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From what I have heard people havnt really noticed any difference with a K&N drop in, in their Optima performance wise.
Im sure it will make it run a little better though might even get better gas milage. Im still debating if I want to make my own cold air intake or put a K&N drop in in my Optima.
 

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If you want more HP then you need to go with an CAI, and K&N makes good CAI's. The Drop in filter gives you longevity (1,000,000 Miles). You can't beat that! LOL. I'm also debating on getting a CAI for the Optima. :57:
 

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Did you look into doing the CAI for your optima? I have an '05 EX V6 but K&N doesn't make a CAI for my car according to their site. Know of another model that would fit?
 

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Originally posted by apollo46@Aug 26 2005, 10:00 AM
Did you look into doing the CAI for your optima? I have an '05 EX V6 but K&N doesn't make a CAI for my car according to their site. Know of another model that would fit?
Look this is what I've found on another site.

it depends, in a world like this, nothing is cut and dry. Let me explain the differences between teh Short ram and CAI and their power improvements.

CAI Pros:
-gets cooler air into you engine (cooler air is denser which means a bigger explosion)
-High end power gain
-slightly better upper midrange gain then shirt ram
-nice deep throaty intake sound (makes your car sound meaner)
-lighter weight then stock airbox/pipes/hoses etc.
-makes your car engine bay look like it has more room
-gives it a nice modified look
-much better throttle responce

Gain: 8-20HP depeding on application pipe bends, filter placement and condition of engine

CAI cons:
less low power/torque gain
-slightly less lower midrange gain
-too many bends*
-higher chance of hydrolock
-not a good idea in extremely cold weather
-bigger chance of something coming loose or making noise cause of interia.

*= Air is like water and electricity, it takes the path of least resistance, the more bends, the less velocity and the more power you lose.

other then that, the CAI is the best NA mod for air intakes.

SRI Pros:
-lighter then stock intake
-lighter then CAI (less piping)
-less of a chance of something wiggling off form inertia
-safer to operate in extremely cold weather
-safer in rainy and winter seasons
-slightly louder then CAI (if you think its a plus)
-greater Low end gain
-slightly better lower midrange gain
-much better throttle responce

SRI cons:
-not as good in teh higher range or higher mid range of the power spectrum as CAI
-air volume is not as dense (they call it a hot air intake for a reason, its in the engine bay)
-slightly louder then CAI (if you think its a CON)
-takes up slightly more room in the engine bay (cause of filter and spacing around it for adiquate air supply)

gains: between 4 to 10 depending on application, where the filter is located, the charge of the air (very important for any potential gains).

metal piping: things to know.
its lighter then the stock rubber piping but should be wrapped up with heat tape to help prevent heatsoak. It may need to be shielded from heat to be much more effective. The stock rubber hose resists heatsoak more then the light aluminum hosing does.

The filter should have a heatshield, some have a special plastic heatshield (like my Weapon R intake filter) while others have a metal heatshield (some K&N filters) I had a previous K&N filter but it was adding more weight then the weapon R plus didn;t look as good (and didn't go with my engine color theme). I also got better gains out of my setup and engine from the smaller weapon R filter and heatshield (you may not get the same thing, so if yours is tunning really good, then stick with it.)

when it comes to intakes, it really matters how you set it up, it makes a difference if you take your time and put in the best quality you can afford to. For example:

to make a quality intake do the following only when applicable:
-wrap up the metal piping for less heatsoak and cooler air charge inside the piping.
-if a SRI then either mount a heatshield or put a heat dam around the filter to keep the engine heat away from the filter.
-make the piping as strait as possible (my SRI is completely strait).
-have some cooler air blowing into the engine compartment, be creative but be careful.
-have the least amount of bends when bends are necessary.
-have the smoothest transitions from bigger to smaller to keep velocity optimum
-place the MAF within 6 inches to 12 for optimal and stable readings, leave the MAF screen in.

there is more but its late. Hope that helps

if you do it right, you will get a bigger bang and more smiles per miles. I couldn't be happy enough with my SRI.

Written by: Night-Hawk (streetkiaz)
 
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