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2003 Sorento
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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to put a dual chamber brake master cylinder in my 2003 Sorento. Anybody try this before? Where can I find one that would bolt right in?
 

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2003 Sorento
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21 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
My 2003 Sorentos right rear brake line rusted out and I lost all brakes. I believe US vehicles have a dual reservoir master cylinder. So if a rear line goes, you still have front brakes. Not so with my Sorento. I want to find a dual reservoir for it.
 

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2008 SORENTO EX
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82 Posts
I have an '08 Sorento...it only has 1 reservior (2 outlets). Most modern vehicles only have just 1 reservoir with 1 or 2 outlets. You'll have to go back to the older vehicles that had the old metal (cast iron???) reservoirs that had the separate reservoir chambers. But even with that, I don't think the front and rear brakes were separated...I believe, they were/are diagonally separated. Meaning that the driver side front and rear passenger are on 1 circuit and passenger side front and rear driver are on the other. Not sure if this applies to all/older vehicles...it is just something I remember reading.

If you completely lost pressure in your rear brakes, then it would make sense that you lost the fronts a well with a diagonally split circuit.

That has really very little do with the reservoir (or chambers), but more on how it was designed. If you really have a diagonally split circuit, then you'll need to reroute the brake lines so that the front and rear brakes are on separate circuit...and if you have ABS...pssshhh, forget about it...that makes it 10x more complicated involving the ABS module, PCM, etc.
 

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2008 SORENTO EX
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Just found this with Google search...

"In a four-wheel car, the FMVSS Standard 105, 1976;[7] requires that the master cylinder be divided internally into two sections, each of which pressurizes a separate hydraulic circuit. Each section supplies pressure to one circuit. The combination is known as a dual master cylinder. Passenger vehicles typically have either a front/rear split brake system or a diagonal split brake system (the master cylinder in a motorcycle or scooter may only pressurize a single unit, which will be the front brake).
A front/rear split system uses one master cylinder section to pressurize the front caliper pistons and the other section to pressurize the rear caliper pistons. A split circuit braking system is now required by law in most countries for safety reasons; if one circuit fails, the other circuit can still stop the vehicle.
Diagonal split systems were used initially on American Motors automobiles in the 1967 production year. The right front and left rear are served by one actuating piston while the left front and the right rear are served, exclusively, by a second actuating piston (both pistons pressurize their respective coupled lines from a single foot pedal). If either circuit fails, the other, with at least one front wheel braking (the front brakes provide most of the braking force, due to weight transfer), remains intact to stop the mechanically damaged vehicle. By the 1970s, diagonally split systems had become common among automobiles sold in the United States. This system was developed with front-wheel-drive cars' suspension design to maintain better control and stability during a system failure.
A Triangular split system was introduced on the Volvo 140 series from MY 1967, where the front disc brakes have a four-cylinder arrangement, and both circuits act on each front wheel and on one of the rear wheels. The arrangement was kept through subsequent model series 200 and 700.
The diameter and length of the master cylinder has a significant effect on the performance of the brake system. A larger diameter master cylinder delivers more hydraulic fluid to the caliper pistons, yet requires more brake pedal force and less brake pedal stroke to achieve a given deceleration. A smaller diameter master cylinder has the opposite effect.
A master cylinder may also use differing diameters between the two sections to allow for increased fluid volume to one set of caliper pistons or the other.
A proportioning valve may be used to reduce the pressure to the rear brakes under heavy braking. This limits the rear braking to reduce the chances of locking up the rear brakes, and greatly lessens the chances of a spin."
 
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