resistance of the battery which the dealer claimed was the issue.

I think I'll just leave it. If it starts having issues starting this winter I'll go to Costco and get it a new battery. But I suspect it'll be fine for the next year or two.
 

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Day one of ownership of my Sorento had a bad FOB battery. Replaced batteries in both FOB's with name brand cells.

Not an easy job as the fob's have several parts that need to be in place before the final snap.
 

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Well I dropped by my local advanced auto, and their battery tester came back "good" with over 935 cold cranking amps. I don't think the machine they used showed anything about the internal resistance of the battery which the dealer claimed was the issue.

I think I'll just leave it. If it starts having issues starting this winter I'll go to Costco and get it a new battery. But I suspect it'll be fine for the next year or two.
AFAIK, there isn't a common tester that will measure internal resistance. You will see the symptoms of high internal resistance, which would be faster self discharge and excessively warm battery under load. Say... if you don't drive the car for a few days and don't put it on a charger, and your battery drains flat or shows low voltage, you know you have a weak battery with high internal resistance. The common parlance is that the battery "won't hold a charge." Typically, by the time the battery gets to that stage, the load test will show weak CCA also.

As for FOB battery... get a name brand lithium battery (Energizer, Duracell, etc.) and check the date on it too. I buy CR2032 in bulk from Amazon, since I have a whole bunch of other devices that use this popular coil cell. If you buy the individual packs at retail stores, they are awful expensive. I wouldn't bother with the Harborfreight variety. HF has some stuff that have acceptable quality; batteries... no.
 

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.... He also recommended their 30,000 mile $600 package which includes all sorts of things like brake fluid flush, coolant flush, he even brought up transmission fluid change!
That would be a part of the stealership wallet flush program, and will continue for as long as you continue to bring your vehicle to them for service.


..., or consider using a reputable independent place for routine maintenance .....
And this ^^^^ is how you put an end to it. A large percentage of owners are not even aware they can do this, and believe the stealership is the only option for maintaining their vehicle. I've actually read accounts from owners who had a service person lie to their face, telling them that taking it to an indy shop for service would void their warranty. For those who don't DIY, IMO a good, honest, independent shop will put an end to the ripoff. This of course applies across all makes, and is not limited to just Kia.
 

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Most OEM batteries tend to last 3-5 years. There seems to be a handful of Sedona's with battery drain issues, but if you have not encountered that with yours, its unlikely that you'll have a prematurely worn battery.

Don't believe some of the schedules, especially with "lifetime fluids". They may last, but replacement may be needed to ensure whatever system involved is working at peak efficiency.

For example, brake fluid is something that a lot of people don't change, but changing it every 2-4 years will ensure a nice, responsive brake pedal and reduce the feeling of fade. This is esp true with the Sedona as it is a fairly heavy vehicle, and usually is tasked with carrying hundreds of pounds of cargo/people. I changed the brake fluid on my 2017 recently and realize how wooden and unresponsive the brake pedal had gotten over time until I serviced the brake system.
 

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Looks like your battery turned out to be good and the dealership was just trying to make a buck.

However, I'll share a quick story. Back in 2001 I bought a brand new F150. I bought it near the end of the year when the 2002s were coming in so I got a good deal. The brand new battery on that brand new truck died within 1-2 months. The reason was that because I bought the truck late in the model year, the truck had basically been sitting unused in the lot and the battery had probably excessively discharged. On lead-acid batteries, everytime they get excessively discharged, there are permanent chemical changes that are damaging the battery internally.
 
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