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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My ac compressor/clutch went bad a year ago. I finally replaced it and the drier, only to find that it wont turn on. I can't find any low pressure switch. I bought the manual, but it says that the switch is on the drier which it is not. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

2007 sportage 2wd
 

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2008 SpectraSX, 2014 Optima LX,2006 Jeep Liberty, Linux Mint Mate
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Did "you" replace them or did you have them replaced?

Not knowing you and your abilities I would also say that the compressor's magnetic clutch will not engage unless there is at least some freon in the system....so a missing pressure switch would also create the problem.

You can inject +12v from the battery through a 15A inline fuse to the connections on the compressor's clutch to force the compressor to spin.

One of the two wires going to the clutch is a ground wire and will read 0 ohms resistance compared to the car battery's negative the other will read high resistance.
The one with the high resistance is the one to inject (connect) the +12v to... If you make a mistake and connect to the ground wire the 15A fuse will just blow.

Is there freon (R134A) in the system? Has a vacuum been pulled? I ask because I do not know.

I see you are in the Philadelphia area so I know it's a USA model .I'll look at kiatechinfo for info on switch....

The "triple pressure switch" is located on the passenger side, near the condenser.
Three functions
1 Low pressure (not enough freon)
2 High pressure (if the system's freon pressure is too high/over charged)
3 Medium pressure (it turns both the radiator and the condenser fans on HIGH)

It's in the same location on both the 2.0L and the 2.6L engine models
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I replaced them myself, and no I am not a mechanic, and have never aspired to be until Pepboys told me $1500. I did have a manual though!

There is very little freon in the system as the clutch wont engage, but I tried to put some in it just to get it started.

I think I found the "switch", although I don't know what to do with it. I see the wires going into the low pressure line. Ok now what!?!?

I like the idea of injecting the 12v, I just don't know if I can do that or not.
 

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2008 SpectraSX, 2014 Optima LX,2006 Jeep Liberty, Linux Mint Mate
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Ok Chuck...
I'll take you through what you will need to get the system running...

First.... Because the system uses R134A refrigerant (and not the old R12) you can't just "add" freon... The R134A will react with the moisture in the system and you WILL have lots of failures. The system needs to be "pulled" to a near "perfect" vacuum. That removes the moisture and the atmospheric "air". The new dryer you installed has silica beads that attracts any left over moisture in the system. After the system has been "purged" of moisture and "air".....THEN you can add the R134A back into the system.
OK now the question...."How do I "Pull/Purge" the system??" You need to attach a device to the same couplings that you tried to add the freon at. They do make vacuum pumps and they are available at Harbor Freight and go for around $105. There is also a venturi system that uses compressed air that moves by a "venturi" creating a vacuum that comes close to a "very good" but not perfect vacuum. That device is under $20 and requires an air compressor that can continuously supply 4.2CFM (cubic feet per minute)...also available from Harbor Freight (on line).

The amount of freon/R134a your AC system requires is on a label under the hood and is measured in OZ (ounces)... Usually two cans (@12OZ per can) is more than enough as usually the full charge amount is around 19~21OZ.

The system will also require some AC oil to be injected into the system to "oil" the new Compressor/Clutch...

It seams like a lot of "hassle" but if it's not done close to correct you have wasted your money on freon (3 cans) and have a system that won't last too long because of the acid created from the freon reacting with the moisture in the system...

You are probably better off taking the car to a place that specializes in car AC systems.
Call around and explain you replaced the Compressor and Dryer and need the system purged and filled with R134a....See what price they offer and check the next place for the same... If you installed the dryer and have kept a closed (not open to the outside air) system both of those items are still OK and you will not need anything else replaced BUT pulling a vacuum and installing the proper amount of freon. Don't let them sell you anything more.
You have done all the "grunt" work and the system is ready to be charged.
Do a search on Google for pulling a vacuum and recharging a car AC system...Lots of YouTube videos on it.
Dave
p.s.
You will have beaten the system and the $1500 charge...You just don't have the right equipment to finish the job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, I followed your advice and took it to a shop. It has been vacuumed and charged. The clutch still wouldn't engage until he jumped it the way you said to. When he took the jumper off the clutch turned off. So he checked the fuses and sure enough the ac fuse was blown. He replaced it and the ac worked great. I drove the car to my wifes work and it was cold the whole time. 3 hours later when she drove home the clutch wouldn't engage again. Fuse is not blown, I have no clue what to do!
 

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2007 Kia Sorento 3.8 Automatic
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I need everyone struggling with this situation of no A/C clutch engagement to consider something very carefully.
My adventure was perplexing, but I was not about to give up easily.
I'll skip past the details of where this problem led me and get right to the important part.

Diagnosis 101 says: Always check your basics first! (Before you start traveling down rabbit holes in despair and over-thinking things, "Basics" is always the best place to start).
Assumptions: Don't make them!!........ Test, Confirm and verify. Follow procedure, don't skip steps. Follow logical order.
When chasing a problem, it's always best to start at the end of a circuit and work your way back.

An example would be if your tail light was out, it would be best to start at the bulb, then the socket, the ground, the fuse, the switch, etc.

In the case of the A/C compressor clutch, the very end of the circuit is the compressor clutch itself.
I point this out because it needs to be tested and confirmed regardless of whether or not power is being sent from the relay.

If you find no power at the compressor, test the compressor clutch directly.
Apply voltage directly to the compressor clutch.
If it works, the problem is the supply wire, if it doesn't work it's a bad compressor clutch.

But understand, you could have both!
Consider a bad compressor and an open circuit like a blown fuse. You would have neither power present or action from the clutch.

I was really curious when I couldn't get my confirmed good compressor to engage when the under-hood relay was jumped.

So, I traced the red compressor wire back toward the relay in the under-hood fuse box and low and behold I found the problem.

There's a connector on the red wire where it joins the vehicles main conduit behind and below the driver side headlamp assembly.


The connector was separated.
And I know exactly how it happened!

The vehicle had an alternator failure just days earlier and I didn't remove the battery tray completely when replacing the alternator. So I ended up wrangling with the tray and the alternator when attempting to remove and subsequently re-install the alternator. This wrangling of the battery tray is what caused the connector by the headlight assembly to come apart.

The red wire I traced back to this connector is tethered to the battery tray. (It is tape wrapped with another cable). It runs up from the A/C Compressor below, through a conduit, is tethered to the bottom of the battery tray and eventually travels around the bottom of the tray to a connector directly behind & below the driver side headlight assembly.

It's a quick basic visual check and may just be 'your' open circuit and the solution to your problem.

The vehicle I was working on was a 2007 Kia Sorento 6 cylinder.

Good Luck All! I hope this helps someone!
 
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