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99 Kia Elan 1.8L, 17 Ford Edge Sport 2.7L V6, 15 Mustang 3.7L V6, 08 Harley Nightrain
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FWIW, that's less than half what your tranny holds. 2.4 and 3.3 are different, but hold 7.5 and 8.24 quarts, respectively. Check page 8-7 of your owner's manual.
My car holds a similar amount and I used 11 qts to do multiple drain and fills until the fluid being drained looked good.
 

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2016 Sorento EX V6 AWD FE (w/ EX Premium Package) & 2020 Soul EX (w/ EX Designer Collection Package)
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Thanks to corona slowdown on everything, I finally got around to changing the ATF in my '19 Sorento EX at 37,500 I did it the same time as oil/filter change when I already had the belly pan off the engine compartment. The filler plug is a little black plastic rascal that is in there pretty deep on the top of the transmission. it has a 3/8" drive square hole in the top. I used all the 3/8" extensions I had to get long enough to reach it and it broke loose easily. I smeared some grease on the end of the extension and the plug stuck to the grease and came out with the tool.
The drain plug is 23 mm and broke loose pretty easily. I captured the fluid in a clean tub. I measured it and it was 3.5 qts. I cleaned the magnet and replaced the drain plug.
I used a long 'ATF funnel' which barely fit in the fill hole and poured 3.5 qts back in the tranny, I made the mistake of pouring the fluid in too quickly and some spilled down the side and dripped in the floor. Next time I'll know to go more slowly.
I stuck the fill plug back on the extension with grease to hold it in place so I could lower it back down to the hole. the grease held it just fine.

the drain plug is magnetic and was covered with about 1/4" of metal particle fuzz. the Fluid was disgusting. It was brown with a maroon tint and smelled bad. I feel changing the fluid was a good idea and am confident in this method to exchange part of the fluid. It was so easy that I plan on doing it again in 10-12000 mikes to get more new fluid worked in. I did this with the front wheels on ramps. I don't know if the vehicle would have been level if the volume of fluid would be different.
You can go 100K with the scheduled maintenance if you want to but this fluid seemed seriously compromised at 37,500 to me. I'd be curious to see an oil analysis report on it's condition. Its a relatively easy and cheap thing to do in the interest of keeping the tranny alive and healthy. I used Phillips 66 VersaTrans LV ATF .
I’ve been changed ATF on my family’s Hyundai/Kia vehicles (2011 Sonata 2.0T Limited, 2011 Tucson Limited, 2013 Elantra GT, and 2016 Sorento EX V6 AWD). All have 6 speed AT (I believe the 8 speed AT is similar to 6 speed AT).

My ATF change method on all those vehicles is drain and fill [I measure the drained ATF and filled the same amount through the ATF Injection hole (eyebolt)]. When I put my 2016 Sorento EX V6 up on a ramp, the front wheels, it’s usually 4 quarts. Recently I put my Sorento up on four jack stands (leveled) and this time drained 4 quarts and 500ml. And checked the ATF level using the manufacturer’s Fluid Service Adjustment Procedure. After I did this procedure, I learned my previous ‘drain and fill’ gave me spot on ATF level.

I hope it helps.
 

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2019 Kia Sorento LX 3.3L GDI V6 - FWD (Sparkling Silver)
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If you really believe that it's possible for the transmission fluid to be incorrectly filled coming out of the factory, then you should have done a level check before ever driving the vehicle. Did you do that? Does anyone do that? How many reports have you read of Kia/Hyundai transmissions failing, due to being incorrectly filled at the factory?

I refill the exact same amount without ever doing the idiotic level check procedure, and have never lost a minute of sleep about doing it that way. My vehicle, my choice. Your vehicle, your choice.
I appreciate your passion about the subject. That being said. No, we don't do a fluid check on a closed transmission system straight out of the lot, but if it still had a dip stick, you bet I would.

As for the engine oil, my specific car sat on the dealer's lot almost a year before I picked it up. I tried to do oil level check but it always seemed low, so I did do my own oil change right away with full synthetic. The dealer assured me the levels were right, but come on, i tried checking that oil level 20 times on the dip stick and the oil barely shows where the L is.. am I to trust what the dealer said and keep driving? No

As for the transmission, let me ask you this. If you did a regular engine oil change at home and removed 4.5 qts, knowing your vehicle takes just below 7. Do you add only 4.5 qts because KIA knows best? Or do you continue to check the oil level until you know you have the right amount of fluid?

Look, we're not arguing here. The fact of the matter is that you just don't add what you drained and hope all goes well. There are many reasons why the level could be off, and without knowing exactly where that level is it's impossible to be sure.

Yes, you're absolutely right. Your car your choice.. I'd never tell you otherwise. But we both have to agree to disagree on how proper maintenance should be done.

I hope you and your loved ones are safe during these difficult times. This stay at home crap is keeping us all on edge.

Cheers
 

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99 Kia Elan 1.8L, 17 Ford Edge Sport 2.7L V6, 15 Mustang 3.7L V6, 08 Harley Nightrain
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There was a post here recently where the transmission was found to be under-filled from the factory and the member got a new warranty replacement installed - I would check the level.
Found that post - thread title made a normal search impossible (now corrected)

Turns out it only had half the amount of transmission fluid in the transmission
 

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2019 Kia Sorento LX 3.3L GDI V6 - FWD (Sparkling Silver)
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Found that post - thread title made a normal search impossible (now corrected)

Thank YOU for sharing Ron,

These assembly lines are never perfect, mistakes happen, if we can do our part to make sure the car has what it needs to serve us well I think these things will last hundreds of thousands of miles.

Thank you again sir.
 

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2011 Forte SX 2.4L (thankfully MPI) A/T 144K miles
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Kia Rio 2013 auto
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Take some pictures above and underneath your transmission, and we can probably point them out to you. I have a 2016, so I can't verify with pics. I can just say that on mine, the drain plug is a large 24mm hex bolt that's on the bottom of the transmission (it's pretty obvious which one it is when you get underneath and look at it). The drain plug head on mine is painted black. The fill plug is a plastic hex head that can be removed with a 3/8" socket extension (or a hex socket if you have one large enough.

If you saw a video of someone doing a flush (by disconnecting the transmission cooler lines), I would avoid doing that if you're new at this. Just do a drain-and-fill, drive for a short distance, then repeat that process 2 more times.

The system takes somewhere between 7 and 8 quarts total, but only about 4-5 quarts drain out. That's why it's good to drain it 3 times.. that gets most of the old fluid out. Don't measure what comes out, because you actually don't know if the correct amount is in there right now. Just fill it until fluid starts coming out the level-check hole (which is on the front side of the transmission.. it's a separate plastic plug that you need to remove.. again with a 3/8" socket extension). When you see it flow out the level-check hole, start the car and shift slowly through all the gears a couple times. That should draw more fluid inside so it will stop flowing out the level check hole. After doing that, fill it slowly with more fluid until it starts slowly flowing out the level check hole once again. Then you're done. That's how you know for sure that it's filled to the right level.

I will say my 2016's transmission fluid was very very dark (almost black) at 30-35k when I first looked at it. So I do think on Kias, this is something worth checking at 30k, even though it seems very early on in the car's life. But I had lots of metal powder built up by 35k, and it hasn't built back up since doing regular drain-and-fills. These transmission can potentially last over 100k without ever touching them, but if you want to keep the car longer than that, I think it's worth the risk of removing a couple of drain & fill plugs.

Also one tip: when you first remove the drain plug, measure the crush washer's diameter so you can buy another one for when you drain it again in the future. I've re-used mine about 5 times with no issue, but you really should have a backup on-hand. I need to get one myself. Good luck.
That's pretty much word for word what the book says on other kias. Of course like stated above it is called "lifetime" and that process is how to fill the trans fluid after and axle / radiator removal. On a 205 forte sx (1.6-t) w/ ~25k/mi the trans fluuid was obviously dark and contaminated with debris (black material). I assume this is from the "break in period" and I can see no harm that would be caused by flushing them out "using oem fluids and seals, at oem levels" as the book would recommend.
 

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2017 Sorento SXL
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I did ATF drain and fill in both of my sorentos. one was at 30k miles another one was at 40k miles. it made a difference in both.
 
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