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2012 Soul + automatic
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48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Usually I add air to the tires every month. If I can trust the tire air pressure sensor, maybe I can put air in the tires fewer times.

Are all four tires monitored with the sensors?

Are the sensors reliable?

What are the pros and cons of doing this?

Does anyone know if it a direct or indirect system?

What's the Difference?
DIRECT VS. INDIRECT

Direct Systems
attach a pressure sensor/transmitter to the vehicle’s wheels. An in-vehicle receiver warns the driver if the pressure in any tire falls below a predetermined level. Direct systems are typically more accurate and reliable and most are able to indicate which tire is underinflated.

Indirect Systems
use the vehicle’s antilock braking system’s wheel speed sensors to compare the rotational speed of one tire versus the others. If a tire is low on pressure, it will roll at a different number of revolutions per mile than the other three and alert the vehicle’s onboard computer. Indirect systems (except for the TPMS on several 2009+ Audi models and 2010+ Volkswagen models) are unable to generate accurate readings in cases where all four tires are losing pressure at the same rate, such as the effects of time and temperature.
 

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2020 Hyundai Palisades
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2,971 Posts
its direct and your quote tells you the difference and yes all the wheels have direct sensors if you have the owners manual look under TPMS
 

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10 Optima LX, 07 Rondo EX, 89 Chevy C1500
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1,411 Posts
There is a sensor inside each wheel, attached to the valve stem.

Yes, they are reliable. Failures do happen but are not frequent. Most sensor problems are caused by breakage when getting the tires changed from inexperienced, or ignorant, installers.

Pros: none. You should still check your tire pressure frequently to reduce uneven wear and possibly find problems/leaks before the pressure gets low enough to trigger the light. Low tire pressure also lowers fuel economy.

Cons: See above.
 

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Cerato S Hatch Auto
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1,236 Posts
TPMS is a Go/No Go system. Pressure needs to be about 20% low before triggering the alarm; (e.g. 25 PSI when it should be 32 PSI). That is, you still need to check the tyres yourself to keep them at the optimum pressure.

TPMS just saves you from dangerously low under-inflation. I once picked up a rental car (Non-TPMS) with some tyres at 10 PSI. I queried the company when returning the car and they shrugged it off: "It's the driver's problem; the tyres were OK when we serviced the car."
 

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2012 Soul + automatic
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48 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
TPMS is a Go/No Go system. Pressure needs to be about 20% low before triggering the alarm; (e.g. 25 PSI when it should be 32 PSI). That is, you still need to check the tyres yourself to keep them at the optimum pressure.

TPMS just saves you from dangerously low under-inflation. I once picked up a rental car (Non-TPMS) with some tyres at 10 PSI. I queried the company when returning the car and they shrugged it off: "It's the driver's problem; the tyres were OK when we serviced the car."
This is what I have been reading. It is too bad tpms could not indicate when air goes below the optimum pressure.
 
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