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2017 sportage LX 2.4l AWD w/ 4 low option
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Discussion Starter #1
Having issues with the 4wd in my sportage when driving up a steep incline gravel driveway.
As soon as one wheel slips the vehicle completely stops accelerating no matter how far I push the pedal it will not move and starts to roll backward. The engine does not stall nor does it throw any trouble lights, it just becomes completely unresponsive.
This happens with 4 low engaged and without. Has anyone else experienced this issue?
 

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2018 Sportage LX AWD
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Having issues with the 4wd in my sportage when driving up a steep incline gravel driveway.
As soon as one wheel slips the vehicle completely stops accelerating no matter how far I push the pedal it will not move and starts to roll backward. The engine does not stall nor does it throw any trouble lights, it just becomes completely unresponsive.
This happens with 4 low engaged and without. Has anyone else experienced this issue?
I have a 2018 Sportage LX and to me that is normal operation of any vehicle with Electronic Stability Control (ESC). Refer to attached pages from owners manual. The ESC basically works by not allowing your wheels to spin and does this in two ways. It limits the engine revolutions and also apply the brakes. To allow the revs to go up press the ESC button on the dash to the left of steering wheel. To also disengage the vehicle from applying the brakes, press the same ESC button and hold it for about 3 to 4 seconds. This applies to when you're stuck in mud or snow also.
 

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2017 sportage LX 2.4l AWD w/ 4 low option
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Discussion Starter #3
That makes sense. I will give that a try next time. Thanks for the information.
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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368 Posts
I know it may not make sense to many, but I turn my ESC off in the winter as I have come close to being hit while attempting to pull out to cross a snow covered road, or make a turn (due to ESC "preventing" slip).

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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I've only experienced this when using too much gas pedal. In severe starts I use second gear and very little gas and have no problems here
in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.
 

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2017 Sportage LX
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I turn my ESC off when I think I'm going to need extra grip but on the main road traveling at driving speeds I would never want the ESC turned off as the stability control works fantastic in these cars, especially when making emergency maneuvers on ice.
 

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There is no '4 low' - its 4WD lock, which defaults to AWD over 25 mph - the car does not have a low range transfer case - it would use the regular speeds in the auto trans unless you were using the manual gear control at the time, but gear selection would be as usual.
I have experienced the 'traction control' dilemma in a 2WD van. I never had that before and didn't realize what was happening, but I had approached a stop sign where the side road I was on had an upward slope to the highway, and it was snowing. When I had a chance to go, the damn thing wouldn't. It was slipping so the 'traction control' was braking the spinning wheel. Because of this delay in being able to drive away from the stop, the van was very slightly struck by a car that lost control trying to turn right onto the road I was on.
With the AWD Sportage, I have not experienced anything like that. If I did, I would view it as a malfunction since it totally negates the AWD. In reviewing the 'Dynamax' AWD system information available on You Tube I am not finding any mention of it doing this and we have had mild winters with little snow since I got the AWD so I haven't had a chance to play with it in the snow.
KIA ads on TV, like for the Telluride, definitely show it blasting through mud and slush with multiple wheels spinning.
I don't know but it sounds to me like there was some kind of failure in your AWD in getting up the gravel drive, which is the exact circumstance when you needed that rear drive to help move the car.
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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There is no '4 low' - its 4WD lock, which defaults to AWD over 25 mph - the car does not have a low range transfer case - it would use the regular speeds in the auto trans unless you were using the manual gear control at the time, but gear selection would be as usual.
I have experienced the 'traction control' dilemma in a 2WD van. I never had that before and didn't realize what was happening, but I had approached a stop sign where the side road I was on had an upward slope to the highway, and it was snowing. When I had a chance to go, the damn thing wouldn't. It was slipping so the 'traction control' was braking the spinning wheel. Because of this delay in being able to drive away from the stop, the van was very slightly struck by a car that lost control trying to turn right onto the road I was on.
With the AWD Sportage, I have not experienced anything like that. If I did, I would view it as a malfunction since it totally negates the AWD. In reviewing the 'Dynamax' AWD system information available on You Tube I am not finding any mention of it doing this and we have had mild winters with little snow since I got the AWD so I haven't had a chance to play with it in the snow.
KIA ads on TV, like for the Telluride, definitely show it blasting through mud and slush with multiple wheels spinning.
I don't know but it sounds to me like there was some kind of failure in your AWD in getting up the gravel drive, which is the exact circumstance when you needed that rear drive to help move the car.
The real flaw in the AWD system on the Sportage is that where it is capable of transferring power from front to rear (when sensing slippage in the front), it does not have the capability to transfer drive from rear right to rear left (or vice versa) when both the front tires are slipping and one rear is also slipping.

In addition, when TC is turned on it applies the brakes to the slipping wheel(s). Turning it off allows the slipping wheels to have additional power applied (which may be the only way out in the situation noted above).

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Dynamax can drive any wheel because it has TC on both front and rear axles. I'll have to play with mine in some slippery place other than snow, because it looks like we're not getting any before warm weather.
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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Dynamax can drive any wheel because it has TC on both front and rear axles. I'll have to play with mine in some slippery place other than snow, because it looks like we're not getting any before warm weather.
TC works by applying the brakes to the slipping wheel. It has nothing to do with the application of power to a wheel. There is no limited slip differential in the rear of the Sportage, so there is really only one driven tire at any time. In the attached video link notice the response of the driver's side rear wheel when both front tires and the passenger rear tire are allowed to slip (car no go).

 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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There might be just a bit of confusion due to the addition of traction control, which applies the brake to the slipping wheel to shuttle torque to the opposite wheel with traction. And come to think of it if traction control is active while in AWD mode that Magna produced rear clutch pack in front of the differential may be under stresses not designed for or considered. We may never know......
 

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2020 Kia Sportage SX AWD and 1988 Mercedes 300CE
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True torque vectoring (adjusting the application of power to each of the four wheels can only happen with a central transfer case (moving power front to back as needed), and limited slip differentials both front and rear (moving power fom one side to the other).

The transfer case we do have, and it appears from the video that we may have limited slip in the front diff, but we don't have limited slip in the rear diff. Due to relationship of the drive pinion to the ring gear (without limited slip) the passenger side rear wheel will always be the driven wheel, with virtually no drive power going to the driver's side.

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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So how would all this differ with a Toyota, Honda, Mazda, Nissan, etc.?
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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So how would all this differ with a Toyota, Honda, Mazda, Nissan, etc.?
It may or may not depending on the OEM's chosen AWD configuration.

Some may use a Torsen differential which has been around for a long time and is popular due to its durability.
Others may use viscous type silicone clutch, or other types of arrangements.
There are quite a few on the market!
 

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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It may or may not depending on the OEM's chosen AWD configuration.

Some may use a Torsen differential which has been around for a long time and is popular due to its durability.
Others may use viscous type silicone clutch, or other types of arrangements.
There are quite a few on the market!
Just curious if any in our price range are better? In 2017 the Dynamax was supposed to be a great system.
 

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2019 Kia Sportage. SX with AWD. 2.0L Direct Injected Turbocharged & Intercooled Gas.
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Just curious if any in our price range are better? In 2017 the Dynamax was supposed to be a great system.
Well, how do you quantify 'better'? Less expensive, low mass, low spin losses, easy to package, functions under all conditions, etc....
 

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2017 Sportage SX AWD / Mineral silver with beige interior
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Well, how do you quantify 'better'? Less expensive, low mass, low spin losses, easy to package, functions under all conditions, etc...

In the attached video link notice the response of the driver's side rear wheel when both front tires and the passenger rear tire are allowed to slip

(car no go)
^^^^^^^^^
 
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