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My 2001 Sportage (2WD) died on me suddenly on the way home one night last week. There had been no hint of a problem, aside from perhaps a very slight decrease in power over time. This was bearly noticeable, and I assumed it was an indication of an engine nearing tune-up time.

Then last Tuesday night I made a turn off of a main thoroughfare and the engine began dogging out, just as though I had run out of gas. I had a half-tank remaining from a fill-up though, so there was at least plenty of gas in the tank. I made it about 500 feet before it totally died. I had it towed home and this past weekend I strapped a code scanner onto it and could find no trouble codes returned. I retested a number of times to be sure.

At this point I'm thinking restriction in the fuel delivery system, either clogged injectors or clogged fuel filter. I can get the engine to start & run at a rough idle for a few minutes then it dies. If I depress the accelerator while it's idling it will either die, or simply continue idling with no increase in RPM.

Anyone have any ideas on this one? Any recommendations for a GOOD service manual for a 2001 Sportage?

I'll try to locate a filter to swap out this coming weekend, and if that doesn't work I'll be looking around for an honest mechanic to clean\replace the injectors.

Any chance there's a sharp Kia mechanic hanging out on this forum? :)

THX!
 

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I can"t believe it but I think you have the exact same thing as me.I even got the line off coming from the filter and I have a good squirt of fuel.I even tore mine down to check the timing belt.I am wondering now if it,s possible it could have a bad trottle posistion sensor? I there are butterlies in the silver eni on top of the motor which are connected th the trottle cable and linkage which i think regulate air.There is no carb but if that black sensor on that trottle body quits.It's not going to tell the injector to put any fuel in the system.I just can,t imagine all the injectors quitting at once.unless there is some other controller that recievs info from that TPS that has quit instead?Does this make sense? PLEASE IF YOU FIGURE YOUR OUT PLEASE REPOST YOUR SOLUTION AND I"LL DO THE SAME I AM DESPERATE TO GET THIS THING BACK ON THE ROAD!!!!!!!!! I bought it outright now after my car fleese ran out and it is just sitting I don"t have the money to take it in and I am 40K past my warrenty.
 

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2000 Kia Sportage EX 4x4 auto
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Check TPS sensor sounds like what mine did tapped the sensor and started running fine
 

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1998 Kia Sportage
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You may try having the fuel pressure checked after the filter. These late model sportages dont have a schreder valve on the fuel rail so you have to place an inline tester into them. Granted you may be getting good fuel coming from the line, but thats only part of the equation. While you may be getting a good amount of fuel volume coming through the line, you may not be getting the pressure required to get it up to the injectors and push it through them forcefully enough to where it atomizes properly.
 

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1998 Kia Sportage
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And FYI, an engine will run without a TPS most times, even if the TPS is bad it will still run, just not very well. The only way to properly test one of those is to get a voltmeter and a wiring diagram, as well as resistance specifications, and check it while the engine is running to monitor the percentage of opening that the TPS is giving you in ratio to the percentage of opening that the throttle plates are actually open. For instance, if you are at idle and the sensor is telling you that the throttle position is at 98% open, then something is obviously wrong. Or if you are checking the sensor and you move the throttle but the resistance on the voltmeter doesnt change, then the sensor isnt picking up the change in throttle position. Either way, an engine will default to a 0% opening without the TPS hooked up. The TPS isnt what tells the engine it needs more gas, it is a mixture of the MASS air flow sensor, 02 sensors, MAP sensor, coolant temp sensor, and TPS just to name a few. Therefore, even if one of those parts fails, aside from the MASS sensor, the engine will still run, just badly. *takes a deep breath* phew... I get to talking and I dont shut up, haha
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Taxistud...

If/when I find a solution to this problem, I'll be sure to post it for you. Please do the same if you find an answer first.
THX!

Hal
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Originally posted by cdreece@Dec 3 2005, 05:21 PM
Check TPS sensor sounds like what mine did tapped the sensor and started running fine
cdreece...

I'll give that a try. Where is the TPS located? What does it look like? (I'm still trying to locate a service manual)
THX!

Hal
 

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1998 Kia Sportage
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The TPS is located on the front of the aluminum snorkel right before it connects to the corregated rubber piece. It has 3 wires and a small clip on it that you squeeze to remove the connector. I would strongly advise you find a service manual for it before you start prodding it, no sense in accidentally burning it out if it really isnt bad, lol. And they dont make a good service manual that you can buy in stores, the only place Ive ever found one that was worth anything was directly from Kia.
 

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Oh, and the sensor is black, haha... if you take a look at my sportage in the garage I have a picture of the engine and you can see it plain as day sitting on the front of the aluminum intake right about the valve cover
 

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Oh wait, crudd... I was looking at the wrong thing. Its the sensor on the left hand side of the valve cover right above the fuel injectors. If you look over the intake you can see the throttle cable and latch that operates the butterflies in the back, then directly on the front of that on the intake is the sensor
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Originally posted by RaleTheBlade+Dec 7 2005, 09:37 PM--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(RaleTheBlade @ Dec 7 2005, 09:37 PM)</div><div class='quotemain'>You may try having the fuel pressure checked after the filter. These late model sportages dont have a schreder valve on the fuel rail so you have to place an inline tester into them. Granted you may be getting good fuel coming from the line, but thats only part of the equation. While you may be getting a good amount of fuel volume coming through the line, you may not be getting the pressure required to get it up to the injectors and push it through them forcefully enough to where it atomizes properly.
[/b]


You don't know what an acceptable pressure range is, do you? Would a tee adapter and a magnahelic do the trick or do I need to spring for an in-line tester?

<!--QuoteBegin-RaleTheBlade
@Dec 7 2005, 09:44 PM
And FYI, an engine will run without a TPS most times, even if the TPS is bad it will still run, just not very well. The only way to properly test one of those is to get a voltmeter and a wiring diagram, as well as resistance specifications, and check it while the engine is running to monitor the percentage of opening that the TPS is giving you in ratio to the percentage of opening that the throttle plates are actually open. For instance, if you are at idle and the sensor is telling you that the throttle position is at 98% open, then something is obviously wrong. Or if you are checking the sensor and you move the throttle but the resistance on the voltmeter doesnt change, then the sensor isnt picking up the change in throttle position. Either way, an engine will default to a 0% opening without the TPS hooked up. The TPS isnt what tells the engine it needs more gas, it is a mixture of the MASS air flow sensor, 02 sensors, MAP sensor, coolant temp sensor, and TPS just to name a few. Therefore, even if one of those parts fails, aside from the MASS sensor, the engine will still run, just badly. *takes a deep breath* phew... I get to talking and I dont shut up, haha
[/quote]


As I mentioned, my sporty will start and run for a short period of time before dying out. It just runs VERY rough. And... it will either stall out or give a non-response when hitting the accelerator. I'd like to test the TPS as well as a few other parts, but I don't have the resistance specs or a wiring diagram. Fact is, I'm in the market for a service manual for my sporty but thus far the only thing I've located is a $149.00 manual of unknown quality on books4cars.com. Do you know of any decent manuals for an '01 2WD Sportage?

Hal
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Originally posted by RaleTheBlade@Dec 7 2005, 09:53 PM
The TPS is located on the front of the aluminum snorkel right before it connects to the corregated rubber piece. It has 3 wires and a small clip on it that you squeeze to remove the connector. I would strongly advise you find a service manual for it before you start prodding it, no sense in accidentally burning it out if it really isnt bad, lol. And they dont make a good service manual that you can buy in stores, the only place Ive ever found one that was worth anything was directly from Kia.

THX!

Hal
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Originally posted by RaleTheBlade@Dec 7 2005, 09:53 PM

<snip! snip!>


... they dont make a good service manual that you can buy in stores, the only place Ive ever found one that was worth anything was directly from Kia.

Got it! THX again!

Hal
 

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Seems like this forum is a little slow at putting my posts up, haha... ah well. And I believe most multiport injection vehicles must maintain between 20 and 25 PSI of fuel pressure. Also, yes, you can use a T connector to check the pressure, though its best if you buy a true pressure tester, Ive never used a magnahelic, lol. Just make sure you have a gauge that will read up to 35 PSI. And I wouldnt trust those online sites, go to the Kia dealership and see if you cant get one. You never know what your getting online, it might be legit, it might not be, but 149 bucks certainly isnt worth risking. Dont quote me on those pressure specs though, but I can tell you that it has to be AT LEAST 15 PSI. It sounds like you have a fuel pressure problem to be honest with you, have you tried shooting some ether or gasoline directly into the mouth of the aluminum part of the intake? Take the corrugated rubber off off the aluminum intake snorkel and start the engine. Then have someone keep it alive while you shoot some ether or gasoline into the intake. If it runs better your not getting enough fuel. Im pretty darn sure thats what your problem is.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Originally posted by RaleTheBlade@Dec 7 2005, 11:07 PM
Seems like this forum is a little slow at putting my posts up, haha... ah well. And I believe most multiport injection vehicles must maintain between 20 and 25 PSI of fuel pressure. Also, yes, you can use a T connector to check the pressure, though its best if you buy a true pressure tester, Ive never used a magnahelic, lol. Just make sure you have a gauge that will read up to 35 PSI. And I wouldnt trust those online sites, go to the Kia dealership and see if you cant get one. You never know what your getting online, it might be legit, it might not be, but 149 bucks certainly isnt worth risking. Dont quote me on those pressure specs though, but I can tell you that it has to be AT LEAST 15 PSI. It sounds like you have a fuel pressure problem to be honest with you, have you tried shooting some ether or gasoline directly into the mouth of the aluminum part of the intake? Take the corrugated rubber off off the aluminum intake snorkel and start the engine. Then have someone keep it alive while you shoot some ether or gasoline into the intake. If it runs better your not getting enough fuel. Im pretty darn sure thats what your problem is.
I believe you're on the right track with the pressure being the issue. At this point I've turned it over to a mechanic just 'cause I wanted to expedite the repair. I'll post the results when I have them. I believe I'll pick up a few items to prepare me in the future. I called Kia Motors America Inc. (KMA) Their customer service department will sell me a factory service manual for $89.00 plus tax. For another $43.00 plus tax they'll sell me an electrical troubleshooting manual. Think I'll pick up both of these and a good code scanner. I used an Actron OBD II earlier and it failed to pick up any codes. It even failed to recognize the check engine light as being on. I don't know much about scanners. Is Actron an inferior product. That's the only brand I've been able to find in the auto parts stores around here. Any recommendations?
TIA!

Hal
 

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Originally posted by Linear Motion@Dec 10 2005, 12:39 PM
I believe you're on the right track with the pressure being the issue. At this point I've turned it over to a mechanic just 'cause I wanted to expedite the repair. I'll post the results when I have them. I believe I'll pick up a few items to prepare me in the future. I called Kia Motors America Inc. (KMA) Their customer service department will sell me a factory service manual for $89.00 plus tax. For another $43.00 plus tax they'll sell me an electrical troubleshooting manual. Think I'll pick up both of these and a good code scanner. I used an Actron OBD II earlier and it failed to pick up any codes. It even failed to recognize the check engine light as being on. I don't know much about scanners. Is Actron an inferior product. That's the only brand I've been able to find in the auto parts stores around here. Any recommendations?
TIA!

Hal

The acceptable fuel pressure for the Sportage FI system is 42 PSI.


Actron code readers are the best general purpose OBD-II scanners available to the shade tree mechanic. The Actron scanner you have is either outright defective or you are using it improperly.

I have an Actron OBD-II reader and I've used it on many vehicle types with no problems...including on the Sportage.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Guys...
Thanks for the responses. Got my Sporty back from the mechanic. Turns out the fuel pump was marginal and the timing belt was worn and had slipped. The wrench popped in a new belt along with a new pump and now she's purring like a kitten. :thumbsup: Thanks again guys. I'll be dropping in frequently now that I've found this awesome board. Hope you all had a very cool Yule. Peace!

Hal
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Originally posted by Axe Man@Dec 11 2005, 07:02 PM
The acceptable fuel pressure for the Sportage FI system is 42 PSI.
Actron code readers are the best general purpose OBD-II scanners available to the shade tree mechanic. The Actron scanner you have is either outright defective or you are using it improperly.

I have an Actron OBD-II reader and I've used it on many vehicle types with no problems...including on the Sportage.
Axe Man...
Thanks for the info!

Hal
 
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