GDI Carbon Buildup ? - Page 3 - Kia Forum

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post #21 of 27 (permalink) Old 04-14-2017, 11:59 AM
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Thanks for the clarification, and full credit to you for being way out in front of the pack.

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post #22 of 27 (permalink) Old 04-29-2017, 10:02 AM
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I can say from experience over 3 different cars now that used GDI (my last 3 vehicles, 2006 mazdaspeed3, 2011 hyundai sonata 2.0T and last 2013 Genesis coupe 3.0 track) you will very likely NOT have any issues with the GDI.

This has been a combined amount of 300,000 + miles I have driven a GDI engine, 2 turbocharged, 1 naturally aspirated, I have had ZERO engine issues of any sort. Specifically I know the 2.0 Theta engine well since it was in my sonata. Anyone questioning this, know full well if you are a responsible driver, and maintain your vehicle properly, using reliable gasoline sources there will not be any problems. A bottle of Techron run through it every 3 or 4 months wouldn't hurt, but probably not needed either.

Now if you drive short distances, and never let it warm up I can't speak for that, but it causes problems on regular fuel injected engines too, so you know what to expect there.

If you don't mind spending just a little more on the oil, I highly recommend Pennzoil platinum, as it will keep your engine squeaky clean on the inside. All three of my previous vehicles ran that exclusively, and they were clean like new under the valves after my 100,000 miles of use.


In regards to catch cans, they are not really needed, and a lot of hype to be honest. Not to mention, you will need to be getting under the hood and emptying them on a regular basis or it will spill everywhere and make a mess.
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post #23 of 27 (permalink) Old 04-30-2017, 03:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcguy View Post
I can say from experience over 3 different cars now that used GDI (my last 3 vehicles, 2006 mazdaspeed3, 2011 hyundai sonata 2.0T and last 2013 Genesis coupe 3.0 track) you will very likely NOT have any issues with the GDI.

This has been a combined amount of 300,000 + miles I have driven a GDI engine, 2 turbocharged, 1 naturally aspirated, I have had ZERO engine issues of any sort. Specifically I know the 2.0 Theta engine well since it was in my sonata. Anyone questioning this, know full well if you are a responsible driver, and maintain your vehicle properly, using reliable gasoline sources there will not be any problems. A bottle of Techron run through it every 3 or 4 months wouldn't hurt, but probably not needed either.

Now if you drive short distances, and never let it warm up I can't speak for that, but it causes problems on regular fuel injected engines too, so you know what to expect there.

If you don't mind spending just a little more on the oil, I highly recommend Pennzoil platinum, as it will keep your engine squeaky clean on the inside. All three of my previous vehicles ran that exclusively, and they were clean like new under the valves after my 100,000 miles of use.


In regards to catch cans, they are not really needed, and a lot of hype to be honest. Not to mention, you will need to be getting under the hood and emptying them on a regular basis or it will spill everywhere and make a mess.
I'm on board with all of above, with one exception. Having a "Catch Can" or oil air separator is better than not having one. As long as, as you mention, the owner of the car is diligent and capable of periodically emptying it.
In my mind crankcase oil shouldn't be introduced into the induction tract. Especially in a car that's turbocharged. So far in the course of 28k mi's my 2.0t has dumped between 8 and 9oz's into my oil/air separator. That might not sound like much but who wants an oil slick that doesn't get washed out in their intake path knowing that gdi engines are prone to having intake valve deposit accumulations, and possible issues resulting from it.
A lot of folks only hold onto a car for 3-5yrs, they, will in all likelihood never need to be concerned with any gdi specific issues. So they needn't be concerned with doing anything but OEM suggested maintenance.
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post #24 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-01-2017, 04:55 AM
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The point I was mainly getting to, carbon buildup is simply not an issue to be concerned with on the 2.0T engine used by hyundai / Kia

They have designed the engine to inject fuel in such a way that it does in fact get some onto the backside of the valves so major buildup doesn't get a chance to accumulate. This is a common technique on the more recent engine designs and is used by several different companies, This is what has been determined to work best to reduce the deposits. This method is done by injecting fuel during the cycle where the valve is in the open position so that a mist of fuel / air does get exposed to the valves while they are open. While not as good as fuel coming down into the chamber through the valve, the exposure is enough to resolve the problem.

So now we know that buildup won't be an issue, then look at the downsides of a catch can being in there, this is a high maintenance item that being neglected can cause a serious fire hazard. Also, many of the cheaper designs available are prone to vacuum leaks which causes all other sorts on not really fun stuff to happen. If you suffer from the machining issues on the crankshaft that causes main bearing failure due to metal shavings, and you drop it off at the dealer with that catch can on it, they can grab onto that as a "cause" for the problems and make you pay repairs yourself instead of a warranty repair. Granted, the metal shavings issues have reportedly only affected 2% of these engines overall, but you never know.

From the time I have spent reading this forum, I can safely assume that most people on here are not up to the task of monitoring an oil catch can on a long term basis. Yes, there are some here who would have no problem with it, but as far as a recommendation to everyone, not a great idea. It appears that 10% of the folks on the forum do a lot of self maintenance, the rest are going to the dealer or a private shop for all their work needing to be done.
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post #25 of 27 (permalink) Old 09-07-2017, 09:39 AM
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Carbon deposits of any kind is a result of poor quality feul, and poor quality engine oil, but mostly feul! It is recommended that a feul with a cleaning agent included in it to be used, any other feul will diminish the performance of your car drastically (iv tested this in 2 kia models that had specific feul recommended for them) BP ultimate in Australia is recommended, so 1 day I decided I'd put in 95 a full tank just to test it out, I burned the ultimate in the line (5km) after that my acceleration began slack, cars I could thrash off the mark easily gave me a whopping easily.. Point is, poor quality feul burn fast an burn dirty this is a proven fact, BP ultimate is expensive but it gives me 760km per tank, BP 95 Is a little cheaper but gives 640km per tank. BP ULTIMATE cleans my engine, BP 95 does not in fact its a dirty feul, not as bad as BP 91 but non the less dirty... Choose your feul wisely it determines the life an performance of your engine.. I'v tested this in my Kia pro ceed gt tech 2015 and a kia cerato 2.0 2016.

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post #26 of 27 (permalink) Old 12-13-2018, 08:05 PM
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Theres no way of getting around positive crankcase fumes needing to be reintroduced into the intake, toyota and Ford have designed a dual injection system where they combined port injection with direct injection and that gets rid of the problem but now you have more parts that can fail.
but you can install a catch can, and every 30K run sea foam into the throttle body and burn off any carbon build up, also valvoline just came out with an oil that aids in eliminating carbon build up in intake valves called modern engine oil.
I personally like the catch can idea and cleaning the valves with sea foam every 30k, that sould solve that issue altogether.
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post #27 of 27 (permalink) Old 01-05-2019, 10:23 PM
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GDI Carbon Buildup - 2017 models?

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Originally Posted by cyclon View Post
Theres no way of getting around positive crankcase fumes needing to be reintroduced into the intake, toyota and Ford have designed a dual injection system where they combined port injection with direct injection and that gets rid of the problem but now you have more parts that can fail.
but you can install a catch can, and every 30K run sea foam into the throttle body and burn off any carbon build up, also valvoline just came out with an oil that aids in eliminating carbon build up in intake valves called modern engine oil.
I personally like the catch can idea and cleaning the valves with sea foam every 30k, that sould solve that issue altogether.
I agree with this 100% and have used CRC intake valve and turbo and plan to install a catch can. I mean let's face it, doing all you can to keep blow by oil from passing over the valves regardless of injection method, just makes good sense.
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