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Considering 2020 Sportage SX Turbo AWD
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all. First post here and wanted to know what folks have paid or have been offered on their Sportage.

Full Disclosure: Don't know much about the Kia brand besides driving a few rentals, but expanding my search outside the normal Honda, Toyota, Nissan choices.
I admit that I've owned a lot of Honda's and a little bias/loyal to the brand.

Thanks in advance.
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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Paid 34,200 for a 2020 SX AWD.

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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375 Posts
Thanks! How do you like your SX Turbo?
Not sure which I like more my SX or my wife (just kidding). I do like the SX!!! I handles great, launches hard for a small SUV, and is loaded with tech. I had a 2017 SX and traded it for the 2020 (like the myriad of small improvements that have been made).

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2020 Kia Sportage SX Turbo AWD
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1 Posts
$34,450
Steel grey, beige/black 2 tone interior.

Front end of the 2020 looks so much better than previous years IMO. Just hit 2k miles last week. No regrets at all, no issues other than driver side mirror randomly started to continuously run for 5/6 seconds after turning off the car

Kia dealership said it was caused by someone manually trying to close the side mirror
 

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Considering 2020 Sportage SX Turbo AWD
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I got offered $30,800 and 60 mos @ 0% financing.

Tax, tags, doc fee not included on that price.
 

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Considering 2020 Sportage SX Turbo AWD
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Where are you located? I've never seen a dealer go that low on an SX priced at over 35,000.
Omaha, Nebraska
Dealer name is H&H Kia

The price is even lower if you're trading a vehicle, which I'm not.

CORRECTION: I guess the 0% wasn't part of that deal, as I tried to see if I can close this deal today.
 

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2017 AWD Sportage SX Black Cherry/Beige
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303 Posts
Doc fees..... Those F'ing BS costs. Mine back way in 2016 for my 2017 SX was $599... now I see they are $699 for a 2020! here in the land of Bernie... Grrr!
 

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Considering 2020 Sportage SX Turbo AWD
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Discussion Starter #12
Doc fees..... Those F'ing BS costs. Mine back way in 2016 for my 2017 SX was $599... now I see they are $699 for a 2020! here in the land of Bernie... Grrr!
What I don't get is...some dealers have a $99 doc fee and $17 titling fee, and others bundle it and charge you an arm and a leg. SMH
 

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2017 Kia Sportage
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What I don't get is...some dealers have a $99 doc fee and $17 titling fee, and others bundle it and charge you an arm and a leg. SMH
Doc fees are generally competitive by state. Some states like California have limits on doc fees. But the truth is that doc fees are just a way to add profits to the bottom line. Most dealers really don't make much money on the final prices so "doc fees" are necessary if they want to make any money. Dealers also make money on volume rebates from the manufacturers. If they included doc fees in their negotiated prices with customers, they couldn't advertise a competitive price. Normally, if you deal hard on a car that is not in limited supply, they will bring down the price but not the doc fee which other dealers will eventually find out and then all dealers lose. So I recommend not arguing with dealers on the doc fee -- just argue on the out-of-the-door total price and let them do the manipulation. After all, the only thing that counts to you is how much you end up paying. Now there are add-ons that are worthless like nitrogen in the tires. If you accept that one, you need to see a shrink....
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX Turbo FWD
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I bought a 2020 SX FWD, hyper red with gray interior. Paid $33,430 out the door 2 days ago. All taxes, doc fees, rebates, discounts, dealer markups (door edge, pin striping, other worthless profit makers, etc.) included, no trade-in. I could have saved even more on a gray color SX at another dealer but wanted hyper red.

I looked at a lot of brands/models and the SX offers the most for the money IMO. Mazda CX-5 interior more plush, but have to buy AWD to get the turbo (5K more min.). Tucson discontinued turbo so it was out. RAV 4 has a nice interior, not crazy about the look, not worth paying 5 or 6 K more though. CRV, CVT transmission, nope. Kia SX gas mileage less than the other brands, but you have to burn a lot of gas to make up for the difference in price. THE SX holds it own with the luxury brands too.

Negotiated online, email, and phone with 10 dealers. Only 3 committed to written offers out the door. The others promised the lowest price if I would only drive to their dealership (a 6 hour drive in some cases). Don't over pay. Do some research to get the sales tax, registration fees for your area, rebates may be taxable too. Look at the small print, most dealers are adding $800 or $900 in extra dealer profit ( pre-delivery fee or some other BS they will call it), plus $1500 to $2000 in extra accessories like pin stripes, nitrogen or car washes. Your $37,000 MSRP is more likely to be around $40,000 plus a couple of thousand more for taxes and registration, etc. depending on where you live. Don't pay attention to advertised prices or online prices. It's all going to end up similar to what I have described.

Before you start looking for a car, you have to know how much of a monthly payment you can afford (and know your credit score) unless paying cash. Use an online auto calculator to see different payment options. The purchase price is based on the out the door price. Using the above for example, you bargain about $42,000 down to around $34,000. You have $10,000 trade-in or cash to put down so your loan amount will be $24,000. With excellent credit you shouldn't have to pay no more than 3% to 4% (60 months or less). At 3% your payment will be about $421. I don't recommend going beyond 60 months to lower monthly payments. You really can't afford the car if you have to do that. You have to either put more down or buy a lower price model. Now that you know how much you can afford and how much a new car will actually cost... find the model that fits financially.

If possible, don't trade-in your old car. If you have to trade-in, know what it's worth to a dealer and factor that in when deciding how much you can afford. The dealer doesn't need to know about this though. If they ask about a trade-in, say probably not. You want to get the best price first. You can ask them to see how much their used car manager will buy your old car for later. Knowledge is power. The dealer will assume you haven't done your homework. That's OK... use it to your advantage.

Never discuss payments when negotiating (keep in mind the maximum amount you can afford for a new car). You are trying to get the best out the door price... period. Be up front about that because that's what the car is actually going to cost whether paying cash or financing. If you arrive at a price that you're satisfied with then you can discuss payment with their finance manager. If not walk away. Start again with another dealer. You have even more power now with the what you should have learned from the first dealer. You can negotiate all of this without ever going into a dealership. Have the dealer e-mail you their offer showing all associated costs (out the door price). If they won't do that move on. Chances of them honoring any verbal commitment is pretty slim.

Know your credit score before you begin. With excellent credit (700 score or more), you shouldn't pay more than 3% interest with Kia financing unless you extend out 6 or 7 years. With 0% financing the car will cost more as it's in lieu of a discount.

The finance dept. is a huge profit center for the dealership and the manager usually makes a big commission on the add-on items he will try to sell you. DON'T buy any of them no matter how enticing. By now, if you did the research and stuck to your guns, you should be within $2 or $3 of the monthly payment you expected to pay before you started.

Bottom line is don't buy a car until you get the price you're satisfied with and a payment you can afford. Unfortunately, that may mean having to go with a lower priced trim or different model all together. Don't assume you can make a higher payment because you may get a raise or work is expanding, etc. Plan on the unexpected and worst case scenario. If everything goes to plan you can buy a more expensive car next time.
 

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Am I understanding that in some states or countries, the DEALER collects registration and taxes? I’m in Oklahoma and the only thing we pay the dealer for is the cost of the car. The negotiated price is the out the door cost. The tag, tax, and registration fees are paid directly to the state after you receive the title. I find it hard to compare prices in this thread if you guys are including all that as they can vary greatly by location and they are just a pass-thru with the dealer so why include them when talking about price?
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX Turbo FWD
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Yes, in some states the dealer does collect the tag, sales tax, and registration fees (and also tries to make a tidy profit for doing so). In any case, a buyer needs to know how much those fees add up to as this will be included in the total cost of the vehicle to them.

Good point about why including these fees. Unless you were buying in the same local, your price could be quite a bit different than someone in another state where taxes and fees could be higher or lower. Sales tax alone is 6% in Florida.
 

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2017 Sportage LX
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52 Posts
I wonder how many states do what they do up here in Alaska and give you permanent plates for your car at age 65. No sales tax either.
 
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