Kia Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've put the K&N filter in and was looking at the stock set up. Has anyone tried removing the air intake tube that runs across the front and picks up air on the other side of the engine? It seems useless to me since it's sucking hot air from next to the engine, why not reduce the restriction and remove it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I haven't had the time to yet but have read on a forum for our car about someone that did it to that and it improved the pick up. It basically would be like switching it to a short ram system because as far as I can see there is nothing that is jetting any cooler air to where the pick up is from the stock setup, unless they were thinking that the air running over the radiator would cool it some *shrugs*, even so, I don't think that slight change in temp would offset the gain from less restriction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I looked at mine yesterday and should receive my K & N Filter on the 19th. I will look into pulling off/modifying the air box tubing this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Originally posted by skpoppa@Feb 1 2005, 12:55 AM
I've put the K&N filter in and was looking at the stock set up. Has anyone tried removing the air intake tube that runs across the front and picks up air on the other side of the engine? It seems useless to me since it's sucking hot air from next to the engine, why not reduce the restriction and remove it.
You'll need to put an airhose on too.
Aka: a hose that goes from the front of the car, up to the airfilter (approx. 10cm's from the airfilter)
Have you found any pics on the internet of such a setup??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Hello folks,
Interesting sharing on K&N filter.

Can anyone help to explain the phenomenon of add more air will improve fuel economy? Theoretically, there is an ideal Air/Fuel Ratio for best combustion at the engine.

Please see the link from HOW STUFF WORKS.

http://auto.howstuffworks.com/question257.htm

Quote : "A gasoline engine burns gasoline in the presence of oxygen (see How Car Engines Work for complete details). It turns out that there is a particular ratio of air and gasoline that is "perfect," and that ratio is 14.7:1 (different fuels have different perfect ratios -- the ratio depends on the amount of hydrogen and carbon found in a given amount of fuel). If there is less air than this perfect ratio, then there will be fuel left over after combustion. This is called a rich mixture. Rich mixtures are bad because the unburned fuel creates pollution. If there is more air than this perfect ratio, then there is excess oxygen. This is called a lean mixture. A lean mixture tends to produce more nitrogen-oxide pollutants, and, in some cases, it can cause poor performance and even engine damage. " Unquote.

Best...unicc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Originally posted by unicc@Feb 18 2005, 04:45 AM

Quote : "A gasoline engine burns gasoline in the presence of oxygen (see How Car Engines Work for complete details). It turns out that there is a particular ratio of air and gasoline that is "perfect," and that ratio is 14.7:1 (different fuels have different perfect ratios -- the ratio depends on the amount of hydrogen and carbon found in a given amount of fuel). If there is less air than this perfect ratio, then there will be fuel left over after combustion. This is called a rich mixture. Rich mixtures are bad because the unburned fuel creates pollution. If there is more air than this perfect ratio, then there is excess oxygen. This is called a lean mixture. A lean mixture tends to produce more nitrogen-oxide pollutants, and, in some cases, it can cause poor performance and even engine damage. " Unquote.
And the reply I received from K & N technical dept...

Thank you for your interest in K&N products. For the most part the statement is accurate. Gas emits the least amount of pollutants and offers the best combustion in an air to fuel ratio of about 14.69 to 1 ratio. This is known as stoichiometric. The engine management system is designed to attempt to maintain fuel control using various sensors and switches.



Now, with an unrestricted intake system (better intake flow) will make the engine more efficient. Depending on ones driving style, there can be an increase in fuel mileage or a decrease.



Thank you,

Leon S. Collins

K&N Technical Support
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I took my tubing off this afternoon and will see how it runs as I take it out on the highway tomorrow. Really simple, two bolts and loosen the clamp to the air box. As for an air tube that will run up in front of it, I think I understand what you're talking about, but if you stop it just in front of the air box and dont connect it to your airbox, it would be fairly useless. The air that would come through that tube would be disbursed anywhere into the engine. Now you can rig up a pipe to hook directly to your airbox and place it down so it will pick up cold air or run it to the front, then you would get the cooler air you are talking about. I've never seen anything on the internet for a Sedona though so you would have to make it, although I have seen something on Ebay for a Sorento and Sedona, but who knows if it actually fits.

My point, without going into any extra work, if you look at the stock intake, the pickup is on the passenger side of the van up high right past the radiator and is basically sitting right next to the hot engine, and is essentially picking up hot air. The air has to travel through 3 90 degree angles in order to get to the airbox. If you look at where the the intake tub hits the box, there is really no difference as to where it would pick up air if you removed it as compared to where the hose picks it up. In reality, you would be picking up air that is a little lower, since that sits lower, and everyone knows, hot air rises, so it would actually probably be a slight bit cooler and cold air makes for a cleaner burn. By removing the tubing, you are removing restriction, therefore freeing up power and at normal driving conditions, you should also experience improved fuel economy. Now as the K&N was saying, it depends on the driving condition. Normal driving you will notice better fuel economy, but when you punch it, you'll notice more power. Basically by removing the intake, you have a short ram intake like you see on some cars, but they just have a cone filter and a short pipe directly under the hood.

If you want to really improve things, rig up a pipe to hook onto your box and have it going down to pick up air from the lowest point possible or route it someway to the grill (though it doesn't look like there is any room that way), or get a hood scoop and route it that way.

The only thing that air intake tube is good for is quieting your engine some, about the same as the two resonators they put on your exhaust. Remove those and you'll also see better mileage and horsepower when you tromp it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Just another thought on the air mixture topic. All new cars have MAFS, temp sensors, etc that monitor the amount of air, etc and send that info to the ECU so it will adjust the fuel to keep it at the optimal level, and as we all know most vehicles are made as a compromise to fuel economy and HP. The point of items like K&N and air intakes is to free up restriction. An engine has to **** air in, and push exhaust out. The more restriction on either end, the more power and fuel you have to use just to move the air. Someone stated before and engine is just a big air pump, which it is. Here is where the driving condition comes into play. Normal driving while freeing up restriction, uses less power and less fuel, the engine doesn't have to work as hard to get the air or move it out. Now when you tromp it, you have a whole lot more air coming in, so you will use more fuel, but you're getting more power. If you can get more cold air in, you get better combustion because cold air is more condensed. Putting in the filter allows more air to pass in, but removing the air tube, just removes the restriction, that same amount of air will come in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Ok I had to laugh when I saw my last post, it **** out s-u-c-k..lol. I didn't realize that was a dirty word. Anyway, here is the report after removing that. Can notice a little more low end torque and better throttle response. When you have to tromp on it, you will notice a little more aggressive engine sound. Now on my previous fill up before I had the K&N and removed that intake tube, I averaged 13 mpg. I know it sucks but I only have 1800 miles on it so far so it's not broke in and I do mostly city driving. Makes me miss my little Mazda Mx-3, but that isn't good at hauling around kids. This time around I was just at 16 mpg, which is what the sticker says it is supposed to get for City, which is much better. I also changed the oil from that time to this, plus I didn't have to have it warming up like I did a couple times during the last fill up, but there was definatly a fuel improvement.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top